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Full text of "Our College Times"

2UG rv:Ff '--.;. LIBRARY 
ELIZAEEIi, . ,. ij COLLEGE 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



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USE ONLY 



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WM. 2. ROY, Lancaster, Pa. 

Book Binder and Blank Book Manufacturer 



Date 1/....^I./..A Crder No ...J^....*:.....!.. 

Title .:l^...C^:.|fi.iL-.......£.;.^^^^ 

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Remarks 7*^.. Lt- j 



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Mention Our College Times When Writing 



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"It's not what we say we do; 
It's what we do." 

How often have you read the promises of men? 

How often have you paid the penalty afterwards? 

We often question the advisability of telling about 
the clothes we sell, for talk is cheap. However, there is 
only one way to interest the man who doesn't know us 
and that is to advertise. So, we are forced to use this 
method of getting in touch with you. 

This advertisement is not going to say a single word 
about our clothes. Its only object is to invite you to 
visit our shop. When you arrive here we'll show you. 

Can we hope to see you soon? 

"FOLLOW THE ARROW" TO 

S. M. MYERS & CO. 

CLOTHIERS — FURNISHERS — HATTERS 
12 East King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Hertzler's Department Store 




Your needs supplied at satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, Groceries. Ready-to-Wear Clothing tor Men 
and Women of all ages. Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oilclotti 
Shoes, Etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-Measure 



CLOTHING 



International Tailoring Co., New York. 
American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chicago. 
Up-to-Date Samcles on Hand. 



Black Cat 

jj . HERTZLER BROS. & CO. 

rjQSlCiry ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits $157,000.00 



General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid on special 
deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 



DIRECTORS 



W. S. Smith 
F. W. Groff 
E. C. Ginder 



Elmer W. Strickler 
J. S. Risser 
Amos G. Coble 



Peter N. Rutt 
B. U Geyer 
E. E. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



Carl Schlotzhauer ; 

The Students Cfficial 
Photographer 



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Don't have your Pho- 
tos taken anywhere else 
or you will regret it. 

You are invited to vis- 
it our studio and notice 
the 1912 Photography, 
something new and differ- 
ent than you have ever 
seen before. 



/cf 



SPECIAL RATE TO STUDENTS 

163 N. Queen St. 

OPPOSITE HOTEL WHEATLAND i 



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I 



We Are Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made to Order 



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Plain 
Clothing 

In This Country 

When in Lancaster it will pay 
you to visit ours, the only 
Clothing Store in that city that 
has One Price to All and gives 
discounts to none. See us for 

MEN'S READY MADE AND 
MADE TO ORDER 

Clothing 

AND 

Furnishing 

YOUTH'S AND BOYS' 
CLOTHING 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Since 1854 at 

Centre Square, Next to City Hall 

LANCASTER, .PA. 



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I 



OCTOBER'S BRIGHT BLUE ^^'EATHER 



A SYMPOSIUM- Part I - _ - _ _ 6 

AMONG THE MOUNTAINS _ _ _ 9 

RESOLUTIONS OF SYMPATHY _ - - n 

EDITORIAL 

A CHANGE - - - _ - 12 

PAYING THE PRICE _ - _ - 13 

THE COLLEGE LECTURE COURSE 16 



ALUMNI 



EXCHANGES, 



20 



SCHOOL NOTES 



21 



(§nr (aalk^t MmtB 



Vol. X Elizabjcthtown, Pa., October, 1912 No. 1 

October's Bright Blue Weather. 

Helen Hunt Jackson. 



O suns and skies and clouds of June, 
And flowers of June tog^ether, 

Ye cannot rival for one hour 
October's bright blue weather. 

When loud the bumble-bee makes haste, 

Belated, thriftless vagrant, 
And Golden Rod is dying fast. 

And lanes with grapes are fragrant. 

When Gentians roll their fringes tight 
To save them for the morning. 

And chesnuts fall from satin burrs 
Without a sound of warning. 

When on the ground red apples lie 

In piles like jewels shining. 
And redder still on old stone walls 

Are leaves of wood-bine twining. 

When all the lovely wayside things 
Their white winged seeds are sowing, 

And in the fields still green and fair. 
Late aftermaths are growing. 

When springs run low, and on the brooks, 

In idle golden freighting. 
Bright leaves sink noiseless in the hush 

Of woods, for winter waiting. 



O suns and skies and flowers of June, 
Count all your boasts together; 

Love loveth best of all the year, 
October's bright blue weather. 



A Symposium — Part I. 

W/hich is the Greatest Art : Literature, Painting, or Music? 



Orville Z. Becker, '15. 



What is literature? It is the art of 
letters, the artistic record of life, the 
immortality of speech. It is the fruit of 
thinking souls and the garden of wis- 
dom. St. Pierre says, "Literature is 
the daughter of heaven descended upon 
earth to soften and charm all human 
ills." I shall now prove that of these 
three arts, literature is the most educa- 
tive. 

Through literature more facts are 
presented and more knowledge trans- 
mitted to succeeding generations in the 
shortest time than by either painting 
or music. Carlyle says, "Oratory is 
simply literature not yet recorded." 
He further states, "Was not there a lit- 
erature before printing: yea it was be- 
fore writing and it was th.e thought of 
thinking souls, which by the blessing of 
God, can in no generation be cast away, 
but remains with us to the end of time 
to uplift mankind since man is onh^ 
what his literature is?" Therefore, 
every day in our churches, in our pub- 
lic schools, colleges, and universities, 
through our preachers, our teachers, 
and our educators, more facts and 
truths are presented to millions of peo- 
ple in one day than could be done in 
years through painting and could, never 
be done by music since music paints no 
mental picture and presents no facts 
but simply is a sometimes pleasing 
combination of sounds which, when 
they have died away, are remembered 
no more. One sentence may express 



what it may take years for a master to 
place on canvas. And then just see 
what a useless waste of energy in pre- 
paring a combination of colors on a 
flat surface to present an object from 
one point of view, when in a few sen- 
tences, through living expressions in 
forms of truth and beauty, can be rep- 
resented the same object from diflfer- 
ent points of view. 

In the second place, literature reach- 
es more of the masses and therefore is 
more uplifting and beneficial than the 
other two arts. Every day millions 
and millions of people are influenced 
by the press and the pulpit. These 
are the great forces that bind a nation 
together, through the medium of which 
we learn of the development of all man- 
kind and not simply of the advance- 
ment of the little circle in which most 
of us travel. Libraries are abundant 
everywhere, containing the great work 
of man. Every college and university 
has Its library as also does every town 
and city of importance, many of which 
have a few of them. But on the other 
hand how many art galleries do we 
find? W'e find them occasionally in 
the largest cities and then, too, when 
you visit one of them — if you ever do 
— how many people as a rule do you 
see there? Every now and then you 
see one or so. This is a fact which will 
be evident to you by simply visiting an 
art gallery. Although some paintings 
have an educational value, it is not 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



transmitted to the masses. They do 
not visit these galleries because they 
can get practically the same facts and 
impressions as good or better through 
the medium of literature. 

Thirdly, the author has a nobler 
work requiring more genius than either 
the painter or the musician because 
literature is a written record of man's 
creative mind, addressing itself in 
worthy expressions to the common re- 
ceptive mind of mankind. Its note or 
chief characteristic is universality, as 
distinguished from all that is limited 
and narrow. Thought whose interest 
and scope is as broad as humanity it- 
self, when suitably clothed in the lan- 
guage of real life, and fitted for the use 
of the generally intelligent mind, con- 
stitutes true literature and this trans- 
mitting of the human thought to the 
written page is the work of the author. 
Now if this is his work then what is 
the noble work of the painter? It is 
simply the smearing together of differ- 
ent colors on a flat surface to repro- 
duce some certain effect which by my 
next point I want to show you is very 
limited toward the unlimited mental 
picture that can be presented or painted 
of the same object through the written 
or printed page. For instance, what 
can a picture or painting tell you about 
wind or heat, about sound or smell, 
about motion, about the feeling of 
roughness or moisture? It can tell 
you none of these, nor can music either, 
for that matter. Also think of how 
many a picture you have seen which 
meant nothing to you because you did 
not know the story connected with it. 
Also a painted picture can represent 
only a single moment in the course of 
a story ; it cannot tell what went before 
or what happened afterward, all of 



which is possible in literature. Fur- 
thermore, besides the mental picture 
painted, the ideas of motion, sound, or 
feeling which we cannot receive from 
the most skillfully painted picture can 
be clearly presented in literature. 
These defects in paintings are also true 
of music save that music does not even 
paint a picture. However, it is not de- 
fective in sound qualities. 

Through literature we also learn to 
know and receive the experiences of all 
men, especially since literary works are 
imperishable. In paintings there is 
only one painting that is original, 
while in literature the great works 
may be printed and reprinted to such 
an extent that they are practically im- 
perishable. This benefit of knowing 
our fellowmen is of great importance 
besides the pleasure we receive in read- 
ing and having our imaginations quick- 
ened. Man is not only a doer of deeds 
but a dreamer of dreams, and to know 
him we must search for his ideals from 
which his acts have sprung and these 
are found recorded only in his litera- 
ture. Our literature is not simply a 
pleasing play of the imagination like 
painting and music, but it is the record 
which preserves the ideals of mankind. 
These ideals — love, faith, duty, friend- 
ship, freedom, reverence, are the part 
of human life most worthy of preserva- 
tion. The Greeks were a marvelous 
people, yet of all their mighty work? 
we cherish only a few ideals, — ideals oi 
beauty in perishable stone, and ideals 
of truth in imperishaable prose and 
poetry. It was simply the ideals of 
the Greeks and the Hebrews and the 
Romans, preserved in their literature, 
which made them what they were, and 
which determined their value to future 
generations. Finally, the highest ere- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ation in literature which is the Bible, 
was, is, and ever will be the greatest 
factor in controlling and influencing 
mankind for good. Now if this is true 
I have proved beyoud refutation that 
literature is the greatest art since we 
all know that our Maker would not 
send his message to us through any 
medium save that which is the most 
specific, clearest, and best medium pos- 
sible. Why did he not send his mes- 
sage through a series of paintings or a 
music book. It is because through the 
medium of literature he had the most 
specific, artistic, permanent, and im- 
perishable means of transmitting it to 
us. Now, let me prove this sixth point 
beyond a doubt. The Bible contains 
the word of God. the state of man, the 
way of salvation, the doom of sinners, 
and the happiness of believers. Its 



doctrines are holy, its precepts are 
binding, its histories are true and its 
decisions are immutable. It is given 
to mankind in life, will be opened in 
the judgment and remembered forever. 
It involves the highest responsibilities, 
will reward the highest labor, and will 
condemn all who trifle with its sacred 
contents. Ladies and gentlemen, when 
this life is no more, all its paintings 
shall be dust and all earthly music for- 
gotten, but the highest form of litera- 
ture, the Holy Bible, will be remem- 
bered throughout ages eternal. We 
can live without music, we can live 
without paintings, but I defy any man 
to prove that we can live without the 
Bible. Its author has placed us here, 
it controls our being here, and it will 
decide our abiding place in eternity. 



-^^^^^^i^^^^r^ 



Among the Mountains. 



Rebekah S. Sheaffer, '13. 



"You don't mean to say he was 
killed, do you " These words spoken 
in a low, sympathetic voice streamed 
from a break in the canvas of an old 
tent perched as if by chance in a re- 
mote spot of a cove. The valley, guard- 
ed on one side by the Blue Mountains 
and shut in on the other by the Tusca- 
roras, is a place that never fails to be 
pleasant since birds and crickets are 
contributing continually to the music 
in the air; nor does it cease to be dole- 
ful because of the clouds of mist which 
overhang the country, never once 
breaking to let the sun beam down on 
the pale faced inhabitants. So small 
is the clearing and so steep are the 
ridges that these giants seem to be 
warning this spot of desolation against 
the evils of a higher degree of civili- 
zation. 

Hiard against this wilderness nothing 
but tents intertwined now and then 
among a few farms can be seen for sev- 
eral miles. It is in one of these tents 
of this retreat that nine boys from a 
distant city spent their vacation. 

It was high noon Monday, when 
these boys arrived at the nearest sta- 
tion on the opposite side of the moun- 
tains. This jolly band had no little dif- 
culty in securing sufficient pack horses 
accustomed to climbing the mountains 
to carry their baggage. After innumer- 
able halts, several sprained ankles and 
three prostrate horses, the summit of 
the'ridge was reached. A valley small 
yet beautiful lay at its foot. TwO ' 
roads leading to the valley were before 
them— one leading to their camp and 



one to a thicket where rumor had it 
that upon entering nothing but severe 
suffering, even death, was the end. 

At this juncture the question running 
through their minds was/'Which road 
shall we take?" The one to the right 
seemed best and was chosen. Several 
paces were already passed when those 
in the rear were frightened by a sud- 
den halt and cry of terror. Six men 
were seen to flee. "A man moaning in 
anguish fell prostrate before Rill's 
horse. That they were on the' wrong 
road was evident. 

"How were they to get out? The 
trail was too narrow for the horses to 
turn ! Had they better go on and drive 
off these ruffians !" These thoughts 
bewildered them. Seven times did 
they stoop to avoid the sight of those 
whom they supposed to be the cave- 
dwellers. 

"We'll shoot the horses and turn 
back," gasped Fred. Sorry that it was 
necessary but glad that so apt a plan 
was available, they killed the horses 
and rushed back never once stopping 
to recognize the dead man. The junc- 
tion was reached and the other pass 
taken. Instead of a dark, dismal trail, 
there was a cheerful and delightfully 
scented pass so that the two hours ride 
to camp seemed but one to all except 
Bill who was thinking of the dead man. 
From three to six o'clock that day, the 
time was spent in getting everything 
ready for their two weeks' stay. That 
night, and for two or three days, little 
but eating and sleeping was indulged 
in. 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The fifth day that week was one that 
will always be a red letter day in the 
minds of those boys. Early breakfast 
was ushered in by the appearance of a 
young girl — the first one they had seen 
since they had left the city. 

She was a perfect figure, with blue 
eyes set under heavy dark eyebrows. 
Her height, the betrayer of her dignity, 
detracted only a bit from her calm sub- 
missive disposition. A kindly nature 
was shown when a smile was returned 
in answer to a frown. Drooping shoul- 
ders, a slow step, and an anxious ex- 
pression told that she was the victim 
of much sorrow. The girl did not re- 
main unnoticed ; for no sooner had she 
entered camp than all the boys inquired 
about the girl to whom Bill was so in- 
tently talking. At this point a spirit of 
rivalry seemed to clutch each boy, but 
in spite of all this, her fascinating ways 
drew them all about her. Each an- 
swer given in reply to the many ques- 
tions sprung upon her seemed to in- 
volve a deeper mystery. Curiosity and 
impatience caused some to return to 
their tents but Bill and John stayed to 
hear her most thrilling story. 

A sudden rush to the tent and a cry 
of, ''Now, boys! I know who that man 
was that fell before us last First day." 
brought a look of surprise to the girl's 
face, and a long silence in the tent, and 
then a whisper, "Do tell Bill !" 

The awe — inspired Bill broke the si- 
lence when he said, "It's a shame, boys. 
Had we but stopped to help that un- 
fortunate man in the pass, we might 
have saved this girl's brother and our 
friend." 

"You're way off, Bill," came from a 
remote corner of the tent. 

A rebuke from the rest, who felt it a 
breach even to think of speaking like 



this at so anxious a moment, and sev- 
eral nods of appreciation caused him to 
finish his story. 

Placing his hand on the girl's shoul- 
der, (for she sat near him ) Bill con- 
tinued, "Our friend's brother left camp 
two miles from here to fetch provisions 
for his mother and her family who 
lived there. Just as we did, so he fol- 
lowed the wrong trail and it is sup- 
posed that he fell a prey to the cave 
dwellers." The girl sat spell bound 
and said rather abruptly. "Did you real- 
ly see him? but you don't mean he was 
killed?" A sympathetic and hesitating 
answer of assent was enough to con- 
vince her of the reality of this circum- 
stance. 

Then Bill slowly continued. "Now 
boys let me tell you. The; man to 
whom we owe our safe arrival and the 
dead man whom we left behind us was 
our friend. Two weeks ago today, he 
came for his vacation to this place — 
his old home. But why did he not tell 
us he was coming here?" There was 
a slight pause and then Harry said, 
"He feared the sneers of some of us for 
living as he did." 

The sympathy of the entire group of 
boys went out to the young girl and 
her family. She left for home, but not 
alone. Bill saw her to her destination, 
where he noticed that poverty reigned. 
He found the mother a distracted wo- 
man and the two children with no sup- 
port save the young girl — June. 

Upon his return to camp he related 
what he had seen. Such an afternoon 
was never before spent. Instead of a 
jolly group of boys th.ere was a sober 
group of gentlemen ; instead of wrang- 
ling and laughter, there was peace and 
sympathy. Camp life was no longer a 
source of pleasure. So the next morn- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



ing they broke camp and all they had, 
even their money, save what they need- 
ed to return home, was given to that 
mother, together with their sympathy 
and promise that, in his turn, each 
should take the place of her soil. 



For years afterward happiness and 
ease crowned that mother's life ; and 
June, though admired by all the camp- 
ers, remained ever true to her sympa- 
thetic- Rill. 



Resolutions of Sympathy. 

Since our Heavenly Father in His in- 
finite wisdom has deemed it wise to 
remove from this life the father of our 
fellow student, Ira R. Herr, be it re- 
solved, 

First. That we commend the sorrow- 
ing children to our Heavenly Father; 
w^ho can heal all earthly sorrows. 

Second, That we, the Faculty and 
students of Elizabethtown College, do 
hereby extend our heartfelt sympathy 
to the bereaved family. 



Third, That the bereaved family re- 
ceive a copy of these resolutions. 
• Fourth, That these resolutions be 
published in Our College Times and in 
the Elizabethtown papers. 

Ralph W.. Schlosser, 
Rebekah S. Sheaffer, 
A. Mack Falkenstein. 

Committee. 

Since Ira R. Herr is a member of the 

class of 1913, a committee, appointed 

by the President of the class, has drawn 

up similar resolutions. 





EDITORIAL BOARD. 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, '11, Editor-in-Chief 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 



Orvillk Z. Beckeb, '15. . . . ^chool Notes 

NoHA L. Rkber, '11 Homerian Mewa 

Mary ScuEArFEM, '18: K. L. S. News 

Leah Sheaefer, '09 Alumni Notes 



C. L. Martin, '13 Excbanees 

J. D. Reber, '14 Bus. Mer. 

A. L. Reber, '13 Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Daisy P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year. 
Arrearage on subscription tu this paper is charged. 

Report any change of address to the Business Manager. • 

Subscription rates: — Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabetbtown Postotlice. 



A Change. 

OUR College Times has now nine 
years of history behind her, and 
with this issue enters upon her 
tenth year. There has been quite a 
growth from the small gray paper of 
May, 1904 to the last issue of Vol. IX. 
From the beginning of the paper it has 
been the aim of the former Editor-in- 
Chief to make this paper depict as viv- 
idly as possible the life of the student 
body on College Hill, as well as to offer 
some of the best productions of the 
class-room and of the society halls, to 



the many readers of this paper. From 
such a course we do not wish to deviate 
and shall endeavor to make this volume 
as interesting as we can to our many 
friends and patrons. 

The Editor-in-Chief feels that with 
the change from the Business Manage- 
ment to the Editor's Sanctum comes an 
increased responsibility. Yet we be- 
lieve that responsibility must be borne 
in all vocations at some time or other 
by younger persons. We also believe 
that science and inventions have ad- 
vanced in spite of the shifting of the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



mantle of responsibility. Consequently, 
we, as a new Editorial Board', enter, 
upon Vol. X not without the feeling 
of hesitancy, but at the same time rely- 
ing upon our own ingenuity and the ex- 
periences of our predecessors. We 
further hope that with this increased 
responsibility we may exercise the 
proper censorship on all articles and 
notes, so that the paper may truly be 
for the advancement of the interests 
<if Elizabethtown College. 

In the publishing of this paper, ti'en, 
I'es a field of opportunity in which ll.c 
student body can assist the manage- 
ment of the school. The best advertise- 
ment of any College is a Christian lady 
or gentleman who has been un- 
'!••: ilic n fluences of its i2.u.h-.t;g. For 
It I', cniv from the pur heari ti-.rtt pKic 
thi-i:^hts can flow; an.i it is the aim of 
thi^ paper to give expression to the 
public of as many of these pure 
thougts as are available from the stud- 
ent body. Here, indeed, is an oppor- 
tunity for the loyal student to assist the 
cause of education, to better others and 
to procure a personal benefit. Students, 
think of the excellent paper that could 
be published if some students would 
write articles and submit them for pub- 
lication ! Let us all set our aim high 
and strive to make Vol. X the most in- 
te-esting volume of the paper yet pub- 
li hed. 

i/uithermore, we believe in the old 
adage, "You can not pour new wine 
•Tito old skins." Methods and th.eovies 
of a quarter of a century ago are in 
infny cases the flotsam and jetsam en 
the modern sea of civilization. Mod- 
ern ideas- and methods should prevail 
Av'hen they do not violate principle, for 
life is progressive. This, however. 



does not necessarily mean that l.fe is 
always improving or, amelir.rating it.>^ 
condition, but it clearly dem.onstraies 
.'th( impossibility of a stand still. We 
^re either advancing or retrograding. 
In order to abide by this universal law 
f-r 1 le. we deem it advisable to make 
a :''w changes in our publicaiion. Per- 
sonalities, wil be scattered to the four 
winds unless they concern the reading 
public of this paper; the student body 
wiU be given an opportunity to develop 
originality of expression as far as the 
rules of rhetoric will allow ; humor and 
wil in the school notes will be tolerjted 
when they savor of true wit and trre 
humor;' and' the Editorial staff vill 
hereafter appear on the first editorial 
page. With these changes we shall en- 
ter upon our duties, mindful of liie 
many opportunities in our hands ruid 
the responsibilities upon our shoulki^^. 



Paying the Price 

WHiat though the rose have prickles, 
yet 'tis plucked. — 

Shakespeare- Venus and Adonis. 
The present generation seems to 
have a mistaken idea about getting 
something for nothing. The bargain 
counter is thronged with crowds be- 
cause of this delusive idea. To be sure 
the merchant is not going to lose mon- 
ey on the whole, even though he may 
lose on a few sundry articles. As a 
rule we usually pay well for what we 
buy at the bargain counter. No farm- 
er will sell a good animal at bargain 
rates, for he knows that which has val- 
ue will also bring its price. The lus- 
cious fruit, moreover, commands the 
best price on market and is -also the 
best seller because there is a value in it. 
It satisfies a lawful appetite. The man 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



who builds a house is willing to pay the 
price for modern conveniences and does 
not expect first-class material at a large 
reduction. Then, too, the manufactu- 
rer is willing to qay well for any inven- 
tion which will increase the income on 
his investment. There is no quibble 
when a good mvention is to be bought. 
The inventor deserves the price and th,e 
manufacturer feels he is getting the 
worth of his money. Again, the great- 
est paintings of the masters can only 
be bought by paying the price. Talent 
expressed in this form may even ac- 
quire such value that only those with 
large sums of money can buy it. 

Many of us may be too poor finan- 
cially to pay the price of some of the 
things just mentioned, but there is one 
thing we all can purchase if we are de- 
termined to buy— an education. 
We are all endowed with ca- 
pabilities for the accomplishment 
of life's destiny But the man 
who attempts to perform his miss- 
ion in life by a blind use of his God- 
given powers will not attain the "mark 
of the high calling." Neither can the 
farmer acquire the greatest success in 
this age, if he does not learn to handle 
modern tools. Craftsmanship, the 
ability to handle tools, is the keynote to 
success today. No matter what art bfe 
investigated, it will be found that the 
great masters in those respective arts 
were masters of their tools. If crafts- 
manship, then, is the test of efficiency, 
every young person should be anxious 
to learn how to use his God-given 
powers. Of course, obstacles may be- 
set a young person, but to an earnest 
student they are a benediction in dis- 
guise. The road to success is paved 
with obstacles that have been over- 
come ; the way to failure, with good in 



tentions never accomplished. Conse- 
quently, by the boy or girl who has grit 
and tenacity of purpose, craftsmanship 
can be had by deciding to become a 
master of obstacles — a character 
freed from ignorance and superstition 
— a liberally educated man or woman. 

H,owever, this education can not be 
had without paying the price. The 
person who would have a broader view 
of life must pay this price in toil. The 
boy who has never earned a dollar un- 
der the scorching rays of a July sun can 
little appreciate the sacrifice of parents 
or the nominal cost of his education. 
Lack of industry on the farm, or in any 
other vocation in life, is one of the es- 
sential ingredients in the failure of a 
student at College. School is real life, 
and no one need expect any 'benefit 
without putting forth strenuous ef- 
forts.. The student who loafs never be- 
comes a skilful craftsman, and when 
he leaves school, will also loaf. School 
life means work. Too many young 
men go through school following the 
path of least resistance and when they 
have completed their course they are 
but mere puppets in facing realities. — 
indeed offering little resistance to pres- 
sure. Then, again, too many stu- 
dents finish college courses and cover 
a wide range of subjects but none of 
them very thoroughly. We do not be- 
lieve in early specialization, but we do 
believe in the early selection of a defi- 
nite aim in life. Breadth gives view; 
but depth, efficiency. So do not be a- 
fraid to dig deep, to turn a little sub- 
soil now and then, and to burn a little 
extra oil for efficiency's sake. In short, 
part of the price must be paid in good 
honest labor. 

It is also an evident fact that crafts- 
manship becomes an art only as we ex- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



ercise care. The typewriter can never 
hope to run his fingers carelessly over 
his machine while in school and th.eil 
expect a position requiring accuracy 
and speed after graduation. Nor can 
the music student listlessly allow his 
fingers to glide over the keys of the 
piano during practice periods and after 
graduation expect to accompany Mme. 
Nordica or by a virtuoso. Any student 
who has not arranged his work with 
care ought to formulate carefully a plan 
and then work that plan. He nmst 
select that which is conducive to the 
development of his particular tools. 
A haphazard program in school v ill 
develop a haphazard college studei.t. 
Just as the student must exercise care 
in his method of work so he must cul- 
tivate habits of neatness and cleanli- 
ness. The student who has his books 
upside down on his table with others 
in a correct position, who has pictures 
on the wall that are not hanging 
plumb, who has no particular place for 
each article in his room, is not yet 
liberally educated ; he is still bound by 
the web of confusion and disorder. In 
addition to this acquisition of personal 
habits, school life demands a proper 
conception of human rights and privi- 
leges begin. For, the student who can 
rights end where his neighbor's privi- 
leges begin. For the student who can 
never agree with his room-mate or 
is always in trouble on the hall, can not 
expect to leave a college dormitory 
and be an ideal citizen. School is life 
in all its reality and earnestness, and 
whoever can not exercise enough care 
in the discernment of rights and privi- 
leges in school has not yet learned to 
live the Christ life. He has not yet 
paid the price in care. 



Though a student is paying the price 
in toil and in care, there is yet one way 
in which he must pay the price to in- 
sure a liberal educaion. The Savior 
spent thirty years in preparing for 
three year's work; we must pay the 
price of a liberal training, in time. 

The mushroom grows up in a night 
and shrivels up under the rays of the 
next day's scorching sun. In spring 
the farmer plants his corn and in au- 
tumn gathers the golden ears. He 
plants an orchard and must wait some 
years before he can pick. the luscious 
fruit. When God decides to grow an 
oak tree he takes a century, and per- 
haps thousands of years to carve a val- 
ley on the bosom of mother earth. This 
undeniably portrays to us the fact 
that things worth w^hile require time 
in the natural world. This same law 
holds true for the achievements of 
mankind and for great world move- 
ments. The pyramids were not 
built in one year; many of 
the vast cathedrals of Europe 
w^ere not built in one decade ; the king- 
doms of the world were not established 
in one century; the languages of the 
world were not fully developed in five 
centuries; and Christianity, the great- 
est power on earth, v as not fully 
developed in nineteen centuries, for it 
is still growing. 

In the face of this testimony will 
the student claim that he is fitted for 
the work of the world after one year of 
preparatory work? In the first place, 
the student in the Commercial course 
can not expect to be an expert in the 
business world after one year in 
school. For business is today a science 
and needs the best brains the colleges 
can furnish. There are more positions 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



vacant for $1200 men than there are 
$1200 men to fill them. The top of 
the ladder is never crowded, bvit let it 
also be remembered that the top of a 
ladder is never reached without start- 
ing at the bottom. Then, again, the 
student who expects to enter the teach- 
ing profession should not stop his 
school work before having finished at 
least a four year's Pedagogical Course. 
School boards in the near future will 
hire only teachers who hold a diploma 
from a College or Normal School to di- 
rect the plastic minds of our youth. 
So do not be in a hurry to get through 
school, but allow the school to get 
through you. No person has yet re- 
gretted an extra year spent in school. 
Be thorough even if it requires this ex- 
tra year, for the graduate in the next 
dec&de, if he shall succeed, must have 
such a degree of efficiency as our col- 
lege men have never before realized 
to be necessary. For we are living in 
an age of false doctrines and sooner or 
later it will fall to the rising genera- 
tion to stand as a man and clear away 
the mists of darkness from the souls 
of benighted men and women. Young 
men and young women, are you willing 
to' pay the price in toil and care and 
time for a liberal education? 



The College Lecture Course 

We believe the Library Committee 
has secured for the school year 1912- 
'13 the strongest and most interesting 
course of lectures and entertainments 
ever secured for the students and 
friends of Elizabethtow^n College. The 
legturers, the readers, and the musici- 
ans for this course represent a number 
of states and cover a wide range of sub- 
jects, and we have great reason to be- 



lieve the course will be practical and 
beneficial to all classes of people. It 
is our desire that every student avail 
himself of this opportunity of getting 
inspiration from these experienced 
minds. 

The first number of this course will 
be given by Humphrey C. Deibert on 
the subject, "Janies Whitcomb Riley." 
Mr. Deibert comes highly recommend- 
ed and deserves the patronage of young 
and old, for his subject has universal- 
ity of appeal. This lecture will be 
given October 9. 1912. 

The George P. Bible Family will give 
an elocutionary and musical entertain- 
ment on October 30. 1912, in Heisey's 
Auditorium. This is the only number 
of the course that will be given in town. 
Mr. Bible has been with us before and 
has always been appreciated by large 
crowds. 

Byron C. Piatt gave us such an in- 
structive lecture last year that the Lib- 
rary Committee has decided to have 
him lecture for us again this year, on 
January 21, 1913. His subject has not 
yet been secured but we hope to an- 
nounce it in the next issue of this pa- 
per. No one should fail to hear Air. 
Piatt. 

•■, Our ancestral religion has always 
been an interesting study, especially 
that of the Swiss anl . the . German, 
Hence, none of the lecturers will be of 
more local interest than that of H. 
Frank Eshleman. on February 13. 1913, 
on the subject, "German-Swiss Relig- 
ious Foundation and Background of 
Lancaster County." This lecturer has 
also appeared before the public of Eliz- 
abethtown. 

The date for the next lecture has not 
yet been definitely arranged, but will 
be sometime during the latter part of 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



April, 1913. At this time, George W. 
Bain, the renowned orator from Ken- 
tucky, will give us one of his inspiring 
addresses. The College Chapel should 
not have an em-pty seat to stare Col. 
Bain in the face. His subject and exact 
date will be announced later. 

The last lecture of the coursV will 
be given May 15, 1913. by D. Webster 
Kurtz on "The Meaning of Culture." 
Dr. Kurtz is pastor of the First Church 
of the Brethren in Philadelphia and is 
in the front ranks of American lectu- 
rers on social and educational problems 
His subject should especially concern 
€very student at College, and we hope 
none of our patrons and students will 
miss the opportunity of hearing an 



able discussion on such an important 
theme. %'" ^' .• 

Although the above coiirse repre- 
sents quite an investi^^ntfor the Lib- 
rary Committee, yet. tHey. have iinplicit 
confidence in the patronage of a large 
number of people and- have decided to 
offer the entire course of six numbers 
at the low price of one dollar and. fifty 
cents. Every student and friend of ed- 
ucation should provide himself /with 
a season ticket and thus assist this 
noble cause. The proceeds will be 
used in purchasing books for the Cor- 
lege library. Be ready to buy a sea- 
son ticket when the solicitor calls, 
and show your loyalty to the in- 
stitution. 





The beginning of the new school 
year finds our Alumni very busily en- 
gaged in their respective lines of work. 
Some have remained in school ; many 
have gone out into other fields of 
activity. We feel very glad to note 
that ten graduates of last year and 
former years have returned to further 
their education. 

However. the place of J.E.Myers, "ii 
and H. K. Eby, 'ii, are vacant, as they 
have entered Ursinus College in order 
to pursue their College work further. 

Miss Lillian Falkenstein, 'ii, has ac- 
cepted a position as teacher in the Heb- 
ron Seminary at Nokesville, Virginia. 
E'town is now represented there by 
three persons : B. Mary Royer, '07, 
Jennie Miller, '09, and Miss Falken- 
stein '11. Our College Times wishes 
them much success. 

I. E. Oberholtzer, '06, who spent the 
past two years teaching in Daleville 
College, has entered Dr. White's Bible 
School of New York City. 

Massachusetts again claims one of 
our Alumni. Daisy P. Rider, '10, who 
has accepted a position as Colorist in 
the Wallace Nutting Studios of Fra- 



mmgham, Mass. She reports that her 
work is "very delightful and most fasci- 
nating." Her address is Station A,. 
Box loi, Framingham. Miss. 

I. E. Shoop, who was elected as Prin- 
cipal of the Commercial Department, to 
fill the vacancy caused by the resigna- 
tion of J. Z. Herr, was forced to re- 
sign his position on account of failing 
health. E'town College is very sorry 
to lose him as he had already won the 
confidence of the students. We hope 
his health will improve so that he may 
be with us again in the future. 

During the summer vacation, W. K. 
Kulp. '12, was elected to the ministry 
by the Church of the Brethren at Eph- 
rata. Surely, every Alumnus wishes to 
him God-speed in his new calling. 

Abel Madeira, '10, is now employed 
as teacher of Penmanship in a school 
at Burlington, Iowa. Indeed, our 
Alumni are scattered from east to west 
and from north to south. It may now 
be said that he sun never sets on the 
Alumni of Elizabethtown College. 

Miss Luella G. Fogelsanger, '06, af- 
ter several years of student life and 
teaching in New York and in Massa- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



<:husetts, has gone to Juniata College 
where she is employed as teacher in the 
"Commercial Departmeat. 

A. C. Hollinger, 'lo, now a graduate 
of Juniata College in the Piano course, 
is at present demonstrating for the 
Heppe Piano Company at Lancaster. 
He has his studio in the Hager building 
where he also gives instruction to pri- 
vate pupils. 

The school is in receipt of a very 
beautiful picture donated by Mrs. Mar- 
garet Haas Scwenk, 'lo. Gifts, such 
as this, are always very much appreci- 
ated. Mr. and Mrs. Schwenk with 
Laura Winona are now living on a 
farm near Loganton, Clinton County, 
Pa. 

Reports say that Mr. Leiter, 'lo, 
makes a fine hall teacher. 

The school was favored recently with 
visits from the following: Mrs. J. J. 
Heilman. '05, IMiss Fogelsanger, '06, 
A. C. Hollinger, '10, and W. E. Glas- 
mire, '07. 

Prof. R. \V. Schlosser. '1,1. preached 
his first series of meetings in York 
County during the summer vacation. 
His success was shown by the fact that 
ten persons made application to unite 
with the church. Mr. Schlosser per- 
formed the rite of baptism. 

A card of recent date from M. Ger- 
trude Hess, '11, informs us that she is 
at present teaching Mathematics and 
Music in the High School at Curwens- 
ville, Pa. 

In all, thirty-two or more of E'town's 
■graduates are now teaching, either in 
public schools or at some higher- in- 
stitution. Several are giving private 
instruction in music in their home com- 



munities. May all their lives echo and 
reecho for good in the lives of the 
ones whom they teach. 

We also have a very interesting let- 
ter from Kathryn Ziegler, '08, who is 
now stationed at Anklesvar, India. We 
would like to print her entire com- 
munication but on account of the lack 
of space we can give only a part of 
it. She writes : 

"I wish that . all might know how 
much I enjoy this monthly letter, Our 
College Times, from my Alma Mater. 
As often as I read good news from the 
homeland these words come to my 
mind, 'As cold water is to a thirsty 
soul, so is good news from a far coun- 
try.' We are scattered over the land 
far and wide and can never hope to 
meet again as we have met before, but 
to know about each other's work and 
successes is a great satisfaction and a 
boundless joy. 

"It is now nearly two months since I 
have been able to be at my work very 
much. This is the monsooii season, 
and if it rains as usual, one can not go 
out to the villages because the roads 
are jungle roads. ir There are also a 
number of small streams that have no 
bridges and these are dangerous to 
cross after a heavy rain. A number of 
people lost their lives this year in try- 
ing to ford swollen streams. The rains 
have been very good and there is re- 
joicing in the land; the people are busy 
putting out their crops and the country 
appears beautiful. Before these rains 
the country looked barren and a fami- 
nine was feared." 

The letter closes with a description 
of a missionary trip which spape will 
not allow us to publish. 




Wihen criticism and comment are 
used for other purposes than helpful- 
ness, they lose their real mission. 
Criticism that tends to ridicule is not 
worthy of a reader's attention ; nor on 
the other hand should flattery be al- 
lowed to win the good-will of anyone. 

Out of the sociological law, that as- 
sociation is beneficial, has grown the 
saying that our best friends are those 
who tell us our faults. It is in this 
attitude of helpfulness that we wish to 
pose for his year's work. Should our 
comments be out of place in any way 
through thoughtlessness, or unsound 
judgment be expressed on our part, 
it is not our will that it be so. 

Although we do not meet the contri- 
butors to our exchanges in person, yet 
in thought we face each other. We 
are then an organization of individuals 
existing for the benefit of its members. 
It is the duty of every member to act 
as a commentator on the work of ev- 
ery other member and to do his work 
conscientiously. Under these condi- 



ions do we welcome our friends into- 
the membership of this organization. 

We believe the "Delaware College 
Review" is typical of the college spirit 
of that institution ; but when that spirit 
means nothing more than an exuber- 
ance of enthusiasm in athletic feats, it 
has lost its true meaning. A wrong 
status is placed on sports, when three 
fourths of the space in a college paper 
is devoted to athletic scores. 

Dr. Flory, in the Bridgewater Col- 
lege Bulletin, very vividly portrays the 
place the small college should have in 
an earnest student's life. It is not the 
number of students a college turns out 
that counts ; it is quality that the world 
wants. 

The Manchester College Bulletin is 
very neat in its appearance and no less 
commendable in regard to its contents. 
Its pages have no room for trifles. It 
acquaints its readers not only with her 
athletics but also with the other activi- 
ties of the school. 




s 


















t 



L 




It is to labor, and to labor only, that 
man owes everything possessed of ex- 
changeable value. Labor is the talis- 
man that has raised him from the con- 
dition of the savage ; that has changed 
the desert and the forest into culti- 
vated fields, that has covered the earth 
with cities and the ocean with ships : 
that has given us plenty, comfort, and 
elegance, instead of want, misery, and 
barbarism. — M'Culloch. 

It was on September 2, 1912, the day 
that our nation honors the laboring 
man by a holiday, that Elizabethtown 
College opened its thirteenth school 
year with the largest Fall term enroll- 
ment in the history of the school. The 
present enrollment is about one hun- 
dred and twenty-five students. The new 
and the old students have become ac- 
customed to the ways of school-life 
and seem to feel at home on College 
Hill. ' Thus far no serious cases of 
homesickness have been reported. 
School work is progressing very fav- 
orably. 

The two Literary Societies are in 
running order again. Within two 
weeks the Keystone Literary Society 



raised its membership from 403 to 
424. The Homerian Literary Society 
is also busy. 

This is the first year that no public 
program was rendered at Elizabeth- 
town College on the evening of the 
opening day of school. Instead of hav- 
ing a public program the management 
adopted another means of getting its 
students acquainted with one another. 
This was by means of a social, which 
seemed to be enjoyed by all. Also on 
September 13, Music Hall witnessed 
another crowd of happy students gath- 
ered together for a few hours of social 
intercourse and enjoyment. 
"A few hours of such enjoyment spent 
Is worth an age of splendid discontent" 
— James Montgomery. 

Charity Hall which has now changed 
its name to "Memorial Indian Hall" is 
the only one to receive a change in a 
hall teacher. Their new "chief" is Mu 
Laban W. Leiter. He has taken the 
place of Prof. W. K. Gish, generally 
known as "Pop," who with his wife is. 
now located on a farm in Alberta, Can- 
ada. 

Five years ago the "Memorial In- 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



dians" had a leader by the name of 
"Light." They now have one named 
*'Leiter." \\'e are hoping- that in th,e 
near fuure we may meet "Mr. Light- 
est." 

Out-door sports, especially tennis 
and baseball, are receiving considerable 
attention this year. Three tennis 
courts are in fine condition for playing, 
with a fourth court soon to be ready. 
On September sixth was played the 
firs baseball game of the season. This 
was between the "Old" and the "New" 
students and resulted in a score of 13 
to I, in favor of the old students. 
On September thirteenth, on the col- 
Ige diamond, the day sudents' team 
was defeated by the boarding students' 
team by a score of 26 to 3. On Sep- 
tember twentieth the "New" students' 
baseball team met its second defeat 
from the "Old" students' team in a 
score of 28 to 9. 

New — Engle. ib; Brandt, 3b; Geyer, 
2b ; Lineaweaver, c ; Hershey, p ; Falk- 
enstein, ss ; J. Shoop, If; Hiestand, cf; 
Shelly, rf. 

Old — Reber. ib ; Kiefer, c ; Long, 2b : 
Kulp. p; Diehm, If; Brumbaugh. 3b; 
C. Long, ss ; Kreider, cf ; Nye, rf. 

On Octolper 9 the College Lecture 
^Oiirse of this year was ushered in with 
a lecture given by Humphrey C. Dei- 
bert. The subject of the lecture was 
"James Whitcomb Riley." It was 
very entertainingly rendered and was 
full of the interesting facts in the life 
of this great and beloved author. 

Mr. Waltz has acquired the habit of 
eating "ginger snaps" at night during 
his sleep. They have served their pur- 
pose excellently thus far, for his weight 
..has increased ten pounds since he ac- 
quired the habit. 



This summer the announcement was 
made that on August 14, 1912, the Col- 
lege buildings would be cleaned and 
that everybody was welcome to come 
and help. When the day arrived it 
proved to be ideal "house cleaning" 
weather. When the number who came 
to help were counted, the list amounted 
to ninety-six. After a good half-day's 
work an excellent dinner was served by 
Michael Ober's, the parents of one of 
our teachers. A public program was 
then rendered in Music Hall. It con- 
sisted of music, and speeches by Eld. S. 
R. Zug. Dr. D. C. Reber, and Prof. H. 
K. Ober. The work for the day was all 
easily accomplished and everybody 
seemed happy and joyous at the assist- 
ance they had rendered to the school 
and the many new acquaintances they 
had made. 

Misses Latshaw, sisters of our form- 
er student, Chalmer Latshaw, have en- 
rolled since the opening of school. On 
October 3, 1912, Gertrude Kable also 
enrolled for class work at the College. 
She is one of our Maryland students. 

Prof. H. K. Ober gave an excellent 
address at the Children's Meeting at 
the Church of the Brethren in Eliza- 
bethtown on, October 6, 1912. It was 
full of instruction for the older folks as 
well as for the young. 

It may be advisable for us to follow 
the example of Mr. Joshua Reber who 
says that he sold his Cicero for exactly 
the same price that he got for it. 

Miss Meyer (in the dining room :) 
"Now if there is anyone here who is not 
present will the person please raise his 
hat?" 

The heating plant of the College was 
put into operation for the first time 
this year on September 30, 1912. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



Mr. George Neff (College Bull 
Moose Party Leader) was home on Oc- 
tober 4, and received a new supply of 
Party pins, and badges, fobs, and en- 
thusiasm. 

Miss R. S. seems to be interested in 
the subject of marriage. Quite a few 
gentlemen have been asked by her 
when they intend to get married. 

Miss Mary Markley, one of our form- 
er teachers, is again teaching at Agnes 
Scott College, Georgia. 

On September 30, the father of one 
of our students, Miss Helen Oellig, 
paid a visit to the College. 

On October 6, Prof. J. G. Meyer ad^ 
dressed a Children's Meeting at Bare- 
ville. 

Mr. Peter Shelly, the father of one of 
our students, Percy Shelly, spent a few 
days with us at the opening of school. 

Eld. Samuel R. Zug resigned his el- 
dership in the church of the Brethren 
of Elizabethtown and is moving to Pal- 
myra. On September fifteenth he gave 
a very instructive farewell sermon at 
the College ch.apel. 

Mr. Dennis, our janitor, one night 
last week on hearing a noise in the 
College chicken house, shouldered his 
gun and stealthily approached it to in- 
vestigate the cause of the disturbance. 
After stationing himself in front of the 
door he called lustily, "Mach dich 'raus, 
werever es du bischt." To his surprise 
he received the following answer, 
"Really, Mr. Man, nobody am in here 
but we chickens. 

The apple crop in the two-year old 
apple orchard at the college has 
amounted to one apple. A photograph 
has been taken of the apple and will be 
placed in the College museum. 



A great factor in advancing cviliza- 
tion at Elizabethtown College has been 
the construction of a telephone line 
connecting the "Memorial Indians" 
with the culture of Independence Hall. 
Messrs. Waltz and Leiter in whose 
rooms this line terminates have had 
the kindness to open their rooms for 
the use of the student body. Any- 
body is invited to use the telephone 
freely as all expenses are already paid 
for and no fees charged. 

It may be of interest to some of our 
readers to know that Mr. George Nefif, 
the booster of the Bull Moose party at 
Elizabethtown College, has applied for 
the janitorship of the President's Ofifice 
Building at Washington — provided 
"Teddy" is elected. 

On the evening of September twen- 
tieth after the rendition of the Key- 
stone Literary Society program. Prof. 
T. G. Meyer and wife entertained the 
gentlemen students of the college in 
their room on Independence Hall. It 
was an hour very pleasantly spent. 

On the evening when the new tele- 
phone line was installed between the 
College Buildings, Mr. Leiter, one of 
those employed to install it, called 
from Memorial to Alpha Hall fifty nine 
times, "What's he doin' now. It does- 
n't work yet." 

Mr. Hofifman in Geometry class : 
"You can't sometimes always tell 
whether a triangle is a triangle because 
they have so many diflferent shapes." 

One of the questions in the minds 
of many of the sudents is whether Mr. 
C. J. took advantage of the rainy 
weather during the third and fourth 
weeks of school to take another of his 
Sunday evening walks; 



24 



OUR' COLLEGE TIMES 



Senior Class 

No former Senior class of Elizabeth- 
town College can compete ' with the 
class of 1913 for promptness in class 
organization. The officers of the class 
are : 

President— C. L. Martin. 

Vice President — Ira H'err. 

Secretary — Rebekah Sheaffer. 

Treasurer — E. G. Diehm. 

Historian — Ruth Landis. 

Prophet — Mary Scheafifer. 

Athletic Manager — E. G. Diehm. 

The colors which have been selected 
are "Maroon and Steel." They have 
chosen for their motto the German 
saying. "Gedult Uberwindet Alles." 
The class roll of this honorable and 
august body is as follows : 

Pedagogical Course — Nora L. Reber, 
Irene Sheetz, Rebekah Sheaffer, C. L. 
Martin. 

College Preparatory Course C. J. 

Rose. A. L. Reber, Ira Herr, E. G. 
Diehm, Mack Falkenstein, Herbert 
Root. 

Music 
Dennis. 

English 
Scheaffer. 

Agricultural Course — Daniel Hoff- 
man. 

Commercial Course — — C. L. Bone- 
brake, Paul Kiefer, Hiram 'Eberly, 
E. G. Long, Samuel Brumbaugh, Ruth 
Landis, Elizabeth Miller. 

English Scientific Course — Rhoda 
Miller. 



Teachers' Course — Carrie 
Bible Course — Mary 



Homerian News 

This, another school year, has 

"brought back a number of Homerians, 

new ones as well as old ones. The 

Society is proud of the various prospec- 



tive members who are well qualified 
to work up a strong organization. As 
yet not all the qualified students for 
this society have made application for 
membership. 

On September 13, this Society held 
its first private meeting. These new 
officers were elected and installed : 
Recording Secretary, Nora Reber; 
Monitor, Prof. J. S. Harley ; Librarian, 
B. F. \V|altz. The vice-president, Mr. 
I. J. Kreider, filled the Speaker's chair 
which was left vacant by the former 
Speaker, C. E. Resser who did not re- 
turns this fall. A Program Committee 
was appointed by the Speaker to pre- 
pare a public program which is to be 
given October 13th. 



K. L. S. News. , 

The Keysone Literary Society met 
in regular Executive Session on Friday 
evening, September 13. The attendance 
was large for the first program of the 
new school year. At this meeting eight- 
een new members were elected. The 
following officers were also elected : 
Pres., C. J. Rose ; Vice Pres., Mr. E. G. 
Diehm; Sec, Miss Sarah Moyer; Edi- 
tor, Mr. Joshua Reber; Treas., Mr. 
Wni. Kulp ; Reporter, Mr. Albert Re- 
ber'; Recorder, Miss Edna Brubaker; 
Critic, Mr. H. H. Nye. The chief fea- 
tures of the program were the piano 
solo by Miss Viola Withers and the 
debate, Resolved, That the Western 
Continent is more richly stored by na- 
ture for the use of man than the East- 
ern. Affirmative speakers were: Mr. 
A. L. Reber and Mr. W. F. Eshleman ; 
the Negative: Miss Irene Wise and Mr. 
C J. Rose. 

Friday evening, September 20,' the 
Society met in Literary Session. The 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



following program was rendered. 

Inaugural dadress by Pres. C. J. 
Rose. The members who had been 
elected at a previous meeting then took 
their pledge of membership. 

Music — Instrumental solo, "Moon- 
light on the Hudson" by Carrie Dennis. 

Essay — "The Beauties of Autumn" 
by Edna Wenger. 

Symposium — Which, is the greatest 
art, Literature, Painting, or Music? 

Literature — Orville Becker. 

Painting — Walter Eshleman. 

]\Iusic— C. L. Martin. 

The judges decided in favor of Liter- 
ature. 



Music — "Juanita" by the Society. 

Recitation— "The Unpaid Seam- 
stress," by Naomi Longenecker. 

Literary Echo — by the Editor. 

Music — "Star of the Evening" by 
Male Quartet. 



The rhetoric class was studying 
Coherence in the Paragraph, when the 
teacher asked, "If you should follow the 
principle of rhetoric observed in this 
recipe, "How to Fry Tomatoes," what 
would you get? Instead of answering, 
"Perfect coherence." Miss K. promptly 
replied, "Fried tomatoes." 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



CENTRAL 



MEAT 



MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



H. H. GOOD 



ELIZABETH TOWN 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 

R. H. SHISSLER. 



Plain Suits, Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnisliing Goods and Hats. 

GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orango Sts., Lancaster, Pa. 



Elizabethtown Dental 
Parlors 

Office Closed Tliursday 
and Friday 

S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 

Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



26 OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



1900 1912 

IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 

SEVEN REASONS : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Equipment. 

For further particulars, address 

Elizabethtown Colleo^e 

ELIZABETHTOWN PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



27 



Jl■){||IBIIIIIHllll;a/.^Ql;lll■lllllBlil;alllllBIIIIHIII■illl:■l:!|la^^^^ 
^ College Jewelry of the Better Sort 

I G. WmTREISNER 

■ 

g Manufacturing 

g Jevi^eler 

^ Class Pins and Rings Prize Cnps 

s Fraternity Jewelry Medals 

2 120 East Chestnut Street. 

I LANCASTER, PA. 

MiiiiiniiiiniiiiBiiiiiHiiiiHiiiniiiiiniiiiBiiiiiBiiiiiiiiiiniiiiHiiiiiBiiiii^ 



■ M ' ^ ' I ' I . I m |. » ». | . t . i i |m| i i i I . ! .. I..I..| . .i.4 .4.4.4.4»|.4^4. 

LEO KOB I 

I Heating and | 

I Plumbing f 

* * 
± ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. I 

* t 

% F. T. Muth H. M. Ml ■ 

I MUTH BROS. 



Dealers in 



LUMBER^ 

Also all kinds of building material 
and mill work, Slate and Cement, 
Wheeler Screens, Fertilizer, Patent 
Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board, etc. 

COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. 

We also aim to give you a square 
deal tliat will merit your trade and 
friendship. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



t 

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t 

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*■ I 

* 

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* 



DENTIST 

GEO. R. KERSEY 

Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
WE DO IT RIGHT 

Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES CEi SON 

F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 

Horseshoeing a Specialty. 

N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 

J. CROFF & SONS 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 




Carry 
This Pen 



r es, in any posi- 



— if you want fo. 
tion, any pocket. 

Boys: cany the Parker Jack Knife 
I en in your trousers pocket along 
wilh your keys. 

Girls: carry it in the pocket of 
your white blouse. 

f^lay football with it. — basketball, 
t:nnis, hockey. It's on the job the 
minute you want to write, without 
leaving a pinhead spot of ink any- 
where it has been carried. 

Write? Just imigine a pen of 
glass that melts to ink as you slide it 
across paper! That's the way it writes. 

Price $2.50 up. Get one on trial, 
lake It back any ti.-ne witlan 10 
days if you're not tickled to death 
with it. We authorize dr-aler to ro- 
tund. If your dealer docon't carry 
rarkers, write us for catalog lod^y. 

PARKER PEN COMPANY 
Mill St., Janesviile, Wis. 







For sale at the Bookroom. 



'28 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-Mlade Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 



North East Corner Centre Square, 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



JACOB FISHER 
Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, EUzabethtown, Penna. 

With you for 31 years. That's All 

E. H. LEHMAN 

COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED^ FLOUR. 

Telephone 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Bell and Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 

46 E. King St., Lancaster, Pa. 



CHOICE 



EATS 



A. K. Young 

BMZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



_f***4t*******-**ft*********A***** 



W. R. Ashenfelter 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied with 
Fancy Cakes at short notice. 



S. MARKET ST., EUZABETHTOWN, PA. Z 



FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
will convince. Work guaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown. Pa. 



Ind. Phone Hours 


i^A 

8 to 6 


DR. JEROME G. HESS V 


m 


DENTIST ■ 


M 


Hertzler BIdg. 11' 


ii 


Elizabethtown Pa. \j 

V , 


M 



Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 

Choice Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees, Fresh Country Butter and Eggs 

Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Penna 



We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen-, 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 



Y. M. C. A. Bldg., 



Lancaster, Pa. 



H. h. BRANDT 

Dealer in 

ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



Elizabethtown, - - Penna. T 

♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 



Mention Our College' Times When Writing. 



29 



THE ''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 



/^ 



'■% 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 

Shipped every Wednesday 



V 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



=^ 



STATIONERY, SCHOOL SUPPLIES 
POST CARDS 

We furnish everything in 

SPORTING GOODS and ATHlETIC 
SUPPLIES 

H. K. Dorsheimer 

Bell 'Phone 38-3 
On the Square, Ellzabethtown Pa. 



^m 




D. B. KLINE 

CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Ellzabethtown, Pa. 



John A. Fisher 



BARBER 



Centre Square, 



Elizabeth to w^n. Pa. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦»♦»»»»♦ ♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦» 

♦ ♦ 

♦ COLUMBIAN AND RED CROSS 



I 

Heaters and Ranges \ 



The Finest Lines Made 



Jos. H. Rider & Son 

f ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



GEO. A. FISHER 

HARDWARE 

Automobiles 
Pttonoyraphs and > 
Records 
F. P. GAS PLANTS 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - I'ENNA. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« ♦♦< ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

X ELIZABETHTOWN | 

} ROLLER MILLS j 



♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ ELIZABETHTOWN, 



J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades o( 

FLOUR AND FEED 

Highest Cash Prices paid for grain, 
bay and straw 

PEW A 



30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 



The Bee Hive Store 



South Market and Bainbridge Streets, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
,Dry Goods, Notions, Shoes, Carpets, Draperies and' an Up-to-Date line of 
Gent's and Ladies' Furnishings 

''SOMETHING NEW EVERY DAY" 




The Duplex 

Recommends Literary 
and Commercial teachers 
Secretaries and Account- 
ants. Schools for sale. 
Circurlars free. Write 
for further information. 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



D. C. BmNSER 



Coal 



Lunches Telephones 

D. W. MIESSE 

Baker and Confectioner 

123 N. Queen St. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Ice Cream Water Ice 



I Ursinus College | 

* 
* 



COLLEGEVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA ^ 



(24 miles from Philadelphia.) 



Grain, Flour, Feed, 
Seeds, Hay, Straw > 
and Fertilizer. > 



* 
* 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 

ft** A*4M5*A****** fcft Aftftftftftftftftftftft* 
A farmer once to a certain age r» 

,In the Lunch Room Business did en- ^ 
gage. ^ 

T'was Nissley. 
Thousands of people now are fed. 
Pure, delicious, quick. Enough said. 

TRY NISSLEY 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. 



«!• Organized and administered under the Group Sys- 4»- 

4» tern of Instruction, providing both liberal culture and 4» 

•!• special preparation for the various vocations, an 4»' 

4" arrar>gement presenting exceptional advantages for "i*' 

4* efficiency and economy All groups open to women •!» 

4* as well as men Write for special bulletin and 4»- 

4» descriptive pamphlet. "i*' 

T A. Edwin Keigwin D.D., President. X 

4» Geo. Leslie Omwake, Pd.D., Vice-Pres. 4* 



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♦ 
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♦ 

< 

♦ 
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♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 

♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦•♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦»♦♦♦♦ 



Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, 
Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic 
Shoes. Kodaks .and Cameras, de- 
veloping and finishing. 

H. B. H E R R 
30-32 West King Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 



♦ 

♦ 
♦ 

♦ 

t 

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♦ 









IF ITS MUSIC OR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, WE HAVE IT! 

IRirR Johnson S. Co. 

MUSIC HALL 
.16-18 West King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 

■iiniBiiiiBiiiiJHiiiiiiiiiHiiiJiaiiniaiiHiiiHiiiiiHiiiiBiyiiBiijaniiHiiiH^ 



Mention Our G)llege Times When Writing. 



31 



Mail Orders Solicited for | 
Books and Bibles 

I THE BOOK STORE 

I 

I C. N. FALKENSTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



fl^ainting anb (Paper /^ 
Ibanging 

AMOS B. DRACE 



Ind. "Phone. 



Bell 'Phone 



CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 

Catalogues a Specialty 

311 W. Grant St., LANCASTER, PA. 



S. G. CRAYBILL 



=^ 



c 



OLLEGE 




Dai 



RY 



%. 



Fresh milk and cream liaiiy. All milk 
tested forchildren; free from tuberculosis 

HOTBLS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED 



J 



REBER WAGONS! 

IS the cry of man and horse. The 
horse says "It pulls so easy" and the 
man says "It rides so nice and lasts 
£0 Icng." So come my neighbor, get 
yourself such an outfit and be pleased 
yet more than that. 

REBER WAGON WORKS 
Centreport, Pa. 



TAKE YOURj 



Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday moriimu. 
Returns Weduesdav and b'ridav afternoon. 



CALL AT 
RALPH GROSS SHAVING PARLOR 
Conducted on sanitary principles. 

Massaging a Specialty. 
Agency of First-Class Laundry. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



O. N. HEISEY I 

Provisions, Groceries, CBl> Choice Candies ^ 



:^ HEISEY RUII>DING 



BLIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. ^ 



^(f>'fwff>ffy(f>ff>^f\(f>ff>(fw(f>(f>ff\ff>^\ffy(f>'(f\(f>ffy'!^ 



32 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Elizabethtown Exchaiigk 

Bank 



Transacts a general banking business, pays in- 
terest on time deposits, solicits your patronage 



OFFICERS 



A. G. HEISEY, Pres. 



ACLEN a. rCOBLB. Vice Pies 



J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 



DIRECTORS 



A. G. Heisey Jos. G. Heisey B. H. Greider, H. J. Gisb 

Allen A. Coble Dr. H. K. Blough Henry E. Landis J. H. Buch 

Dr. A. m; Kalbach Geo. D. Boggs E. E. Hernly 



I P. N. Kraybill I 

2 Both 'Phones |J 

Rheems. - Penn'a t 

Dealer in JJ 

Groceries, Dry Goods, Notions, ^ 
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers ^ 

— $ 



Hardware, Paints, Oils, Turpen- 
tine and Glass 



^ Oilcloth, Linoleums, Matting, Win- 
dow Shades and Strips 



Soliciting a Share of Your Busin'ess » 



4..i,Hi:,i<B:I!II|i.|;IB;;|iIHIi 



ll!linilll!BI!il 



lilliW 



Warner's 

Corsets 

are the only corsets that are en- 
dorsed so fully and strongly to us. 

Guaranteed to shape fashion- 
ably, to fit comfortably, and not 
to rust, break or tear. 

You connot say any more in 
favor of a corset excepting to give 
its price — 

$1.00 to $2.00 Per Pair 

If we could say just the things 
that we say about Warner's Rust- 
Proof Corsets, it would make 
any corset worth while ; but 
WARNER'S are the only corsets 
we can make this absolute state- 
ment regardi'hg. c 

Huntzberger-Winters Co. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



IHII 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



"It's not what we say we do; 
It's what we do." 

How often have you read the promises of men? 

How often have you paid the penalty afterwards? . 

We often question the advisability of telling about 
the clothes we sell, for talk is cheap. However, there is 
only one way to interest the man who doesn't know us 
and that is to advertise. So, we are forced to use this 
method of getting in touch with you. 

This advertisement is not going to say a single word 
about our clothes. Its only object is to invite you to 
visit our shop. When you arrive here we'll show you. 

Can we hope to see you soon? 

"FOLLOW THE ARROW" TO 

S. M. MYERS & CO. 

CLOTHIERS — FURNISHERS — HATTERS 
12 East King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Hertzler's Department Store 




Black Cat 
Hosiery 



Your needs supplied at satisfactory prices in Dr/ 
Goods, Groceries, Ready-to-Wear Clothing tor Men. 
and Women of a 1 ares. Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oilcloti. 
Shoes, Etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Aients for Made-to-Measure 



CLOTHING 



Ir e:T.atic"al Tailoring Co., New York. 
A-xiG"ican Ladies Tailoring Co., Chicago. 
.c ^.ic Cr.r.-.;i2S on Hand. 



E^TZLEF<^ BROS. & CO. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA, 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 



nalBank 



Capital Surplus and Profits SIOZ^OOO.OO 



General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid on special 
deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 



DIRECTORS 



W. S. Smith 
F. W. GrolE 
E. C. Ginder 



Elmer W. Strickler 
J. S. Risser 
Amos G. Coble 



Peter N. Rutt 
B. U Geyer 
E. E. Cohle 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



' Carl Schlotzhauer 

The Students Cfficial 
Photographer 



: 



> 



• 



a 



Don't have your Pho- 
tos taken anywhere else 
or you will regret it. 

You are invited to vis- 
it our studio and notice 
the 1912 Photography, 
something new and differ- 
ent than you have ever 
seen before. 



a 



SPECIAL RATE TO STUDENTS 

163 N. Queen St. 

OPPOSITE HOTEL WHEATLAND 



>SA<MS/VV%VVVVVVV 



We Are Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made to Order 



Plain 
Clothing 

In This Country 

When in Lancastei' it will pay ^ 

you to visit ours, the only ^ 

Clothing Store in that city that ^ 

has One Price to All and gives ^ 

discounts to none. See us for ^L 

MEN'S READY MADE AND ^ 

MADE TO ORDER ^ 

Clothing 5 

AND ^ 

Furnishing < 



YOUTH'S AND BOYS' 
CLOTHING 



Hirsh & Bro 

Since 1854 at 

Centre Square, Next to City Hall 

LANCASTER, .PA, 



I 



^•^^A^ 




Q^T£^ 




COLLEGE HILL 5 

HOW ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE WAS 
FOUNDED 6 

THE EDUCATIONAL VALUE OF HISTORY 
12 

EDITORIAL 

IN THE EARLY DAYS 14 

SCHOOL NOTES 17 

FOUNDER'S DAY ANNIVERSARY . . 19 

BIBLE TERM, 1913 19 

K. L. S. AND HOMERIAN NEWS 20 

VALUE OF AN EDUCATION 21 

EXCHANGES 23 

ALUMNI 24 



ffiur QIoU^0? WmtB 



Vol. X Elizabkthtown, Pa., November, 1912 ^ No 2 



College Hill 



The bleak North wind unchecked by trellis, tree, or tower, 
Had year by year, for ages past, swept o'er the scene ; 

When loyal souls appeard who in a golden hour, 

Moved by a bright design, transformed the level green. 

They laid foundations deep with earnest, ardent prayer; 
Through patience and self-sacrifice they reared the walls. 

Then followed groves and walks and lawns and gardens fair; 
Within were cosy rooms, quaint nooks, and airv halls. 

Now on a winter's eve, with genial ray inviting. 

From many windows gleams the light of warmth, and cheer. 
Where students con the page to noble deed inciting, 

Wliile round the eaves the storm chants music to the ear. 
Here pure aspiring youths to higher life awaken, 

And treasure in this hive of industry rich store 
Of wisdom, virtue, truth, and faith in God unshaken. 

Which leads to service grand and bliss on heaven's shore. 

Green be the turf for aye on our dear college campus. 

And green the memory of the founders liege and brave ; 
May no reverse of fortune e'er in ardor damp us 

Or swerve us from the call lives to uplift and save. 
In colors blue and gray E'town shall shine resplendent. 

Disunion dies while waves this banner in the gale. 
Heaven bless our school ; long be her star in the ascendant ! 

We kiss thy shrine in reverence. Hail, Alma Mater, hail ! 

— Nescis. 



How Elizabethtown College Was Founded 



D. C. Reber, Pd. D. 



In response to a widely-extended 
written call issued by J. G. Francis, of 
Oaks, Pa., to meet at Reading, Pa., Nov- 
ember 29, 1898 to discuss the advisa- 
bility and feasibility of starting a new 
college in eastern Pennsylvania, there 
met in the Church of the Brethren at 
Reading on said date at ten o'clock 
A. M. twelve sisters and twenty-two 
brethren. The meeting was called to 
order at 10:15 by Brother J. G. Francis 
and the following organization was ef- 
fected : Eld. John Herr, of Myerstown, 
moderator; Elder G. N. Falkenstein, 
of Germantown, secretary. William 
M. Howe of Norristown conducted the 
opening exercises reading Psalms 117 
and part of Prov. 4. The assembly 
was led in prayer by Brother Howe, 
Elder H. E. Light, of Mountville clos- 
ing with the Lord's prayer. 

The moderator then stated the pur- 
pose of the meeting. J. G. Francis 
read correspondence from representa- 
tive Brethren relative to this project 
such as J. M. Mohler, Harrisburg; 
Mary Geiger, Philadelphia ; J. T. 
Myers, Oaks and Isaac Urner of Potts- 
town. This was followed by a call for 
the history of this movement. J. G. 
Francis replied by saying: "There is 
sentiment in favor of education among 
the Brethren in the eastern district of 
Pa. Many schools already exist in the 
brotherhood but a school of a higher 
standard is needed." Brother Francis 
then made a motion as follows : 'T 
move that we in the fear of God proceed 



to establish a school in eastern Pa." 
This motion was seconded by F. F. 
Holsopple, of Parkerford, Pa. At Eld. 
G. N. Falkenstein's suggestion the mo- 
tion was not put to a vote, in order to 
afiford a fuller discussion of this im- 
portant movement. J. G. Francis then 
argued the necessity of a school by say- 
ing that there are fourteen members' 
children at Juniata College from this 
district and ten times this number in 
outside schools. He said that there 
should be facilities to prepare ministers 
for our church ; that the Reformed 
Church has neglected this matter but 
that the Presbyterian Church has 
pushed the matter of educating her 
ministers. G. N. Falkenstein stated 
that the district has a membership of 
six thousand and about four thousand 
families of brethren and about twelve 
hundred children. F. F. Holsopple 
asked, "Is a school wanted? Can we 
afford it?" He also discussed the cost 
of such a school and the location of it. 
Elder J. H. Longenecker, of Palmyra, 
said, "I favor education. However we 
are not united on this question. Much 
prejudice exists against education. 
Our people are not properly represent- 
ed at this meeting." William M. 
Howe and F. F. Holsopple stated that 
Juniata College started with three 
pupils. They argued that a large num- 
ber was not necessary to undertake the 
work. 

An afternoon session was held at the 
same place but the attendance was 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



I 



smaller than in the forenoon Elder 
H. E. Lioht expressed his views as 
follows: "I want to place myself on 
record on this question. We cannot 
educate too much. Our children 
should be educated and if possible re- 
ceive a classical education. We know 
the influence of sectarian schools on 
our children. There are not too many 
schools, ^^'e need a school up to the 
standard of church loyalty. The only 
problem is a properly conducted 
school." The secretary of the meeting 
insisted on further discussion while 
several Brethren contended strongly to 
decide upon building the proposed 
school. T. G. Francis read a paper 
from Ephrata favoring the location of 
the new school at that place. E. B. 
Lefever and Samuel Kulp said that the 
Ephrata peoole were interested, that it 
was talked about on the streets and in 
the st'ires. that all necessary land could 
be P"(itten free, that five thousand 
dollars cmkl be raised for the school. 
He mentioned the advantages of the 
place, that there was much outside 
pressure to locate the school at this 
place, that a larger school could be 
built there and better than Juniata. 
G. X. Falkcnstein made the point that 
it was important to have the sympathy 
of the town for the school, citing 
certain western towns that were the 
product oi a college founded there. 
The moderator said : "A good school is 
needed." Elder Jacob Gotwalls, grand- 
father of J. G. Francis, said : "The pro- 
posed school would be a good thing to 
unify the district." A motion was then 
passed that a committee of five be elect- 
ed by ballot to take preliminary steps 
for finding a location to establish a 
Brethren School in this district and re- 
port at a future meeting. The com- 



mittee elected by ballot was: John 
Herr, J. H. Longenecker, H. E. Light, . 
G. N. Falkenstein, Elias Lefever. This 
committee was instructed to decide a 
time and place for the next public meet- 
ing. J. G. Francis upon request closed 
the meeting with devotional exercises. 
The above named committee organized 
after the meeting by electing John 
Herr, Chairman. G. N. Falkenstein, 
Secretary. 

Another school meeting independent 
of the Reading meeting was called by 
J. G. Francis at Norristown, February 
22, 1899. Apparently the purpose of 
the meeting was to locate the proposed 
school at Xorristown. This meeting 
met in the Brethren church at 10 A. M. 
with A. L. Grater, moderator; J. G. 
Francis, secretary. Various speeches 
were made in favor of Xorristown as 
the location and a few were made op- 
posing it. J. G. Francis stated that 
Tremont Seminary in Xorristown 
could be bought for twenty-five thous- 
and dollars. G. X. Falkenstein, sec- 
retary of the Reading meeting, being 
present, was called upon, as a repre- 
sentative of the locating committee, 
for information regarding" their work 
but he was unal^le to give any definite 
information at that time regarding a 
place for the school. There was a 
forenoon and afternoon session and a 
few decisions were made ; but since 
there were no practical results, further 
details of this meeting are not necess- 
ary. x\mong those present at this 
meeting were: J. H. Ellis, E. C. 
Harley, Eli Cassel, B. F. Kittinger, 
J. T. Myers, W. S. Price, T. T. Myers. 
C. C. Ellis, W. M. Howe in addition 
to those already mentioned. 

The locating committee appointed by 
the Reading meeting underwent some 



8 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



important changes. The chairman, 
John Herr, resigned in February, 1899 
on account of ill health. In his stead 
the committee elected S. H. Hertzler, 
of Elizabethtown. J. H. Longenecker 
also handed his resignation to the com- 
mittee but the reason seemed in- 
sufficient to grant it. Through corres- 
pondence by the officials of the com- 
mitte Mountville was proposed as 
a meeting place for the committee on 
March 6, 1899. The object of this 
meeting was to visit school sites. S. 
H. Hertzler was notified of his election 
on this committee on March the first 
and accepted the position. Four mem- 
bers of the committee met at Mount- 
Aalle on March 6 at 10:00 A. M., being 
reorganized as follows : H. E. Light, 
chairman ; G. N. Falkenstein, secretary. 
The other members of the committee 
present were S. H. Hertzler, E. B. Le- 
fever. The following places were visit- 
ed in their order: Mountville, Colum- 
bia, Pottstown, Ephrata, Xorristown. 
and a month or so later Elizabethtown. 
Through correspondence with Elder 
S. R. Zug of Mastersonville, permission 
was granted to have a public meeting 
of the Brethren interested in the school 
movement, in the Brethren Church at 
Elizabethtown on April 5. All church- 
es of the district were notified of this 
meeting on March 23. On the date 
named the meeting convened at 9:30 
opened with devotional exercises by the 
secretary of the Committee. The offi- 
cers of the committee took charge of 
the meeting until after the organization 
A committee of five brethren appointed 
by Chariman H. E. Light, ofifered the 
following nominations for officers for 
this meeting which were ratified by it: 
chairman, S. R. Zug; secretary, G. N. 
Falkenstein ; treasurer, S. H. Hertzler. 



Elder Zug made a brief address, and 
then called for the report of the locating 
committee which was read by the sec- 
retary. Representatives of the follow- 
ing places made offers to the meeting 
for the location of the college : Mount- 
ville, represented b}^ H. E. Light; 
Columbia by H. E. Light and B. G. 
Musser; Ephrata by A. W. Mentzer; 
Norristown also applied but had no 
speaker; Pottstown, represented by 
J. G. Francis ; Elizabethtown, repres- 
ented by F. H. Keller wdio read a paper 
from the town council. 

In the afternoon session Elder Geo. 
Bucher called for information by what 
authority this meeting is called. J. G. 
Francis stated how it originated in his 
mind. The secretary, G. N. Falken- 
stein spoke of the sentiment for a 
school throughout the district. The 
meeting then was declared open for 
further discussion of the following 
questions: i. Shall we have a school? 
2. \\niat kind of school do we want to 
establish? Various speeches were 
made in reply to these cjuestions. 
George Bucher said, "I am in favor of 
a Brethren school on Gospel principles 
but it must be subject to the church. 
It must be located in a local church." 
S. H. Hertzler said, "If some schools 
are improperly managed, we need one 
that is properly managed. Our preach- 
ing has changed." After some further 
discussion George Bucher moved that 
we have a school. This was seconded 
by Elder Jesse Ziegler, of Royersford 
and was unanimously passed. The 
next question to be decided was: 
What kind of a school shall it be? S. 
R. Zug said, "Co-educational for young 
people." George Bucher said. "For the 
old ones too. We want a hig"her school. 
A college to compare favorably with 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



any in the country. A safe school." 
J. G. Francis said : "We want a school 
in which the Bible is the textbook ; 
also offering scientific and classical 
courses." L. M, Keim said ; "The new 
school shall have an agricultural de- 
partment." Jesse Zeigler favored this 
also. G. X. Falkenstein said: "We 
need a commercial department also." 
After further discussion, G. N. Falken- 
stein moved that we establish a school 
of such a character as compares favor- 
ably with any of our best schools, in- 
cluding Bible, academic and collegiate 
departments ; a school to be at the same 
time a home and a church. This motion 
was passed by the meeting. 

The meeting then decided that a 
committee of ten be appointed to be 
fully authorized to select a site for the 
location of a school. This com- 
mittee consisted of H. E. Light, 
G. N. Falkenstein, S. H. Hertz- 
ler, George Bucher, Jesse Ziegler, 
S. R. Zug, J. G. Francis, Abram Royer, 
Benjamin Hottel and William Ober- 
holtzer. This committee was also to 
draft a constitution and by-laws for 
the new school and present the same at 
a future meeting. This committee de- 
cided to meet at district meeting for 
organization on April 20. At that time 
the organization resulted as follows: 
chairman, H. E. Light ; secretary, G. N. 
Falkenstein ; treasurer, S. H. Hertzler. 
At this meeting of the committee it was 
stated that all offers of different towns 
were to be in the committee's hands by 
May the tenth and that meantime 
Lititz's offer should be investigated. 

The next meeting of the locating 
committee was held at the Annual 
Conference at Roanoke, Virginia, May 
24, 1899. The following; of the com- 
mittee of ten were present : H. E. Light, 



S. R. Zug', George liucher, S. H. Hertz- 
ler, G. X. Falkenstein, and J. G. 
I^Yancis. William Oberholtzer having 
resigned, H. B. Hollinger was elected 
in his stead. After devotional exer- 
cises and stating the purpose of the 
meeting, it was moved and seconded 
that sealed offers for the new school be 
read and that a majority of the com- 
mittee be required to decide the loca- 
tion of the school. There were only 
two offers presented, namely, Ephrata 
and Elizabethtown. Questions were 
asked and a detailed discussion of the 
advantages offered by these places were 
considered from the following five 
points : Drainage, railroad facilities, 
money, church, water. Three ballots 
were cast without any decision. The 
places voted for were Mountville, 
Elizabethtown, and Pottstown. Fol- 
lowing some speech making in favor of 
Pottstown and Elizabethtown, it was 
unanimously voted to locate at Eliza- 
bethtown. The following sub-com- 
mittee was appointed to prepare a con- 
stitution and by-laws for the school : 
G. N. Falkenstein, Jesse Ziegler, J. G. 
Francis. The committee decided to 
meet at Elizabethtown, June 7 for 
another public meeting, the committee 
to meet the day before. 

The committee on Constitution and 
By-laws met at Royersford, Pa., June 
I. All were present. This committee 
recommended that the name of this 
school be Conestoga College. After a 
day's work, the work of the committer 
was completed. The locating com- 
mittee met at Elizabethtown, June 6 
at noon. The following were present: 
H. E. Light, chairman; G. N. Falken- 
stein, secretary ; S. H. Hertzler, treas- 
urer : S. R. Zug, George Bucher, 
Abram Royer, J. G. Francis, and 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Jesse Zieg-ler. A formal protest was 
received from Ephrata in regard to 
locating the school at Elizabethtown 
and an informal protest was received 
in behalf of Pottstown. It was then 
moved and decided to reconsider the 
location. It was also decided not to 
admit new oflfers for the school unless 
open to all upon due notice. Three 
minutes time was allowed each rep- 
resentative for presenting a school 
site. H. E. Light spoke in favor of 
Mountville ; S. R. Zug in favor of Eliza- 
bethtown ; Abram Royer in favor of 
Ephrata ; J. G. Francis in favor of 
Pottstown. On the third ballot eight 
votes were cast in favor of Elizabeth- 
town. The committee then adjourn- 
ed to view several sites around Eliza- 
bethtown after which they met at the 
home of S. H. Hertzler at 2:30 in the 
afternoon where the citizen's commit- 
tee also met with the locating commit- 
tee. Many speeches were made in favor 
of two sites, one at the east end of town 
and the other at the west end. After 
some balloting which did not decide 
the location, many warm speeches were 
made and the matter was left undecid- 
ed until the public meeting on the 
following day. This committee then 
took up the report of the committee on 
Constitution and By-laws. The name 
proposed by the Committee on Con- 
stitution and By-laws provoked con- 
siderable discussion. The name of 
Mack College was presented by J. G. 
Francis. George Bucher opposed this 
name on account of its being the name 
of a man, but liked Conestoga College. 
H. E. Light thought Conestoga College 
was too local a name for the school. 
Jesse Ziegler presented the name East 
Penn College. There was a motion to 
adopt this name but failed to pass, 



Finally the name Conestoga College 
which was proposed by the Committee 
on Constitution and By-laws was pass- 
ed by the Locating Committee. There 
were slight changes made in the state- 
ment of the object of the school but in 
the main, the constitution and by-laws 
were adopted by the Locating Com- 
mittee, 

On Wednesday morning. June 5, 
the Locating Committee had another 
session at 7 o'clock prior to the pub- 
lic meeting which convened at 9 130 in 
the Brethren Church. Devotional 
exercises were conducted by George 
Bucher. The minutes of the former 
public meeting were read. The decis- 
ion of the Locating Com. as to the 
site of the new school was announced. 
The constitution and by-laws were also 
presented for the consideration of the 
meeting. After a long discussion on 
the name question, it was decided to 
adopt the name of Elizabethtown Col- 
lege instead of Conestoga College as 
proposed by the Locating Committee. 
After taking up each section of the con- 
stitution, and after considerable dis- 
cussion of a few articles, it was adopted 
and the meeting proceeded to elect 
trustees, brethren and sisters voting by 
ballot. The committee on location 
nominated the following persons to 
serve as trustees : From Lancaster 
county, S. H. Hertzler, J. H. Rider, H. 
E. Light, George Bucher. C. R. Gibbel, 
I. W. Taylor, T. F. Imler ; from Berks 
County, P. C. Nyce ; from Montgom- 
ery County, Jesse Ziegler; from 
Lebanon County, F. L. Reber; from 
Chester County, Nathan Hoffman; 
from Philadelphia, T. T. Myers, G. N. 
Falkenstein ; from Maryland, L. R. 
Brumbaugh, J. Y. King : from Dau- 
phin county, M. R. Henry, John Landis. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



While the votes were being counted 
for trvistees, George Bucher moved to 
insert a clause in the constitution and 
by-laws prohibiting instrumental mu- 
sic. The meeting however, decided to 
leave this matter out of the constitu- 
tion and in the hands of the trustees. 
The by-laws were then read and adopt- 
ed after which the tellers made the 
following report of the election of trus- 
tees for three years: G. N. Falken- 
stein, Jesse Ziegler, S. H. Hertzler; for 
two years, J. H. Rider, Nathan Hoff- 
man, M. R. Henry; for one year, P. C. 
Nyce. T. F. Imler. L. R. Brumbaugh. 
It was then also decided by motion that 
the trustees be authorized to call a 



meeting of the contributors whenever 
deemed necessary. After adopting 
the constitution and by-laws as a whole 
unanimously, the meeting closed at 
five o'clock. The committees on loca- 
tion and constitution and by-laws were 
then formally discharged and the meet- 
ing closed with devotional exercises. 
Thus Elizabethtown College was 
founded. The writer is indebted to 
Elder G. N. Falkenstein of Elizabetli- 
town for the detailed data of the fore- 
going article, he having been secretary 
of all the committees and of the three 
public meetings that were held until 
the school was formally founded. 




The Educational Value of History 



H. H. Nye, '15. 



In history the child gets a view of all 
that has been done by man ; it receives 
an adequate conception of all that the 
human race has achieved. What a sad 
fact that so many of us have scanned 
the pages of history without appreciat- 
ing its value to ourselves and not even 
the significance of the nolsle characters 
portrayed in the text ! Alany a young 
student who has studied history has re- 
garded it as a "memory-stuffing pro- 
cess" and could never read "between 
the lines" its meaning and worth. 
Many teachers are teaching history 
without obtaining any w^orthy results 
and whose efiforts are spent in vain. 
It is true that it cannot be taught with- 
out acquiring some value from it, but it 
is only the teacher who has a knowl- 
edge of the philosophy and meaning of 
history, and who can present its clear 
meaning to his pupils and have them 
understand it, whose pupils receive the 
full educational value of history. We 
shall therefore regard the teaching of 
history as having three values : a 
psychological value, a sociological or 
practical value, and a moral value. 

The psychological value of history 
is realized in the fact that it quickens 
the imagination and trains judgment. 
In the first place the child must picture 
the scenes portrayed in history. He 
must image the circumstances of life, 
the dress of the people, the customs, 
the educational facilities, and the ad- 
vancement in the arts and sciences as 
they existed at the time designated. 



If the child does not picture history in 
this way, it cannot grasp the meaning 
of it. It must relive the incidents of 
the past to enter into the feelings of the 
time. To understand the battle of 
Gettysburg or Lexington, the battle of 
W^aterloo or the French Revolution, 
the child must exercise an active im- 
agination. He must imagine himself 
in the very midst of the din and strife. 

The training of judgment is occasion- 
ed through history. As stated before, 
history should not be simply a memory 
study. While this is essential, yet the 
pupil's power of assimilation must be 
exercised. A mere knowledge of facts 
is of no value, and only as the pupil sees 
one. fact as related to other facts, will it 
be beneficial to him. He should be 
able to trace the cause to the effect or 
vice versa and understand the relations. 
Questions should be asked by the teach- 
er that will call into play the thought 
powers of the mind. 

Furthermore, from a sociological 
standpoint, the student learns that he is 
a part of a great social whole and that 
society is made up of a large number 
of individuals. We see how society 
works in a body through the means of 
co-operation and organization. Here 
and there rise up the more prominent 
men who are destined to be the world's 
leaders and whose mission it is to 
direct the world's activities in the pro- 
per direction. These are the men who 
have made possible the progress of the 
race, who have carried the banner of 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



truth and righteousness, who, under 
this banner, have struggled to advance 
new principles and sacrificed their time 
and energy — and ni many cases their 
lives — that their fellowmen might be 
lifted to a higher plane of living. These 
men have brought into existence the 
institutions of society that have oc- 
casioned the development of the race. 
These men of such great achievements 
have transmitted to their posterity the 
blessings of life and liberty and have 
made this twentieth century the golden 
age of modern civilization. 

The students who can see beneath 
these movements of history these great 
sociological principles and their full 
significance will be uplifted morally 
and spiritually. He sees the ideals of 
the various epochs of history, the aims 
(^f the world's magnanimous leaders, 
and he himself becomes eager to share 
in the heritage of glory. Hence he 
is being trained for citizenship. Thus 
history is a means which the school 
may employ in reaching its goal — 
training for life. A broad knowledge 
of history will awaken and foster a 
healthy national pride and lofty 
patriotism. 

From a political standpoint a know- 
ledge of history is important. We 
learn the failures as well as the success- 
es of various peoples from time to tmie. 
We learn the efifect of the political. 



moral, and religious principles advanc- 
ed at difi'erent times. A knowledge of 
these efifects is valuable in our modern 
legislation. We can sift out the prin- 
ciples that have stood the test and 
eliminate the weaker ones. What an 
aid a knowledge of history would be to 
our people today in the burning ques- 
tion of democracy ! 

Lastly, history is valuable in the 
formation of character. History deals 
with the will, and a completely fash- 
ioned will is the crowning element of 
character. As stated before, we are con- 
stantly dealing with ideals in history. 
These ideals, through which character 
is built up, linger in the imagination, 
and finally weave themselves into the 
moral fiber. Parents and teachers 
should use the best illustrations of his 
tory and biography — and especially 
Bible history — for the purpose of shap- 
ing the morals of the child. Short 
anecdotes of the lives of our great men 
are invaluable for ethical training. 
Many of our great men pay great 
tribute to loving parents and owe their 
succe. s in a large measure to them. 
Let r.s 'then n t forget in our teaching 
1.1 ; i: !\v ih ; p'lpil tie h •v.->q principles 
lying l^ack of valor and statesmanship. 
\\ !:a'- '.he .':"?-'^";;.ation con inually rou- 
te;:. pi. t >, fi.a cs '.ur (i^ais ..; ..ii)-e 




EDITORIAL BOARD. 

RALPH W. SCULOSSER, '11, Editor in-Chief 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 



Orville Z. Becker, '15 School Notes 

NoHA L. Kebeb, '11 Horaerian News 

Mary Scheafkek, 13: K. L. S. News 

Leah Sheaefer, '09 Alumni Notes 



C. L. Martin, '18 Exchaiiires 

J. D. Rebeh, '14 Bus. Mer. 

A. L. Reber, '13 Asst. Bus Msrr. 

Daisy P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



Our College Tinaes is published monthly during the Academic year by Eiizabethtown College. 

Arrearage on subscription tn this paper is charged. 

Report any change of address to the Business .Manager. 

Subscription rates: — Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy; five years for $2.00. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Eiizabethtown Postottice. 



In the Early Days. 
Since there is no permanent record 
of the first few years of the history of 
EHzabethtown College we deem it 
proper to insert in this issue an 
account of the early days of the college. 
Dr. Reber in his article on the Found- 
ing of Eiizabethtown College has trac- 
ed the movement that resulted in the 
establishing of our institution in this 
town. We shall state the main hap- 
penings of the first few years after the 
founding of the school. Almost all of 
the details of the following sketch were 



kindly given to us by Miss Elizabeth 
Myer, who was one of the first instruc- 
tors in the college, and who has pre- 
served some data that would otherwise 
have been lost. 

After the Board of Trustees had de- 
cided to build a college at Elizabeth- 
town, a site was chosen on the eastern 
side of the town. This land was own- 
ed by Mr. B. G. Grofif, who was one of 
the most active promoters of the cause 
of education. Through his generosity 
fourteen acres were cut ofi his farm for 
a school site. Ten of these fourteen 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



acres were donated and for the rest 
payment was made. Meanwhile an ap- 
pHcation had been filed for a charter. 
This was secured September 23, 1899. 
During the winter months the P)oard of 
Trustees were busy drawing up plans 
for the erection of a college building. 
By spring the way seemed clear en- 
ough to proceed and on July 10, 1900 
ground was broken for Alpha Hall. 

Not only was the Board active on the 
building project but also on the hiring 
of teachers, and as a result one teacher, 
at least, was hired before ground was 
broken for the erection of a building. 
The following August of this same 
year appeared that little blue catalog of 
Elizabethtown College. It stated that 
school would open Tuesday, November 
13, 1900. The faculty was as follows: 
Principal, I. N. H. Beahm ; G. N. Fal- 
kenstein ; Elizabeth Myer ; J. A. Seese. 
Miss Myer was preceptress, a position 
which she has held ever since ; and J. A. 
Seese. preceptor. The following cours- 
es were offered ; Teachers" Course, Lit- 
erary Course, Bible Course, and Com- 
mercial Course. Other courses v«-ere 
contemplated but not offered. 

\\nien the day for opening school 
came the building on College Hill was 
not ready for occupancy and conse- 
quently temporary quarters had to be 
secured. The building to receive this 
honor was Heisey's Auditorium Ic^cated 
on the corner of South Market and 
Bainbridge Streets. Here the school 
was formally opened on Tuesday. Nov- 
ember 13, at half past one by the rendi- 
tion of the following program : 

Scripture Reading and Prayer — Eld. 
S. R. Zug. 

Address — Representing the Board of 
Trustees — Jesse Ziegler. 



Address— Representing the Patrons 
I. X. S. Will 

Address— Representing the Citizens 

F. H. Keller 

Address — Representing the Faculty 

G. N. Falkenstein 

Address — Our Needs — S. H. Hertz- 
ler 

Voluntary Remarks. 

After this program was given, the 
enrollment of students began. The 
following six persons reported for 
work: Kurwin David Henrv, Warren 
Ziegler, Rufas Bucher, John Boll, 
Willis Heisey, and Walter Kittinger. 

The first lady student t-o enter Eliza- 
bethtown College was Miss Anna 
Brenneman, who enrolled during the 
winter. 

On account of the illness of the prin- 
cipal, I. N. H. Beahm. G. N. Falken- 
stein acted as principal for the ensuing 
year as well as for two additional years. *? 

After one week of scho.^l on the third "* 
floor of the Heisey Building, it w^as de- 
cided to move the school to Mr. J. H. 
Rider's pri^'ate dwelling just construct- 
ed on Washington Street. This build- 
ing stands aside of the church of the 
Brethren. In this residence the school 
held its sessions for two months. By 
this time some of the rooms in Alpha 
Hall were ready for use and on January 
22, 1901 recitations were heard for the 
first time on College Hill. 

AA^ork on the building was about 
completed as ^larch came on, and so a 
program was arranged for March 4 to 
celebrate the dedication of Alpha Hjall. 
The dedicatory sermon was preached 
by Eld. S. R. Zug. The next red-letter 
day in the history of the school was 
April 6. On this day over two hund- 
red and fifty shade and fruit trees were 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



planted under the supervision of Eld. 
T. F. Imler. Miss Anna Brenneman, 
the first lady student at the college, 
planted the first maple tree on the cam- 
pus. That tree is the first maple along 
the ladies' walk in front of Alpha Hall. 
Supt. M. J. Brecht also assisted in the 
planting of a number of trees. 

Because of the growth of the school, 
the trustees saw fit to erect another 
building. Action was taken in Jan- 
uary, 1905 to build a four-story brick 
building and in the course of a year the 
building was practically completed. 
It was dedicated ]\Iarch 4, 1906. The 
dedicatory sermons were preached by 
Elds. J. H. Longenecker and John 
Herr. Several names were proposed 
for the building, such as "Chapel 
Building" and "Memorial Building," 
but it was finally named Memorial 
Hall. 

The Cottage was built in 1903 so as 
to afford a convenient home for the 
families of the teachers. 

The growth of Elizabethtown Col- 
lege during the first decade of her 



history was rapid and can be best seen 
by a comparison of the first catalogs. 
First Year — Four Teachers — 27 
Students. 

Second Year — Five Teachers — 64 
Students. 

Third Year — Five Teachers —108 
Students. 

Fourth Year — Six Teachers — 106 
Students. 

Fifth Year — Nine Teachers — 128 
Students. 

Sixth Year — Eleven Teachers —148 
Students. 

Seventh Year — Twelve Teachers 
177 Students. 

Eighth Year — Fifteen Teachers 
196 Students. 

Ninth Year — Seventeen Teachers 
183 Students. 

Tenth Year — Fifteen Teachers 
188 Students. 

Eleventh Year — Fifteen Teachers 
204 Students. 

W|e hope the school may continue to 
grow and ever be a cherished spot to 
those who receive instruction withia 
its walls. 



.^§>^i^C^ 




s 



School Notes. 

Yellow, mellow, ripened days. 

Sheltered in a golden coating; 
O'er the dreamy listless haze. 

White and dainty cloudlets floating; 
Winking at the blushing trees, 

And the sombre, furrowed fallow ; 
Smiling at the airy ease 

Of the southward flying swallow. 
Sweet and smiling are thy ways, 

Beauteous, golden Autumn days. 
\\'ill Carleton. 

Summer has gathered up her robes 
•of glory, and like a dream of beauty 
with its magnificently tinted flower 
with its magnificiently tinted flower 
garden, blossoming under the spell of 
the enchanter, and yielding its rich and 
bounteous harvest. 

Douglas Jerrold says, "Grumblers 
deserve to be operated upon surgically ; 
their trouble is usually chronic." The 
exhilarating and beautiful Autumn 
days we have had so far have been an 
excellent incentive to good fellowship 
and hard study since no such opera- 
tions have been performed thus far. 

J\Iiss Leah Sheaffer gave an instruc- 



H 















t 



L 



S 



five Chapel talk on "Exercise" on 

September 27. 

Last week Prof. J. G. Meyer visited 
one our former teachers, C. E. Resser. 

On October 4, Miss Kathryn Miller 
gave our annual talk on "Table 
Etiquette." 

Prof, (in literature class) :"Why was 
Bunyan's style of writing so simple? 
Miss G. M. "Because only when he had 
something to say, then he said it." 

On October 5, Mr. Laban W. Leiter 
left "College Hill" to visit some friend 
in York County. 

Prof. Schlosser delivered a Temper- 
ance Sermon on Octcber 6, at Hoern- 
erstown, Lebanon County. On Oct- 
ober 19, he attended the Love-feasts at 
Latimore, Adams County and at 
Harrisburg. 

The fact has been brought to our 
notice that Mr. HolTman finished 
trimming the trees in the College or- 
chard just as the watermelon season 
closed. 

If any reader doubts that Mr. George 
Nefif could not become a good nurse 
then skepticism would disappear if they 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



saw him taking care of baby Mildred 
Meyer. 

Rev. Jones who represents the Rock 
Hill Seminary, an institution for col- 
ored people in South Carolina, paid his 
annvial visit to the college last week. 

Erma Kough, a former student, vis- 
ited Miss Leah Sheafifer. 

Mr. Waltz, who was home recently, 
reports that he heard Clinton Howard, 
one of the most eloquent lecturers in 
the temperance cause, deliver his popu- 
lar lecture, "The World's First Man." 

Miss Mary Waltz, a sister of our 
student, B. F. Waltz, and Miss Viola 
Buck who were delegates sent from the 
United Brethren church at Lancaster 
to the County Christian Endeavor Con- 
vention held in the L^nited Brethren 
church of this town, paid a visit to the 
college. 

Mr. L., while studying German con- 
fided the following to a friend : "It 
would be quite a coincidence if the 
German word for love would be 
'Mamie" instead of 'Minne.' 

This school year finds the Mission- 
ary Reading Circle far in advance of 
the one of last year. The class that 
was started this year had to be divided 
into two parts on account of the num- 
ber enrolled and the interest manifest- 
ed. The beginners' class is under the 
care of our former teacher. Miss Lydia 
StaufTer. This class is studying the 
book entitled "Helpful Workers in 
Needy Fields." The advanced class 
studying "The Uplift of China," is un- 
der the supervision of Mr. B. F. Waltz. 
Great interest is shown in both classes 
and we hope that much missionary 
spirit will be carried into the commu- 
nities where these students live. 

Ober Morning who was one of the 



first students of Elizabethtown College 
and who recently graduated at Yale, 
has been appointed to the chair of Eng- 
lish Literature at the Hill School, 
Pottstown, Pa. 

Mr. Kulp (in the dining room) in- 
stead of saying: "Mr. Nefif, please pass 
the cake," kindly asked : "Mr. Cake., 
please pass the NefT." 

After chapel exercises on October 9,. 
was the time set apart for "Private 
Talks" to our young men and young 
women. An excellent introduction to^ 
these talks was given by Dr. D. C. Reb- 
er during Chapel exercises on "Our 
Life." He presented its opportvmities- 
and pitfalls and also some factors relat- 
ing to success or failure. Miss Stauff- 
cr delivered the principal address to the 
ladies and Dr. Reber to the gentlemen. 
During these talks very important and 
wholesome advice was given on sub- 
jects not often found in books, but 
which Elizabethtown College deems 
among the most important elements of 
a true, well-rounded education. 

Just as we go to press the sorrowful 
news of the death of Aunt Annie, the 
wife of Eld. S. H. Hertzler, comes to 
us. Mrs., Hertzler greatly endeared 
herself to all at College Hill because 
of her sweet disposition. Although 
she has passed to the Great Beyond, 
yet she will always live in our minds 
and be a source of inspiration to us 
because of her noble life. Our sincer- 
est sympathies are tendered to our dear 
Eld. Hertzler. 

The call of the Bull Moose is inter- 
mingled with the braying of the Donk- 
ey on College Hill, but no Elephant's 
roar has thus far been heard. Our 
"politicians" are anxiously awaiting 
the eventful day of November 5. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



Elizabethtovvn College had its an- 
nual chestnut outing on October 12th 
in the woods along the North Ridge 
road about three miles northeast of 
town. Although the sky was overcast 
in the morning it turned out to be an 
excellent day for the excursion. The 
school left the College Campus at half- 
past eight o'clock. The lunch was 
served in the woods at one o'clock. 
The time was seemingly very pleasant- 
ly spent by all ; some engaging in 
games, others in base ball, while some 
went in search of the coveted chest- 
nuts, of which the amount found could 
easily be counted. A striking change 
from that of other years was the ab- 
sence of our preceptress from the num- 
ber, an occurrence which never hap- 
pened before in the history of the 
school. 

My birthday ! — what a different sound 

That word had in my youthful ears ; 

And how each time the day comes 

'round. 

Less and less white its mark appears. 

— Moore. 

On October 14 Mr. Waltz's twenty- 
ninth (?) birthday was celebrated by 
■a. sumptuous feast at Miss Staufifer's 
table. It may be of interest to know 
that Mr. Waltz's birthday is in May in- 
stead of October, a fact which was 
seemingly unknown to most of the 
members of that table. Although this 
was a sad attempt to reach the truth 
yet it was an occasion enjoyed by all 
Its participants. Mr. Waltz very grate- 
fully accepted this timely honor 
shown him by giving a speech in Ger- 
man. After finishing his speech, Miss 
StaufTer, who does not understand Ger- 
man, inquired, "Was he talking or only 
sighing?" 



Miss Mary SheafTer was called home 
a few days on account of the sickness 
of her mother but she is back again at 
school. 

Miss Orpha Kuhns who was a stu- 
dent at the College last year, paid a 
visit to College Hill on October 22. 

Mr. Henry Brandt helped to swell 
the number that did due justice to a 
duck dinner at his uncle's home on Oc- 
tober 20. 



Founders' Day Anniversary. 

The Twelfth Anniversary of the 
Founding of Elizabethtown College 
occurs on November 13, but owing to 
the Ministerial Meeting of Eastern 
Pennsylvania, occuring at that time, 
the committee having charge of this 
occasion has decided to postpone the 
anniversary exercises one week. 

Accordingly we invite all our school 
friends, alumni, and the general pub- 
lic to be present on November 20 to 
hear the program of exercises in com- 
memoration of this event. There will 
be selections of music, an oration, and 
a reading, and the chief feature will be 
an address by Supt. L. E. McGinnis, of 
Steelton. Pa. His subject on this oc- 
casion will be "Wholesome Education- 
al Agencies." 

There will be no admission fee 

charged but the committee asks for a 
silver offering to pay expenses. Come 

friends, help to make this occasion a 
pleasant and memorable one, and be- 
sides hear an address by an educator 
of local and state-wide reputation. 



Bible Term of 1913. 

A ten day session of special Bible 
study will occur this year January 15 
to 24, at which time Eld. J. G. Royer of 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Mount Morris, Illinois, will teach sev- 
eral periods daily and also preach each 
evening. Elder J. Kurtz Miller, of 
Brooklyn, will be with us again to 
teach two periods daily also. Elder 
Wilbur B. Stover, the first Brethren 
Missionary to India, now on furlough, 
is also expected to be with us part of 
the time to speak on Missionary 
themes. Several of the regular mem- 
bers of the faculty will jilso give in- 
struction along the line of Sunday 
School work, music, etc. 

In addition to the daily class work, 
there will be special programs in Edu- 
cational, Sunday Scliool, and Mission- 
ary work. 

Look for further particulars in the 
next issue of Our College Times. 



K. L. S. News. 

The Keystone Literary Society met 
in regular executive session on Friday 
evening, September 27. Two persons 
made application to become active 
members of our society. The program 
then rendered was as follows : 

Music — "Oh Pleasant Eventide," by 
Misses Moyer and Dennis. 

Declamation — "The Quaker and the 
Robber," by Mr. H. M. Eberly. 

"The Bull Aloose Party Leader." by 
Mr. G.C.Neff. 

Music — "O'er the Waters," by a 
Mixed Quartet. 

Debate — "Resolved, That Immigra- 
tion into the United States Should be 
A])olished." The affirmative speakers 
were: Miss Helen Kline and Mr. E. G. 
Diehm ; the negative : Miss Lilian 
Becker and Mr. C. J. Rose. 

Music — Vocal solo, by Mr. C. L. 
Martin. 

On Friday evening, October 4, the 
Keystoners met in Literary session. 



The following program was rendered: 

Music — "October's Party," by Misses 
Wenger, Brubaker and IMoyer. 

Declamation — "Lincoln's Gettys- 
burg Address," by Mr. John Graham. 

Music — "My Country "Tis of Thee,"" 
by the Society. 

Referred Question — "Flies," by Miss- 
Ella Ebersole. 

Debate— "Resolved that the Penn- 
sylvania German Dialect Should Never 
Have been Spoken." The affirmative 
speakers were : Miss Grace Moyer and 
Mr. Owen Hershey ; the negative : Miss; 
Sarah Replogle and Mr. Henry Brandt. 
The judges decided in favor of the neg- 
ative. In the general debate which fol- 
lovv'ed loyalty was shown for the good 
old Pennsylvania German. The main' 
object to the dialect was," the hindrance, 
in speaking English correctly. 

Recitation — "Old Bob's Life Insur- 
a— ^p," by Miss Helen Oellig. 

Literary Echo— by Editor, J. D. 
Reber. 

Music — "Spring Song," by Miss 
Kathryn Miller. 

On account of a public program ren- 
dered by the Homerian's on Friday- 
evening, October 11, the program of 
the Keystone Society consisted only of 
a business session and Parliamentar}^ 
drill. At this meeting the following of- 
ficers were elected for the coming- 
month : 

Pres. — Mr. Hiram Eberly. 

Vice Pres. — Mr. E. G. Long. 

Sec. — Miss Xaomi Longenccker. 

Critic— Prof. J. S. Harley. 

Custodian — Mr. A. L. Reber. 

Editor — Miss Lillian Becker. 

Homerian News. 
The Homerians held their first pub- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



lie meeting on Friday evening, Octo- 
ber II. The following program was 
well rendered : 

Roll Call — Secretary. 

Invocation — Chaplain. 

Reading — Nora L. Reber. 

Essay — "Who are Some of Ameri- 
ca's Great Educators?" Ruth Stayer. 

Piano Solo — Viola Withers. 



Paper — Silas Marner. Laban Leiter. 

Address — Speaker. 

Critic's Remarks — Prof. Ober. 

On October 25 the Society elected 
new officers and discussed a part of the 
revised constitution. At the next 
meeting the newly elected ofificers will 
be installed and the re^•ised constitu- 
tion adopted. A full attenda-:ce oi the 
members is requested. 



The Value of an Education 



Sara G. Replogle, '14. 



The educated person starts out in 
life with a priceless heritage. In the 
first place, education leads to prosper- 
ity. By this we mean that an educated 
person will be more prosperous in life 
than a person who is not educated. 
We must bear in mind that education 
does not consist in book knowledge 
alone. Webster defines education as 
being "a systematic development and 
cultivation of the mind and other 
natural powers, and the direction of the 
feelings, the tastes, and the manners, 
by inculcation, example, experience, " 
and impression." Some of our great 
men did not have so much book know- 
ledge, yet we may say they were ed- 
ucated. If a person has the right kind 
of an education, he can not help being 
more prosperous than the uneducated 
person. Take for instance, a man who 
intends to be a prosperous farmer. 
He must know how to till the soil to 
the best advantage, he must know 
when to plow the ground and how to 



care for the stock, so that it will be in 
good order. Education not onh' helps 
a man to be a prosperous farmer but it 
also helps a woman to be a good house- 
keeper. However, there are people in 
this world who seem to be too well ed- 
ucated to make a happy home. Educa- 
tion in this sense may not be a means 
of prosperity. 

Furthermore, it is not only in the 
home and on the farm that educated 
persons are needed but there are thous- 
ands of positions open today for the 
,, educated man or woman. Perhaps one 
of the most important of these posi- 
tions is the school room. A person 
who wants to teach school must have 
an education. There was a time w'hen 
a person could teach if he did not have 
much of an education, but that time is 
past. Now our schools call for well 
educated teachers, and standards are 
being raised year by year. 

Just as education leads to prosperity, 
so ignorance, which is the opposite of 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



education, leads to disadvantage. An 
ignorant person must necessarily be 
one who cannot read or write, and like- 
wise lacks knowledge along other lines. 
We can see how such a person could 
make life a success, but would meet 
with many an inconvenience in life. 
By seeing the misfortunes to which 
ignorance leads, one should appreciate 
more than ever the value of an educa- 
tion. 

Again, as a rule, education preserves 
us from evil habits. An educated man 
or woman should have the power of 
overcoming evil temptations as they 
come. With education should come 
good moral character, for we think an 
education is not complete without this 
element in it. When character is once 
formed, temptation should be easily 
overcome. Hence, in this way, charac- 
ter, as a result of true education, will 
preserve us from evil habits. 

In the next place, education provides 
■enjoyment. How much enjoyment 



could we get out of life if we were ig- 
norant persons? We can scarcely re- 
alize the enjoyment we get from read- 
ing good books. There are people who 
enjoy reading to such an extent that 
they will not think of anything else, 
while reading a good book. They will 
not even think of their meals while 
their minds are being supplied with 
food. Then, too, an ignorant person 
may not realize pleasure from travel- 
ing, but an educated person will enjoy 
visiting places of historical interest and 
other places as well. 

Education also helps to make good 
government, hence a strong nation. 
In fact, what would our nation be to- 
day if the people were all ignorant? 
Many laws would be needed, but who 
would be capable of making them? 
The men who are sent to Washington 
to help to make the laws that govern 
our nation, should be educated men. 
If they are not educated, they will not 
be able to do the work entrusted to 
them. 





Look there ! Ursinus has aboHshed, 
fraternities. 

The Susquehanna may be termed a 
well balanced paper. It does not over- 
emphasize any one phase of college 
activity. We believe the article on 
"The ^Meaning of Roosevelt" pictures 
him as he will be looked upon by the 
future historian. Furthermore, Dr. 
Floyds ably argues the four points in 
favor of the Christian College. Art- 
icles of this kind acquaint us with the 
teachers of an institution better than 
flattery or boasting. 

A few photographs of schools and of 
their surroundings give us a clearer 
conception of institutions. They are 
no more remembered as vague abstrac- 
tions. The Jubilee number of the M. 
H. Aerolith does it. 

The Carlisle Arrow would do well to 
group more distinctly articles of a 
similar nature under a heading suit- 
able for each. However, in other re- 
spects the paper is to be commended. 
Little room is given to trash and it 
surely gives a clear conception of the 



work that has been carried on at the 
Indian School. 

Targum, where are your editorials? 
Have you nothing more to tell us than 
the ordinary happenings of school life? 
We desire to know what your students 
are thinking, and how much they are 
thinking. Your advertisements oc- 
cupy more space than all the other 
things put together. 

An up-to-date paper, one that em- 
phasizes every phase of school activity 
to the proper extent, is the ^luhlenberg. 
Its general appearance, — excepting its 
small type — ,and its cuts are note- 
worthy. No less does it fail to come 
up to the standard in its literary pro- 
ductions. One is profited by readings 
"Franklin, The Philanthropist" and 
"Gambling With Souls." Further- 
more, it does not emphasize athletics 
as though that were the predominating 
function of the school. 

College papers are rather late in 
starting this year, yet we find on our 
table, in addition to those already 
mentioned, The Gettysburg Weekly 
and The Sunburian. 




Since the last issue of Our College 
Times very little has trans])ired in the 
Alumni Association. However, there 
are a few facts which we have observed 
and which no doubt will be of interest. 
Some sadden our hearts while others 
cause us to rejoice. 

Every Alumnus will be sadly grieved 
to hear of the death of Miss Edith Mar- 
tin. '08. J\liss Martin was a student at 
this place for part of two years and 
finished the English Scientific Course 
in 1908. being historian of the class. 
She will be remembered by all her 
classmates as a jolly and sunshiny girl. 

Her late home was at Derry Church. 
We are unable to publish particulars 
regarding her death. Surely this is a 
shock to all her friends. It seems sad 
that one so young should have been 
called away. Miss Martin is the first 
to break the circle of Alumni, but we 
must remember that 

"There is no fireside howsoe'er 
■defended. 

But has one vacant chair." 

The Alumni Association tenders its 
deepest sympathies to the bereaved 
family, knowing that what the Master 
does is well done. 



Among those who visited the College 
recently are Elma Brandt, '11, William 
F. Christman, '11, and Florence Miller, 
'10. Miss Miller has already engaged a 
room for the Spring Term. If any 
more of the Alumni desire rooms for 
the Spring Term they had better apply 
early as the rooms will be well filled by 
that time. 

Latest reports say that Abel W. 
Madeira, '09, who was teaching in Iowa 
has left his position there and has ac- 
cepted a better paying position in a 
Business school in Connecticut where 
he will teach Penmanship. We are 
now represented in Asia, Europe and 
America and we hope the day may not 
be far distant when Africa and South 
America shall also feel our influence. 

Mr. B. F. Waltz, '10 spent October 
12 and 13 visiting friends in Green- 
castle, Frantlin County. If any one 
is desirous of learning how to get more 
than one birth-day supper in a year en- 
quire at once of Mr. Waltz. Of course 
an increase in birthdays brings with it 
as a consequence an increase in years. 
Undoubtedly this accounts for his hav- 
ing reached the age of twenty and 
nine (?) so rapidly. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



Misses Kathryn Moyer, 'lo, and 
Floy Crouthamel, 'lo, are spending 
this school year in their own homes. 
They were offered schools but out of 
love for those who need their services 
at home they have refused the positions 
offered. Surely this is a noble step and 
one that should be emulated. The 
spirit of sacrifice is the spirit of service. 
The post of duty is ever the place of 
blessinsf. 



Rumor has it that Mr. L. W. Leiter, 
'09, spent Saturday and Sunday, Oct- 
ober 5 and 6 in York County. Question : 
"Did his or some one else's heart get 
lighter?" 

Isaac Z. Hackman, '07, a graduate in 
the Business Course, after several 
years of teaching in Philadelphia, has 
returned to Elizabethtown where he is 
head bookkeeper at the Buch establish- 
ment. He is filling the position vaca- 
ted by I. E. Shoop, '04. 



Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. None 
Better, Fe-w as Good. 

D. H. BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTOV/^N 



Thi baker who knows how. Phone or drop a postal 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPUES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



CENTRAL 



MEAT 



MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



H. H. GOOD 



EMZABETHTOWX 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 



Plain Suits, Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats. 

GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Oranga St;., Lancaster, Pa. 



Elizabethtown Dental 

Parlors 

» 

Office Closed Thursday 
and Friday 

S. J. HEINDEL. DENTIST 



R. H. SHISSLER. 



Chas. B . Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



26 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



jiBiiiiiiiiiiniiii:ii''.iBi!iiniiiifl!iiniiiini!iini!iiniiii:n!!n'.'iiiiiin 

^ College Jewelry of the Better Sort = 

i G. WmJREISNER I 

1 Manufacturing | 



Jcivelcr 

Class Pins and Rings 



= Fraternity Je-welry 
D 

m 120 East Chestnut Street. 



Prize Caps H 
Medals M 






LANCASTER, PA. | 

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P and 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 






F. T. MiJth 



H. M. Muth 



MUTH BROS 



Dealers in 



ILUMBE 



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Also all kinds of building material f 



and mill work, Slate and Cement, 
Wheeler Screens, Fertilizer, Patent 
Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board, etc. 

COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. 

We also aim to give you a square 
deal that will merit your trade and 
friendship. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 






DENTIST 

GEO. rt. KERSEY 

Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



i WE DO IT RIGHT. 



Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES CBi SON 



F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 

Horseshoaing a Specialty. 

N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 



J. CROFF & SOJ^S 

eat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



This Pen 



Iluckv] 

IcUR/E 



Yes. in any posi- f^^^J 



• you want to. 
, , any pocket. 
b "s: carry the Parker Jack Knife 
VI T your trousers pocket along 

\ r keys. 
L h carry it in the pocket of 

' . '- blouse. 

'. ; y ' '--all with it,— basketball, 

i:a-, h> ri'^y. It's on the job the 

:ri ■'■ :"u "ant to write, without 

.vi:.y. c r'::' 'ad spot of ink any- 

his bi:;- 1 carried. 

> Jii;t Imagine a pen of 

~'sGi:hot rticlt.^ ;t nk as you slide it 

d .'osipaptr! T'lK, - the way it writes. 

'^r>';e $2 5C up. ."let one on trial. 

"i.ks it back a. y ■ -e within 10 

cl.iys if ycu'ie •■ i t 'ed to death 

will it. _\Vc aiu' or::.; Ualer to re- 

fiip.d. if y or ci r u "sn'l carry 

Parkers, write u:- fcr cat.,'-'? today. 

PARK?:?. P::N CGyANV 
Mill ^:t., .Inner,-/: l^, Wis. 



) £V 
V.Sr 

V 



■^^ 





For sale at the Bookroom. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 27 



1900 1912 

IT PA YS TO ED UCA TE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 

SEVEN REASONS : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location, 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Et|uipment. 

For further particulars, address 

Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN PA. 



28 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Elizabettitown Exchange 

Bank 



Transacts « jroneral bunking Imsiness, pays iii- 
t<>r«'st on time deposits, solicits your piiti-onnue 



OFFICERS 



A. G. HEISEY, Pres. 



ALLEN A. COBLE. \'ice I'ips 



J, H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier 



DIRECTORS 



A. G. Heisey Jos. G. Heisey B. H. Greider, H. J. Gish 

Allen A. Coble Dr. H. K. Bloiigh Henry E. Landis J. H. Bucb 

Di. A, M. Kalbach Geo. D. BoggE E. E. Hernly 



>tA-**#*#*4fe** ***-*##4>*#*****#4^#*-* 



P. N. Kraybill I I Warner's 



Rheems 



a Groceries, 

*>' Boots, 

<? 



Both 'Phones 



Penn'a 



Dealer in 



■h 

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Dry Goods, Notions, '^ 
Shoes and Rubbers >y 

» 



liiiiaiiiiiE 



ilQliiiS!! 



Hardware, Paints, Oils, Turpen- 
tine and Glass 



Oilcloth, Linoleums, Matting, Win- 
dow Shades and Strips 



Soliciting a Share of Your Business * 



Corsets 



m 



are the only corsets that are en- 
dorsed so fully and strongly to us. 

Guaranteed to shape fashion- 
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to rust, break or tear. 

You connot say any more in 
favor of a corset excepting to give 
its price — 

$1.00 to $2.00 Per Pair 

If w^e could say just the things 
that we say about Warner's Rust- 
Proof Corsets, it w^ould make 
any corset worth while ; but 
WARNER'S are the only corsets 
we can make this absolute state- 
ment regarding. 

Huntzberger-Winters Co. 

ELIZABETHTOW^N, PA. 



IHlll 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



THE ''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundrj'. 
Shipped every Wednesday 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PEXNA. 



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FTATIONERY, SCHOOL SUPPLIES 
POST CARDS 

We furnish everything in 

SPORT!!VG GOODS aid ATHi_ETIC | 
SUPPLIES 

H. K. Oorsheimer 

Bell 'Phone 38-3 
On the Square, Elizabethtown Pa. 



John A. Fisher 



BARBER 



•Centre Square, 



Elizabethto\»rii, Pa. 



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CHOICE GROCERIES 

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West High Street, ILiizabethtown, Pa. 



GEO. A. FISHER 



Automobiles > 

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Records 
F. P. GAS PLANTS 

ELIZABETH TOWN, - I'ENNA. 



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♦ hay and straw 



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Manufacturer of Best Grades nl 

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30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 



The Bee Hive Store 



South Market and Bainbridge Streets, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Dry Goods,Notions, Shoes, Carpets, Draperies and an Up-to-Date 
Gent's and Ladies' Furnishings 

''SOMETHING NEW EVERY DAY" 



line of 




The Duplex 

Recommends Literary 
and Commercial teachers 
Secretaries and Account- 
ants. Schools for sale. 
Circurlars free. Write 
for further information. 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Lunches 



Telephones 



D. W. MIESSE 

Baker and Confectioner 

123 N. Queen St. 

LANCASTER, PA. 



Ice Cream 



Water Ice 



* 




D. C. BRINSER 



Grain, Flour, Feed, 
Seeds, Hay, Straw 
and Fertilizer. 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 



A farmer once to a certain age ^ 

;Tn the Lunch Room Business did en- ^ 
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T'was Nissley. 
Thousands of people now are fed. 
Pure, delicious, quick. Enough said. 

TRY NISSLEY 
14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. ^ 



* 
* 

* 

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Ursinus College % 

COLLEGEVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 

(24 miles from Philadelphia.) 



Organized and administered under the Group Sys- 
tem of Ins-truction, providing both liberal culture and 
special preparation for the vnnous vocations, an 
arrangement presenting exceptional advantages for 
efficiency and economy All groups open to women 
as well as men Write for special bulletin and 
descriptive pamphlet. 

A. Edwin Keigwin D.D., President. 
Geo. Leslie Omwake, Pd.D., Vice-Pres. 



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I Spalding Sporting Goods I 



^ Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, ^ 

r Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic ♦ 

♦ Shoes. Kodaks .and Cameras, de- ♦ 

4 veloping and finishing. X 



♦ 
♦ 

♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4 



H. B. H E R R 
30-32 West King Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 



►♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦ 



IF ITS MUSIC OR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, WE HAVE IT! 



IIS 



IkirR Johnson & Co. 



MUSIC HALL 
16-18 West King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 

iliiliilllllHIIIIiliiillliiiiHNllHIIHHliilHiliiiHIIiniiiiniiilHI'illBIHIOiniliiili^^^^^^ 



Mention Our GDllege Times When Writing. 



31 






ail Orders Solicited for 
Books 



an 



mies 



S l\/loil 0»«rl^»«c ^olir^i+#ari -Fi^h t 

•> 



B 



FALKES^STEir^, Elizabethtown, Pa 



Ipaintiiig anb IPaper ^ 
Ibanging 

A^IQS B. PRACE 

ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone i 

CONN «?. SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 
Catalogues a Specialty ' 

211 V.'. G ant St., LA^JCAETER, FA. 



S. G. GRAYBILL 



=^ 




K 



ar 



^ 



College Hill Daii^y 

Fresh milk and creaai daily. Ail milk 
tested forchildren; free from tubercidosis 

HOTELS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED 



J 



i< 



IS the cry of man and horse. The 
horse says "It pulls so eas:?" and the 
Iran says "It rides so nice and lasts 
£0 long." So come my neighbor, get 
yourself such an outfit and be pleased 
yet more than that. 

REBER WAGON WORKS 
Centreport, Pa. 



AKE YOURo 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday aiormng. 
Keturns VVednesday and Friday afternoon. 

CALL, AT 
RALPH GROSS SHAVI?>iG PARLOR 
Conducted on sanitary principles. 

Massaiing a Specialty. 
Agency of First-Cl.iss Laundry. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - TENXA. 



I O. TV. HEISEY I 

:^ Provisions, Groceries, CBi, Choice Candies ^ 



:^ HEISEY BUILDING 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. ^ 



'9(f^^f>(f^(fMfy(f^(f^^fMf^(fMf^(fMf^(fMfMf^1\(f^(f^(f^(fyf^(f^ff^(^ 



32 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-Made Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 



North East Corner Centre Square, 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



JACOts FISHER 
Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, Ellzabethtown, Penna. 

With you for 81 years. That's All 



FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
will convince. Work c:uaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Ellzabethtown. Pa. 



E H. LEHM 
COAL 



WOOD, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR. \ 
Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Bell and Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 

46 E. King St., Lancaster, Pa. 

CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Young 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Ind. Phone 



Hours 8 to 6 



DR. JEROME G. HESS 
DENTIST 



Hertzler Bldg. 
Ellzabethtown Pa. 




Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 

Choice Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and. 

Co£Pees, Fresh Country Butter and Eggs 

Bell Phone Ellzabethtown, Penna 



We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 



W. R. Ashenfelter 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied with 
Fancy Cakes at short notice. 



S. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Y. M. C. A. Bldg., 



Lancaster, Pa. 



» 



I H. H. BRAND! 



1 



» 



if^^^^^^^9^^fV^9^^^^y ir^?'^^^'?^^'^^ 



Dealer in 

ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



♦ Ellzabethtown, 



Penna. ^ 



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"It's not what we say we do; 
It's what we do." 

How often have you read the promises of men? 

How often have you paid the penalty afterwards? 

We often question the advisability of telling about 
the clothes we sell, for talk is cheap. However, there is 
only one way to interest the man who doesn't know us 
and that is to advertise. So, we are forced to use this 
method of getting in touch with you. 

This advertisement is not going to say a single word 
about our clothes. Its only object is to invite you to 
visit our shop. When you arrive here we'll show you. 

Can we hope to see you soon? 

"FOLLOW THE ARROW" TO 

S. M. MYERS & CO. 

CLOTHIERS — FURNISHERS — HATTERS 
12 East King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Hertzler's Department Store 




Your needs supplied at satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, Groceries, Ready-to-Wear Clothing for Men 
and Women of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Floor OilclotH 
Shoes, Etc. 

Polite attention. S'quare dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Aients for Made-to-Measure 



CLOTHING 



International Tailoring Co., New York. 
American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chicago. 
Up-to-Date Samples on Hand. 



Black Cat 
Hosiery 



HERTZLER BROS. 6l CO. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



W. S. SMITH, President. > PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier 



U. S. DEPOSITORY 



Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital Surplus and Profits $157,000.00 



General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid on special 
deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 





DIRECTORS 




^. S. Smith 


Elmer W. Strickler 


Peter N. Rutt 


F. W. Groff 


J. S. Risser 


B. U Geyer 


E.. C. Ginder 


Amos G. Coble 


E. E. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



Carl Schlotzhauer 



I 



The Students Official 
Photographer 






^^*^A^»V»N^y N »^A/^ 



■ 



a 



Don't have your Pho- 
tos taken anywhere else 
or you will regret it. 

You are invited to vis- 
it our studio and notice 
the 1912 Photography, 
something new and differ- 
ent than you have ever 
seen before. 







i 



We Are Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made to Order 

Plain 
Clothing 

In Tills Country 

When in Lancaster it will pay 
you to visit ours, the only 
Clothing Store in that city that 
has One Price to All and gives 
discounts to none. See us for 

MEN'S READY MADE AND 
MADE TO ORDER 

Clothing 

AND 

Furnishing 

YOUTH'S AND BOYS' 
CLOTHING 



SPECIAL RATE TO STUDENTS 

163 N. Queen St. 

OPPOSITE HOTEL WHEATLAND 



}$m^kmmtm90^fmtmt^/mimmL 




Hirsh & Bro. 

Since 1854 at 

Centre Square, Next to City Hall 

LANCASTER, .PA. 





Q^T£/v^ 




OUT OF DARKNESS INTO LIGHT 1 5 

POWER OF LOVE 6 

DRIFTING BUDDHA 8 

THE GREAT MOUNTAINS OF OUR NATION... 10 

EDITORIALS 13-16 

VENI, VIDI, OBII 15 

SCHOOL NOTES 17-22 

KEYSTONE L. S 21 

HOMERIAN L. S 22 

ALUMNI NOTES 22 

EXCHANGES 24 



(§nv (Slolk^t Stm^B 



Vol. X Elizabkthtown, Pa., Dkcember, 1912 No. 3 



Out of Darkness Into Light. 



From the heart of yonder mountain with a roar reverberating, 

From the gaping tunnel leaped the shrieking, thundering railway train, 
And its freedom seemed to fill it with a thrill exhilarating 

As it rushed into the radiance of the open sunlit plain. 
Then above the rugged entrance to that subterranean grotto 

In a bold, Inroad, sweeping curve high o'er the portal of the night, 
And in letters rude but graphic carved I this enduring motto, 

Never, was a grander watchword, "Out of darkness into light." 

When at dawn the approaching sun awakes the world to new endeavor, 

And the bugler in the mountains sounds the mellow hunting horn, 
Joy shall follow weeping vigil, gleam dispel the gloom forever. 

Glad we turn our faces eastward buoyantly to greet the morn. 
Then methinks I see an angel shrouded in celestial aura 

Vault the parapet of heaven and descend through ether bright 
And in characters of gold that fringe the arch of the aurora 

There inscribe the glorious watchword, "Out of darkness into light." 

When the human race emerging from the mediaeval ages 

Sees the horizon widen out and zenith over zenith rise, 
Nearer draws the bright millennium long foretold by bearded sages- 

Fellow traveler, lo ! the vision lures us on to Paradise. 
Onward and forever onward, hope mounts at each revelation, 

Splendor infinite unfolds before us in our heavenward flight, 
And o'erspanning each new vista we in rapt imagination 

Blazoned see the eternal watchword, "Out of darkness into light." 

— Nescls. 



The Power of Love. 



Ada Douty 



M^ny may ask, "What is Love?" 
and we receive as many different an- 
swers as there are people. One may 
say, "Love is liberty." Another says, 
"Love is such a giant power that it 
seems to gather strength from obstruc- 
tions, and at every difficulty rises to 
higher might." It is all-dominant— all- 
conquering; a grand leveler which can 
bring down to its own universal line 
of equalization the proudest heights 
and remove the most stubborn im- 
pediments. "Like death, it levels all 
ranks, and lays the shepherd's crook 
beside the sceptre." "Love is the light, 
the majesty of life, that principle to 
which, after all our struggling, and 
writhing, and twisting, all things must 
be resolved. Take it away, and what 
becomes of the world ! It is a barren 
wilderness ! A world of monuments, 
each standing upright and crumbling; 
an army of grey stones, without a 
chaplet, without a leaf to take ofif. 
Things base and foul, creeping and 
obscure, withered, bloodless, and brain- 
less, could alone spring from such a 
marble-hearted soil." The Bible says, 
"Love is the fulfilling of the law." 

That there may be love in societ}' 
there must be love in the home. In 
the true wife the husband finds not af- 
fection only, but companionship — a 
companionship with which no other 
can compare. 

There is a picture bright and beauti- 
ful, but nevertheless true, where hearts 



are united for mutual happiness and 
mutual improvement ; where a kind 
voice cheers th.e wife in her hour of 
trouble, and where the shade of anxiety 
is chased from the husband's brow as 
he enters the home ; where sickness is 
soothed by watchful love, and hope and 
faith burn brightly. For such there 
is great reward, both here and here- 
after, in their own and their families' 
spiritual happiness and growth, and in 
the blessed scenes of the world of 
spirits. The one is often willing to 
sacrifice in order to make 'the other 
happy. They attend the same church, 
and establish a family altar in the 
home. It is a blessing to be in a home 
where there is "sweet accord." The 
power of love is strong here. Though 
they live for themselves they live for 
others also. They are not selfish with 
their love. 

As the days, weeks, and months 
go by, they still have their love 
centered on each other; but now a 
change takes place. A dear little 
angel baby is found in the home. They 
now give much time, labor, and love to 
the child. They smile over the cradle ; 
they sing for it, pray for it, and fondle 
it as best they can. It drives away 
sorrow and brings sunshine into the 
home. By and by another babe finds 
its place in the home. Here the child- 
ren grow up together. They now im- 
part love to their parents in their child- 
ish way, and tell all their sorrows, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



disappointments, and troubles to papa 
and mamma. If mothers tell their sor- 
rows and troubles to their children they 
will, in turn, tell them to their parents.. 
Children will know their parents and 
love them ; and when the period of life 
comes that they must turn from the 
dear and familiar scenes of childhood, 
and seek new friends and surroundings, 
though they have longed for it, yet, 
when the moment comes, what bitter 
tears are shed, and how the heart aches. 

Children should cherish in their 
hearts all the pure and holy associa- 
tions of their early years. They will be 
as a shield to protect them from the 
temptations which are ever ready to 
destroy the unwary and thoughtless. 
Since husbands and wives love each 
other they love their children, and the 
children, in return, love their parents, 
and naturally, love each other. This 
is what makes a home completely 
happy. Home is the spot where the 
child pours out all its complaints, and 
it is a grave of all sorrows. Home has 
an influence which is stronger than 
death. It is a law to our hearts, and 
binds us with a spell which neither 
time nor change can break. There is 
nothing on earth so beautiful as the 
household on which Christian love for- 
ever smiles. Therefore the power of 
love in a home is great since love binds 
the inmates so closely together with 
cords of affection that they are never 
broken. 

If there is love in the home there will 
be love in a community. To illustrate 
the power of love which a man had for 
his neighbor I will relate an incident. 
There were two men, living side by 
side, whose names were Long and 
Brown. Mr. Long was a Christian 



but Mr. Brown was not. One day 
Neighbor lirown's cows broke into a 
field of corn belonging to Neighbor 
Long. Mr. Long drove them out and 
took them home. A few days after- 
ward the same thing happened and Mr. 
Long chased them home again. But 
one day Neighbor Long's cows got into 
Neighbor Brown's corn-field. Mr. 
Brown took them out, hissed the dogs 
after them, and treated them shame- 
fully. This made Mr. Brown very 
angry and he decided to have Mr. Long 
arrested. Rather than appear before 
court Mr. Long said he would pay the 
damages. Mr. Brown refused to settle. 
He said that the damages amounted to 
twenty-five dollars. After speaking 
to the lawyer it was decided that each 
man should appoint a man to estimate 
the value of the property destroyed. 
So neighbor Long appointed Mr. 
Brown and Mr. Brown appointed Mr. 
Long. They met on the day appointed 
and neighbor Brown said that Mr. 
Long should make his estimate, but he 
refused and said that neighbor Brown 
should state the amount. Mr. Brown 
said that he did not think it was more 
than five dollars, which Mr. Long paid 
gladly. After that time they were al- 
ways friends and not long" afterwards 
Mr. Long persuaded Mr. Brown to be- 
come a Christian. One of the greatest 
commandments in the Bible is, "Thou 
shalt love thy neighbor as thyself," and 
Mr. Long and Mr. Brown kept it ever 
after they were both Christians. 

Love cannot be separated by natural 
obstacles. Valleys may be separated 
by mountains yet love will exist. 
Rivers, mountains, valleys, plains, can- 
yons, oceans, and seas can separate 
people that love each other but it can- 



8 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



not separate the love that they have 
for each other. When people have 
love for each, other, it enlarges in ever- 
widening circles until it has reached 
the uttermost parts of the earth. 

Society, in general, is linked together 
by the chain of love. This love origi- 
nated in God himself, for John the 



Revelator says, "We love God, because 
he first loved us." Implicit love in the 
home, Christian love and fellowship in 
the Church, and love for all mankind, 
are types of the real fruition of love 
which shall be the atmosphere of the 
soul in the world to come. 



Drifting Buddha. 



B. F. Waltz. 



It is said that as a final test for his 
godship, Buddha was commanded to 
embark on the river Ganges in a boat 
without oars, and that his immortality 
would be assured if he floated against 
the current. As soon as he reached 
the middle of the stream, some un- 
known, superhuman force carried him 
up the river. He was assured of his 
Buddhaship. Fate caused him to be- 
come a god, or master of the elements, 
and from that day to this present time 
he is worshiped by thousands in hea- 
thendom. 

Did you notice that Buddha went up 
stream without any effort of his own? 
We are in the stream of life. We are 
no Buddhas. We can go up stream as 
did Buddha, but we must add thrift 
and determination. He, indeed, did 
float against the current, but we will 
float with the current unless special 
effort is put forth. We have learned 
that it does not take any labor to float 
with the current ; and as a result, as 
one of a crowd goes, so the others 
follow. The flotsam and jetsam of to- 



day is one of the greatest drawbacks 
to the advancement of society. 

The first thing necessary for young 
people entering this stream of life is a 
high aim. Did I say high? Have you 
noticed how the skilled boatman makes 
an allowance for the strength of the 
current when he wishes to cross a 
stream? He always aims far above 
the place where he wishes to land. 
Especially is this the case when the 
current is strong. Indeed the current 
into which you and I are launched is 
very strong. Remember, therefore, 
that we must keep our aim high. The 
blighting acts of people whom we must 
be about, have an influence upon us. 
There are many "Gyp the Bloods" and 
"Lefty Louies" about us. They all 
have a tendency to pull us from our 
aim. Rosenthal, although a gambler, 
felt it his duty to expose some of the 
evils of the police force in New York 
City. His aim was high, but the evil in- 
fluences of the "Bloody Four" caused 
his death. Our aim must be very high 
in order to have it act as an offset for 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



some of the destructive influences 
about us. 

Buddha, deprived of oars, indeed 
went against the current. Although 
we are no gods yet we in one respect 
surpass Buddha. Fate was his de- 
terming force, \^'e are the masters 
of our own destiny. We are provided 
with talents, education, effort, and "I 
will," as our oars. We must be very 
careful that we keep aiming aright, for 
these oars will help just as much going 
down stream. Our talented, educated 
rascals are the worst scoundrels with 
whom we have to deal. 

The little fellow had the proper spirit 
in Sunday School, even if not the prop- 
er reading, when he said that Daniel 
was "of a great spine." The men with 
big spines are the persons that are now 
accomplishing things. Too long have 
we as an American people catered to 
the follies of our sensuous natures. 
Let us not drift, but let us stand for 
what we believe to be right. We see 
a lack of spine in the man who simply 
votes as his neighbor for fear of being 
criticized. The man who can not say 
no when five dollars is offered him for 
his vote is drifting with the tide. We 
see a dangerous element in a man when 
he does not vote for principle but 
simply for party. We must put our- 
selves in a position to pull on the oars 
and go up stream. The place of neu- 
trality is a dangerous one in some of 
these vital questions. The alert mari- 
ner fears the doldrums, the region of 
dead calms near the equator, more so 
than the icefloes of the north or the 
monsoon's blast. In the strength of 
our manhood we must meet the cur- 
rent. 

Many things come as temptations 



while young people are getting their 
education. There is a tendency for us 
to take the short courses in order to be 
able to get out and earn some money. 
Those in longer courses are tempted 
to stop and secure employment. Some 
young men flit from one occupation to 
another. They are subject entirely to 
the current. Obstacles overcome them 
instead of their overcoming obstacles. 
If we strike something difficult let us 
hit it hard. In the great school of life 
we are constantly making trial of our 
godship. We are masters of ourselves 
only as we overcome the current of 
obstacles. 

It is said that we as an American 
people follow too much the line of least 
resistance. Thus it was with the hero 
in Romola. How different it was with 
the heroine! She followed duty even 
if it did mean death to her. The man 
who does his duty will not seek the 
line of least resistance. Let us do 
things because they are difficult. We 
can overcome the force of the current 
only as we pull hard with the oars. 

It is easy for us to do just as others 
do when out in society, even if it is 
contrary to the wishes of the folks at 
home. We drift with the current. We 
are afraid to be a little different from 
those who are drifting. We lack moral 
courage to do what we believe to be 
right. If we are Christians, let us be 
Christians with all our might. We 
must move not only against the current 
of vice, but rise above it. 

A number of our church fathers have 
taught us again and again the lesson 
of holding fast to our profession. Let 
us not be moved by every wind of doc- 
trine. Let us not drift as do others ; but 
unfurling our banner of good will to all 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



men, let us spread our sails so that the 
breezes of heaven will waft us through 
the troubled waters to the haven of 
rest. 

We can go against the current today 
only as we find our ideal in the Man of 



Galilee. We will be conquerors only 
as we have Jesus in us. We will be 
masters of ourselves only as we over- 
come the temptations of the sirens and 
the lure of evil. 



The Great Mountains of Our Nation. 



I. J. Kreider. 



On the eastern coast of our country 
lie the great Appalachians which form- 
ed the barrier that held our thirteen 
original colonies in one compact body, 
but at length they were crossed and be- 
yond them were found the most fertile 
fields of our nation. Crossing these we 
come to a range containing the highest 
peaks with their beautiful grand canon 
and most magnificent amphitheatres, 
with cliffs and rocks of the most 
curious and fantastical shapes. Moving 
on to the Pacific Coast we find the 
Sierra Nevada and the Coast Range, 
in which you may see the sublime glory 
of the sun setting far away on the 
coast, when the pine tree is shining in 
the departing sunlight for a short 
time, and the warm dusky glimmer 
gradually fades away on the horizon. 

Men have crossed these mountains ; 
men have dug into their hearts, in 
which they found the wealth of the 
nation. But between these mountains 
lie other mountains whose summits 
have not yet been reached, and whose 
hearts men have not yet pierced. 

These are not physical mountains 



but hyperphysical. These are not 
mountains of earth and stone but 
mountains of evil. Almost two thous- 
and years ago the Ephesians brought 
seven thousand five hundred dollars 
worth of'bad books from their city and 
kindled a bonfire in some public place. 
Should not the cities of our country 
make a bonfire of bad books and news- 
papers? We have enough fuel to start 
a blaze thousands of feet in height. 
One of the greatest scourges that has 
ever come upon this nation is bad 
literature. It has its victims in all 
employments and departments. It 
has helped to fill the insane asylums, 
penitentiaries, almshouses, and dens of 
shame. The London plague was noth- 
ing compared with it. That counted 
its victims by the thousands, but this 
modern pest has already shovelled its 
millions into graves. 

Again there is a great mountain 
sitting between the Rocky mountains 
and the Sierra Nevada. It sits in de- 
fiance and mockery, some-times hold- 
ing its sides with uncontrollable mirth 
at our national impotency. It has 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



U 



demoralized the whole nation. Never- 
the less only four-score years ago 
it originated in the state of New York. 
In 1853 the corner stone of the beauti- 
ful temple in Salt Lake City was laid. 
Today the Mormons are busy in Nor- 
way, in Sweden, in England, in Ireland, 
in Scotland, and in Germany, breaking 
up homes and with infernal cords 
drawing the population this way — a 
population which is dumped as carrion 
on the American territories. Our 
nations' crime with its long rake 
stretched across other continents is 
heaping up on this land long windrows 
of abomination and is growing worse 
and worse. 

There is still another mountain of 
evil which does not belong to the East, 
nor to the West, nor to the North, nor 
to the South. Yet there is not an 
American river into which its tears 
have not fallen. What ruined that 
southern plantation where every field 
is a fortune? What threw that New 
England farm into decay and turned 
the rosy cheeks that bloomed at the 
foot of the Green Mountains into the 
pallor of despair What has smitten 
every street of every village, town, and 
city of this continent with a moral 
pestilence? It is so great an evil that 
some states have prohibited it by con- 
stitutional amendments. Others have 
made the sale of it a crime. Wbrd 
comes to us from all sources saying 
that there is going to be a great con- 
flict in which either intemperance or 
the American government will be de- 
stroyed. Intemperance and free in- 
stitutions cannot walk side by side. 
These are but a few of the many 
mountains in our free America. 

Thus we see that we have great 



mountains to overcome, we have great 
battles to fight, and we see the need of 
men who dare to stand firm for truth, 
for honesty, for right, for anything that 
develops noble character. The wisest 
king that ever lived said, "Wisdom is 
the principal thing, therefore get 
wisdom." Solomon referred not to 
the wisdom of the head but rather to 
the wisdom of the heart. 

But we are living in a day and age 
when people have little or no time to 
think on wisdom but often on that 
which tends to lead them into degrada- 
tion and debauchery. We need a 
thinking people, for a thinking people 
must soon become a great people. 
Thinking men are men of influence. 
Men of influence are men of character. 
Men of character are men of power. It 
requires time to think ; it requires time 
to become men of noble character, or to 
become men of power. It pays. Chan- 
ning wisely said, "My road must be 
through character to power; I will try 
no other; and I am sanguine enough 
to believe that this course, though not 
the quickest, is the surest." 

During a riot in Paris in 1848, a mob 
swept down the street killing the sol- 
diers, spiking the guns, leaving death 
and destruction in its trail. Suddenly 
the mob was halted by a white-haired 
man who signaled for silence. The 
leader of the mob recognized the se- 
rene face of the old man and cried : 
"Citizens, it is De I'Eure. Sixty years 
of purity of life are about to address 
you." Almost as if by magic the heed- 
less mob that could not be quelled by 
soldiers and guns, stopped, looked, and 
listened. The purity of purpose and 
integrity of character in one good man, 
were mightier than the armies of a na- 



12 OUR COLLEGE TIMES 

tion. Let us therefore get all the go to battle with the confidence that 
scholarship we can, let us get all the great mountains will be removed and 
wisdom we can, let us get all the cul- that the victory will surely be ours, for 
ture we can. But above all let us strive we shall not fight our battles alone, 
to build noble characters. Let us re- "For behind the dim unknown stand- 
member that goodness is better than eth God, within the shadows, keeping 
greatness. With this as our aim let us watch over his own." 



.-@^i^^ 



A "Down East" Thanksgiving. 

A fireplace that reeked of the pines of old Maine : 

Backlog and forestick, andirons and crane; 

Odorous, resinous, pungent and rare, 

It seemed as if incense were blent with the air. 

Standing apart, grim sentinels, as 'twere, , 

The great, roomy settle, the hooded arm chair; 

While ranged on the mantle-piece, ponderous and wide, 

The pewter and delft — our grandmother's pride. 

Safe beyond reach of the mischievous elves, 

Great, luscious pies, ranged in line on the shelves ; 

Jellies that quivered with joy in each mold, 

Sweetmeats that vied with the nectars of old. 

Puddings with plums as big as your thumb, 

And turkeys whose weight would 'most strike you dumb. 

Game pies so huge and lusciously browned 

That Arthur, his knights of the table round 

And all the fair ladies might sup, nor want more. 

Though numbering, in truth a goodly fourscore. 

Crannies and corners and cupboards untold, 

Room and a welcome for young and for old ; 

Comfort from cellar to attic for all — 

Up chamber, down chamber, parlor and hall ; 

When all the kin folks — from no matter where — 

Gathered at "Grand'ther's" Thanksgiving to share. 

— Mrs. Margaret N. Goodnow. 




EDITORIAL BOARD. 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, '11, Editor-in-Chief 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 



Orville Z. Becker, '15 School Notes 

Nora L. Reber, '11 Homerian News 

Mary Scheaffer, '13: K. L. S. News 

Leah Sheaffer, '09 Alumni Notes 



C. L. Martin, '13 Exchanges 

J. D. Reber, '14 Bus. Mgr. 

A. L. Reber, '13 Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Daisy P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year by Elizabethtown College. 

Arrearage on subscription to this paper is charged. 

Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates: — Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy; five years for $2.00. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postotfice. 



By the time this issue of the paper 
reaches our readers Thanksgiving Day 
will be in the past but we hope all may 
have pleasant memories of the day. 
This past year truly has been rich for 
us in temporal and spiritual blessings ; 
have we acknowledged th^se blessings 
with thankful hearts? Our life each 
day should breathe a prayer unto God 
for his goodness unto us. 

Following this National Day of 
Thanksgiving comes a day more sig- 
nificant. It is the most cherished da>v 
of all the year because love gave it to 



us. Christmas, Merry Christmas, the 
day of true thanksgiving, will soon be 
here. There is nothing for which we 
should be more thankful than for the 
life of our Master and the plan of sal- 
vation. By the atonement Jesus has 
wiped away the Adamic sin, thus 
effecting a reconciliation between God 
and man, and has provided a cleans- 
ing for our personal sins. May we 
all apply this cleansing power to our 
sinful hearts so that we may have a 
right to the tree of life, and truly be 
able to say, "A Merry Christmas in 
Christ Jesus." 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The cut for the exchange department 
of this paper was designed by Mr. 
Albert L. Reber. Somehow the manu- 
facturers of the cut omitted his initials 
in reproducing the drawing. We, 
therefore, take this means of informing 
our readers of the name of the designer. 



The Librarian of the College desires 
to have a complete file of Our College 
Times for the College Library. At 
present the file is complete with the ex- 
ception of two numbers ; viz., Novem- 
ber, 1904 and July, 1910. If anyone 
has one or both of these copies, we will 
be pleased to hear from you and, if 
possible, make an arrangement for the 
purchase or the donation of the same. 
Will you please assist us by looking 
over your copies for the above issues? 



Bible Term Announcement 

The annual Bible Term held at Eliz- 
abethtown College will open January 
15, and close January 24. We hope a 
large number of our brethren and sis- 
ters will arrange to be with us this 
year. Further information can be 
secured by sending a card to Dr, D. C. 
Reber. Elizabethtown, Pa. 

The program promises a rich treat 
for all wdio will attend. The work of 
these ten days is varied and can not 
fail to give all some valuable helps 
'and hints. Young ministers, espec- 
ially, should make it a point to hear 
Bro. J. G. Royer give his "Lessons in 
Homiletics." Bro. J. Kurtz Miller will 
again give us some of his splendid 
■expositions of scripture. He has se- 
lected First and Second Peter for his 
"work this year. Bro. Hertzler, who 
^ave such an instructive analysis of 
Romans last year, will this year use 



First Corinthians for his lessons. 
Then, too, Bro. Jesse Ziegler will con- 
tinue his practical talks on the subject 
of Prayer. Besides this, members of 
the College Faculty will give instruc- 
tion in Psalms, Sunday School Work, 
and Music. Bro. vStover will also give 
talks on Missions several days. 

Now brethren and sisters, here is an 
opportunity for us all to improve and 
develop for better service for the 
Master. The work of the church lies 
before us, and her greatest need is 
trained workers. We heartily invite 
all who feel the need of more prepara- 
tion for their life's work, to be present 
and assist in making this the best Bible 
Term held on College Hill. 

Daily Program 

a. m. 
8 — 9 — Library Work or Study. 
9:00 — Chapel Exercises. 
9:20 — Lessons in Homiletics — J. G. 

Royer. 
10:00 — I Corinthians.. S. H. Hertzler. 

10:40 — I Peter J. Kurtz Miller. 

11:20 — Psalms Lydia Stauffer 

p. m. 

1 :40 — Prayer Jesse Ziegler. 

The Great Teacher, J. G. Royer. 

2 :20 II Peter J. Kurtz Miller 

3 :oo — Sunday School. ... H. K. Ober. 

Missions W. B. Stover. 

3 :40 — Sacred Music, Katherine Miller. 

Evening 
6 :45 — Song Service, Katherine Miller. 
7:00— Sermon 

(a) January 15-19, J. G. Royer. 

(b) January 20-24, W. B. Stover. 
Special Programs 

Educational January 18, 1913. 

Temperance January 19, 1913 

Lecture "The New Era," Byron C. 
Piatt, January 21, 1913. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



Veni, Vidi Obii. 

"I came, I saw, I died." We hope 
this may be the fate of every college 
fraternity that has made its appearance 
in the nited States. Ursinus College 
has made a clean ftart in this direction. 
For, at a recent action of the Board of 
Directors of that institution, it was de- 
cided to cliss' Ive the fraternities exist- 
ing among the student body. Thi5 
Board is to be commended for the 
noble stand taken in promoting the 
cause of Christian education. We also 
believe thit e^'ery institution that har- 
bors these fraternities would feel more 
of a democratic atmosphere by a simi- 
lar dissolution of its secret societies. 
This stand taken at Ursinus College is 
due not only to the opinion of the 
Board of Directors but also to the 
Constitution of that school. 

That portion of the Ccnstitution 
which it has been decided "to hold to 
the letter," and which does not permit 
secret organizations to exist, and which 
should be incorporated into the consti- 
tution of every college in our land, 
reads as follows : "Students may 
organize religious, literary and other 
societies among themselves for mutual 
improvement, provided the constitu- 
ion, laws, workings, etc., of the propos- 
ed society are approved by the General 
Faculty, and are at all times open to its 
inspection, and all the meetings, exer- 
cises, and doings of such organization 
are at all times open to any member of 
said Faculty." 

In this day of organizations it is dif- 
ficult to find a society of any kind that 
does not possess some advantages or 
at least the possibility of advantages. 
But there is a distinction that must be 
made in the consideration of organ- 



izations. That society which exists, 
for the purpose of "mutal improve- 
ment" deserves to be fostered ; but, 
when its aim is to develop a clannish- 
ness of a certain class of students and' 
to disengage the powers of its members 
from their school work, it must be 
ousted. In short, there is too much? 
Christian manhood placed at stake for 
the wishy-washy benefits of a college,- 
fraternity. 

To the thoughtful person it is at 
once evident that no school can tolerate 
these college fraternities, the "ignes 
fatui" of so many students. In the 
first place, they are contrary to the 
Scriptures in their very organization; 
and influence on Christian character. 
When Divine Revelation tells us,. 
"Swear not at all," and not to take any 
oath whatsoever, no follower of Christ 
can take the initiatory oath of secrecy 
as required by many college frater- 
nities, and stand uncondemned before 
his Maker. Neither can a college 
graduate perform his duty to his com- 
nunity by promoting a caste system 
that is one of the greatest foes of the 
church ; viz., the lodge, with its falser 
claim of charity. 

Moreover, the college fraternity is 
too selfish. It destroys the natural 
environment of the young man at 
school and gives him a false view of 
life outside of college circles. Life in 
a college should be like that in an ideal 
family. Here the children all have 
their respective rights and privileges, 
and learn to respect each other. How 
different affairs are in a school that 
shelters fraternities ! The members 
of some fraternities and sororities 
"have no dealing" with those of a dif- 
ferent society and as a rule respect 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



neither the rights nor the privileges of 
the "barb." They are a select family 
which can be entered not at one's own 
free will and choice but by the consent 
of others. In course of time the fra- 
ternity becomes the prominent idea 
and not the individual in it. The 
"frat," as a result, becomes a slave to 
its environment which absorbs him 
instead of the good in it being absorbed 
by him. It is also true that many of 
the best students in our colleges and 
universities are never solicited for 
membership because of this preposter- 
ous mania for exclusiveness. After 
all, no fraternity is greater than a col- 
lege ; no college greater than an honest 
man ; and whatever tends to make a 
good "frat" out of a young man instead 
of an efficient collegs graduate, must 
be removed from the walls of an in- 
stitution at once. 

This clannishness of a "coterie" is 
closely akin to another of the great 
evils of college fraternities — the waste 
of time. It is pleasant to think of "the 
feast of reason and flow of soul" that 
may be had through the fellowship of 
like-minded persons. However, the 
average college "frat" enjoys no such 
thing in his meetings, but usually re- 
turns from a night of debauchery— 
from a feast of riotousness and flow 
of spirits. No one but a member of a 
college fraternity knows much about 
the hoodlum conduct found in some of 
these organizations and many a young 
man has admitted that his first drink 
was taken in the "frat" den. 

It is also a fact that the majority of 
the members of the college fraternities 



comes from the wealthy leisure class. 
This class of students never amounts 
to much unless they break away from 
the delusive idea that the prestige of 
belonging to a fraternity guarantees 
a successful career. At most, ease can 
never be appreciated fully by the man 
of leisure. Then, too, it is distressing 
to see college fraternity meetings 
drawing away talent that should be ex- 
ercised in the Literary and the Relig- 
ious Societies of the institution. W'e 
also hope many institutions may see 
the close relation of dormitory life to 
the life of the world and thus save their 
dormitories by ostracizing the abnor- 
mal life of the chapter house. 

This precedent set by Ursinus 
College should induce more schools to 
take a firm stand on this question of 
dissolving clubs and fraternities. Our 
sister institution has our hearty sym- 
pathy and cooperation in this progress- 
ive movement. 



Statement of Ownership, Manage- 
ment, Etc., of Our College Times, 
published monthly during the academic 
year at Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, 
as required by the Act of August 24, 
1912. 

Editor, Ralph W. Schlosser, Eliza- 
bethtown, Pa. 

Business Manager, J. D. Reber, 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Publisher, Elizabethtown College. 

Affirmed to and subscribed before 
me this sixteenth day of October, 1912. 
H. K. Ober, Notary Public, 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 

My Commission Expires March 16, 
1913- 




s 



c 


















t 



L 




We think of Thanksgiving in harvest 

time — 
In the yielding, gathering golden time ; 
When the sky is fringed with a hazy 

mist, 
And the blushing maples by frost lip 

kissed ; 
W^hen the barns are full with the 

harvest cheer, 
And the crowning, thankful day draws 

near. 

We think of Thanksgiving at resting 
time — 

"The circle completed is but a chime 

In the song of life, in the lives of men ; 

We harvest the toils of our years, and 
then 

We wait at the gate of the King's 
highway 

Por the dawn of our soul's Thanks- 
giving Day. 

— Rose Hartwich Thorpe. 

This Thanksgiving Day will surely 
Tdc a joyous one to the students of 
Elizabethtown College. For, on the 
day before the fall term for this year 
closes, examination week with its ex- 



tra strain and work will be over. 
Many students expect - to spend 
Thanksgiving Day at their homes de- 
spite the fact that a sumptuous dinner 
will be served in the College dining 
room. 

Old Winter King is making himself 
felt on College Hill and the work of 
his helper. Jack Frost, is becoming 
more noticeable morning after morn- 
ing. 

These winter nights, against our win- 
dow panes 

Young Frost with busy pencil draws 

designs 
Of ferns and blossoms and fine spray 

of pines, 
Oak-leaf and acorn and fantastic vines, 
Which Nature will produce when 

summer comes again — 
Quaint arabesques in argent, flat and 

cold, 
Like curious Chinese etchings. 

-T. B. Aldrich. 

The tennis season of this year is 
being closed with a tournament which 
is almost completed. 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Basket-ball is the game that is claim- 
ing the most attention in athletics at 
this time. Some interesting games have 
been played in the College Gymnasium. 
The first game of interest was played 
between the "Second Year German 
Class" and the "Lancaster County 
German" team and resulted in a defeat 
of the S. Y. Germans by a score of 29 
to 15. 

S. Y. German L. C. German 

Diehm center Becker 

Herr forward Kulp 

Reber forward Martin 

Kreider guard Brandt 

Root guard Eberly 

On the evening of November fif- 
teenth was played another very in- 
teresting game between the full "Ger- 
man" team and the "Lone Star" team. 
The Germans won the game by a hard 
fight with a score of 27 to 20. 

Lone Star Germans 

Geyer center. ...... Diehm 

Brandt guard Rose 

H'ershey guard Kreider 

Martin forward Herr 

Kulp forward. ..... Becker 

A change has been made in the time 
when we are to hear Col. Geo. W. Bain, 
the Kentucky orator, give us his 
famous lecture on "The New Woman 
and the Old Man." Col. Bain will 
give his lecture in the College Chapel 
on the evening of December ninth, at 
eight o'clock. Col. Bain is said to have 
done more good than any other man 
on the American lecture platform. No 
audience ever felt the sway of his ora- 
tory without a vision of a great person- 
ality, matchless in character, masterful 
in brain, sympathetic in heart, and sub- 
lime in purpose. Col. Bain has been 



here before and comes highly recom- 
mended, and so Montaigne's advice 
seems timely : 

"Be sure and come, be wise with speed. 
You who stay home are fools indeed."" 

The new Elizabethtown school build- 
ing has been completed and school 
work started for this year. 

Professor in Physics class : "What 
is an aquarium? 

MV. Rose: "It is an acid that takes 
the air out of the water." 

Dr. Turner, formerly President of 
Hastings College and at present an 
enthusiastic worker in the Chautauqua 
movement, visited the College on Oc- 
tober 29, and gave us an interesting" 
talk after Chapel Exercises. He is one 
of the men who is trying to secure a 
Chautauqua for Elizabethtown next 
summer. 

Miss Myer spent a few days in Phila- 
delphia during the Convention of the 
State Sabbath School Association. 

Every morning at 5 :45 a number 
(which varies considerably) of College 
boys can be seen taking a cross-coun- 
try run of almost two miles. The run- 
ners are claiming excellent results, ex- 
cepting Mr. Waltz, who since his 
twenty-ninth (?) birthday has had a 
bad attack of lumbago. 

On October 24, Messrs. Harley, Neflf, 
Kulp, and Heistand heard Gov. Hiranr 
Johnson render an enthusiastic sp^-ech 
at Harrisburg. 

Wilson was elected 

Just as we expected ; 

Teddy was rejected ; 

Taft was so afifected 

H'e had to be injected; 

Chafin was neglected ; 

Debs, he has corrected. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



The Concert given by Geo. P. Bible 
.and his accompanying artists proved 
to be all that it was recommended to 
be and seems to have been enjoyed 
.greatly by all who heard it. 

Mr. Kreider makes weekly visits to 
some place, not known ( ?) to us, a 
few miles from EHzabethtown. 

Miss Kathryn Miller, our music 
teacher, spent Sunday at home a few 
weeks ago. 

On November i8, Professor Isaac 
Hackman assumed his duties as Princi- 
pal of the Commercial Department of 
the school. He succeeds Professor I. 
E. Shoop. 

Miss Rhoda Miller will return to 
school at the opening of the Winter 
Term. 

It is reported that one of the ladies 
•desires to have a rose for the next lec- 
ture. Mr. Rose being anxious to know 
more about it found to his glad sur- 
prise that it was to be an ever blooming 
rose. 

Quite a few students attended the 
Lancaster County Institute and report 
having heard some excellent addresses. 

Professor: "Do you catch cold or do 
you get it." 

Miss Becker: "Neither, you take it." 

The parents of Mr. George Neflf, paid 
a visit to the College on November 23. 

Professor H. K. Ober is at present 
holding a series of meetings at 
Williamsburg, Pa. 

On November 17, Prof. Schlosser 
addressed a Children's Meeting at the 
Heidelberg Church, Lebanon County, 
preached a sermon in the evening at 
Richland. 

After studying about concyclic 



points in Geometry, and not under- 
standing them very well, Miss Bru- 
baker asked the teacher : "Professor, 
what are these cyclonic points, any- 
how?" 

Misses Rebekah Shaeffer and Naomi 
Longenecker visited Juniata College on 
Sunday, November 17. 

November 14, was an epoch making 
day for the school. It was the first 
time, outside of Thanksgiving Day, 
that the students received a chicken 
dinner. It was a meal much appreci- 
ated by the students. Keep up the 
good work. 

Miss Ruth Stayer spent a few days 
at her home in Bedford County. 

Philosopher Falkenstein says : "They 
say that courtship is the light of life, 
and then I suppose married life is the 
time to pay the gas bill." 

Dr. Reber spent the afternoon of Oc- 
tober 31, visiting public schools. 

Professor Harley has the honor of 
shooting a walrus (?) near the College 
campus. He has the skin in his room 
and it is open for inspection by any one 
who cares to examine it. He has had 
the College Seal impressed on it and 
it makes a fine addition to his room, 

John Swope returned to College Hill 
on October 29, after spending a few 
days at his home near Hershey. 

Miss Meyer, at the table, to a lady, 
who was visiting here a few days: 
"You know Mr. John Graham, don't 
you ?" 

Mrs. W : "Oh yes, he was around our 
place much when my niece was at 
home." 

We now understand why Miss W. is 
especially fond of "Johnnie" cakes and 
"Graham" wafers. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Miss Leah Sheaffer was called home 
for a few days to wait on her mother 
who had a severe fall. 

Mr. Waltz's translation of Horace 
III, i8, lines 15 and 16: 

"The toiler delights in beating the 
accursed earth with his third foot." 

The twelfth anniversary of the 
founding of Elizabethtown College 
was celebrated on Wednesday evening, 
November 20. The chief features of 
the program were : an oration by B. F. 
Waltz ; a recitation by Kathryn Miller ; 
and an address by Supt. L. E. Mc- 
Ginnes of Steelton. His theme "Whole- 
some Educational Agencies," was ably 
discussed and full of valuable sugges- 
tions for the student body. 

Who is "Nescis"? This is now the 
second poem written under this "nom 
de plume," and placed on the first page 
of the literary department. We know 
that "Nescis" means "you do not 
know," but perhaps the poet is better 
known than he thinks he is 

Competition is very keen on College 
Hill. No sooner had a photographer 
from Ohio taken a picture of our stud- 
ents and the buildings, than a reqquest 
came from our local photographer for 
the same privilege. It was granted. 
Now for the results. 

By the opening of the Winter Term 
many a turkey will have gobbled his 
last, because of a home coming son or 
daughter. 

Our janitor, Samuel Dennis, has had 
a badly sprained ankle but is now able 
to work again. 

On November tenth Professors Har- 
ley, Schlosser, and Meyer attended the 
Lancaster Love Feast. 



Professor Schlosser also addressed' 
the Mountville Children's Meeting in 
the afternoon of the same day. 

Professor in Physics class : "What 
controls evaporation?" 

Mr. Rose : "The larger the surface, 
the more the molecules are kicked out^ 
just the same as the more pigs in a pen 
the more can jump out." 

Professor in Physics class : "Do two 
ball rebound if they strike each 
other?" 

Miss B : "No, after the}^ hit each 
other they quiet down and stick to- 
gether." 

Mr. Kreider spent November tentb 
visiting friends in Palmyra. 

Miss M. Ada Douty : "My initials 
make me M A D." 

L. Anna Schwenk : "Mine make me- 
feel like an eighteen year old L A S."" 

Her chariot is an empty hazel-nut 
Made by the joiner squirrel or old grub^ 
Time out o' mind the fairies' coach- 
makers. 
And in this state she gallops night by 

night 
Through lovers' brains, and then they 

dream of love ; 
O'er courtiers' knees, that dream orr 

curtsies straight ; 
O'er lawyers' fingers, who straight 

dream on fees ; 
O'er ladies' lips, who straight on kisses. 

dream, 
Which oft the angry Mab with blisters; 

plagues. 
Because their breaths with sweetmeats. 

tainted are. 

We are now fully able to understand 
why Miss Kline has been carrying an 
extra large blister on her lips for the 
past few days. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



The "Wholesome Educational Agen- 
cies" which were so excellently dis- 
cussed by Supt. McGinnes follow: 

1 Minor Agencies or Supplements. 

1. Faculty. 

2. Management. 

3. Course of study. 

2 Major Agencies or World Supple- 
ments. 

(a) Unorganized. 

1. World of Nature. 

2. World of Art. 

3. World of Music. 

4. World of Reading. 

(b) Organized. 

1. World of Politics. 

2. World of the American Home. 
3 World of the Christian Church 

About a week ago when twenty blue 
Jerseys appeared on College Hill with 
the monogram, E. C. on them, many 
were the conjectures of what this 
monogram might signify. The most 
plausible of these guesses were: 

Christian Endeavor. 

College Eats. 

Christian Educator. 

Correct Englishman. 

Escaped Convicts. 
On one or two Jerseys it meant: 
"Come Edna." 

Professors Reber, Ober, Schlosser, 
and Meyer attended the Ministerial 
Meeting at Hershev. Mr. Gingrich 
was also present at this conference. 

Miss Landis in typewriting class : 
"Please excuse me from typewriting 
today. I fell on my foot and sprained 
it, so you see I won't be able to write." 

One of our enthusiastic Algebraists 
was so engrossed in that subject that 
he was more impressed with the fact 
the X, y, and z followed each other 
closely in a certain chapter of the Bible, 
than whh the sentiment of what he 
was reading. 



K. L. S. News 

The Keystone Literary Society met 
in regular executive session on Friday 
evening, October 18. Three students 
made application to become active 
members of the Society. 

The following program was then 
rendered : 
Music, "The Last Rose of Summer,'^ 

Mixed Quartet. 
Declamation, "October's Bright Blue 

Weather" E. D. Long. 

Essay, "Autumn". . . . Mabel Hoffman. 
Debate, Resolved, That Autumn is the 

most inspiring season of the year. 
Debated afifirmatively by Misses Irene 

Wise and 9mma Ziegler; negatively 

by Misses Gertrude Keller and Mary 

Ziegler. 
Recitation, "Only Sixteen," Lydia Mil- 
ler. 
Music, Piano Duet, Misses Sheaffer 

and Stayer. 

Oration Orville Becker 

German Reading, .C. J. Rose 

On Friday evening, October 25, the 
Society met in literary session and the 
following program was rendered : 
Vocal Solo. "The Mission of a Rose,"^ 

Sara Moyer. 
"Life of Hiram Johnson," Mr. Diehm 
Debate. Resolved, That music has a 

greater influence on mankind than 

oratory. 
Debated affirmatively by Miss Dennis- 

and Mr. Shelley; negatively by Miss 

Ruth Landis and Mr. Harry Royer. 

Reading Miss Heistand. 

Literary Echo. 

On November i, a business session of 
the Society was held at which the fol- 
lowing were elected to serve as officers- 
for the next month: 

Pres. — Mr. E. D. Long. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Vice Pres.— Mr. Owen Hershey. 
Sec — Miss Grace Moycr. 
Critic— Prof; J. G. Meyer. 
Editor— Miss Sara Moyer. 

The Keystone Literary Society met 
in regular executive session on Friday 
evening, November 22, 1912. This 
program which was of special interest 
to our Lancaster County friends fol- 
lows: 

Music. 

Geography of Lancaster County, 
Mary Minnich. 

History and Places of Historical 
Interest in Lancaster County, 

Edna Brubaker. 

Debate : Resolved, That Lancaster 
County has better educational facilities 
than any other county in Pennsylvania. 
Affirmative Negative. 

Anna Brubaker Helen Oellig 

E. G. Diehm C. J. Rose 

Music, "Far Away." 

Lancaster County's Noted Men of 
Today, John Graham. 

Lancaster County's Noted Men of 
the Past, Owen G. Hershey. 



Homerian News. 

The Homerians have been real active 
in their private meetings thus far. 
During the past few weeks the new 
Constitution was completed and adopt- 
ed. The following officers were also 
elected at a private meeting: Speaker, 
Laban Leiter; Vice Pres., B. F. Waltz; 
Secretary, Kathryn Miller; Monitor, 
Lydia Stauffer ; Chaplain, R. W. 
Schlosser. 

On the evening of November 8, a 
public program was rendered. Every 
feature was given in an excellent man- 
ner. The following numbers con- 
stituted the program : 

Prayer Chaplain. 

Recitation, "An Order for a Picture," 

Elizabeth Kline. 
Debate, Resolved, That our High 
Schools are Meeting the Demands of 

our Young People. 

Affirmative Speaker B. F. Waltz. 

Negative Speaker I. J. Kreider. 

Vocal Solo, "O Dry Those Tears," 

Elizabeth Kline. 

Address Dr. Reber. 

Interpretation and Rendition of Piano 

Compositions . . . .Leah M. Sheaffer. 
Critic's Remarks J. S. Harley. 




The Alumni editor wishes to correct 
a statement made several months ago. 
Mr. Isaiah E. Oberholtzer, 06, is not in 
attendance at the White Bible School, 
but is a student at the Northwestern 
Uuiversity of Evanston, near Chicago. 

Amos G. Hottenstein, '08, anticipates 
graduating, about Christmas time, 
from Goldey Business College, Wil- 
mington, Delaware. He has been a 
student there since June and is pre- 
paring for a business career. 

Henry J. Sheaffer, '11, is at present 
in Butte, Montana, but we are unable 
to say in what business he is engaged. 

Reuben F. King, '09, who had a 
position in Elizabethtown, has resigned 
and returned to his former home at 
Myerstown. 

The school is glad to announce that 
I. Z. Hackman, '07, has been secured 
to take charge of the Commercial De- 
partment. Reports say that he is do- 
ing well in his new sphere. 



E. R. Ruhl, '08, is at present teach- 
ing at Berwin, Pa. In connection 
with his work he is pursuing studies at 
the University of Pennsylvania. 

Miss May Dulebohn, '06, who also 
is a graduate of Millersville State Nor- 
mal School, is at present teaching in 
the Bainbridge High School. 

Our College Times extends hearty 
congratulations to Miss Opal Hofifman, 
'05, who has recently become Mrs. 
Harry Keener. Another Alumna 
leaving the ranks of single blessedness ! 

C. S. Livengood, '06, is now the 
proud father of twins, Samuel and 
Ruth. Two more names can be added 
to the cradle roll of E'town College. 

Ten graduates of the school as far as 
we can ascertain are now teaching in 
the Lancaster County public schools, 
and attended the sessions of the Insti- 
tute held during the week beginning 
November 11. 




Ye prospective humorists, this is 
for you : In several papers we find the 
manifestation of an eager, prevailing 
desire to be humorous. To this end 
many awkward methods are used. 
Nothing is more ridiculous than a 
"would-be-wit," one who would like to 
be humorous, one who tries hard to be 
a wit feut can not be witty. On the 
other hand., no one is more humorous- 
than he who is really serious, but who 
unpretentiously and simply, because 
such is his make up, commingles his 
seriousness with his humor. "You may 
say to be a wit one must surely practice 
to that end. Granted. But do not 
practice on the world, else before you 
are aware the world will be tired listen- 
ing to you. 

It is unnatural for a chicken to swim. 
It knows this and wisely never at- 
tempts it even though the neighborly 
ducks do it with ease and success. But 
we have "would-be-wits" who attempt 
iDcing humorous with no more success 
than the chicken that would try to 
swim. They go under. They collect 
from all the papers and magazines all 
the humorous expressions and jot down 



every joke they hear, thus taking them 
out of their natural setting, and isolat- 
ing them from the manner and expres- 
sion of the "real wit." These jokes are 
then arranged on a page, — sometimes 
six full pages — and called the humor- 
ous department. If such nonsense 
were humor one might collect enough 
of jokes to fill a book, publish them 
under one's own name, and be placed 
in the galaxy of illustrious humorists, 
but such is not humor. 

We find real humor illuminating the 
lines of the most serious literature. 
Irving, Mark Twain, and Riley give us 
such works. Humor, like sugar, is not 
pleasing when taken isolated from that 
which it was meant to sweeten. We 
want just a little "now and then." 
Otherwise we feel as the little boy who 
once in his life was allowed to eat all 
the sugar he desired. He stood with 
a painful look after eating a quantity, 
with one hand on the rim of the barrel 
and the other on his own rim, and pain- 
fully said, "I've gotten down in the 
barrel where the sugar ain't good no 
more." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



High school papers would do well by 
taking Purple and Gold as a model. 
Notice its general appearance, its cuts, 
its arrangement, its type, and its 
quality of paper. Read its articles in 
the literary department. As a high 
school paper we rank it among the best. 

The Lordsburg College Educator is 
neat, short, and to the point. Its ex- 
change greetings are original and 
humorous. It would be more signifi- 
cant if its cuts were not insignificant. 
"Today" deserves a reading. 



We wish to give the Albright Bulle- 
tin the comment it deserves. Its pages 
are not blotted with "would-be" wit- 
ticisms. There is a sense of order and 
neatness that runs through the entire 
paper. We like the manner in which 
the "Ideal Candidate" is treated. The 
writer does not try to elevate his man 
by pushing some one else down. How 
worthy ! 

The Perkiomenite is attractive. It 
is somewhat stricken with the "would- 
be-wit" epidemic. To be well bal- 
anced it needs more literary work. 



Try Mother's Bread— Home-Made. None 
Better, Fe-w as Good. 

D. H. BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTO'WN 



Tht baker who knows how. Phone or drop a postal 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO StrPPUES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



CENTRAL 



MEAT 



MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



H. H. GOOD 



EMZABETHTOWX 



UP TO DATE 



Shaving and Hair Cutting 



The Pratt 
Teachers' Agency 

70 Fifth AveMne 
Ne-w York 



R. H. SHISSLER. 



Receives calls at all seasons for college 
and normal grnduates, specialists and 
other teachers in colleges, public and 
private schools in all parts of the coun- 
try. 

Advises parents about schools. 

WM. O. PRATT, Manager 



Plain Suits, Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats. 

GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange St>., Lancaster, Pa. 

Elizabethtown Dental 
Parlors 

Office Closed Thursday 
and Friday 

8. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 

Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



26 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



■iiiiiiiiini;ii;ii'i.iBiiiiiiiiiiiBiimiiiiniiiiniii»iiii:fli:!iW''iBiiiiii^ 

College Jewelry cf the Better Sort M 

G. WhiTrEISNER I 

Manufacturing | 

Jevyeler 

Class Pins and Rings Prize Caps 

Fraternity Je-welry Medals 

120 East Chestnut Street. 
LANCASTER, PA. 

i!inii!iBiiiiniiiiiBiiiiiEiii!i^<:i:'ESiii:!^!;iiisiiiiiBiiiiiBiiiiiHiiiiwiiii 






* 
* 

* 
* 



LEO KOB 

Heating and 

Plumbing 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




Muth 



H. M. Muth 



MUTH BROS. 



Dealers in 



4' 
* 

* 
* 
* 

* 

* 

* 
* 
* 
* 

COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. % 

* 
* 
* 

* 

* 

* 

4* 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. * 

* 



LUMBER^ 

Also all kinds of building material 
and mill work, Slate and Cement, 
Wheeler Screens, Fertilizer, Patent 
Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board, etc. 



We also aim to give you a square 
deal that will ^merit your trade and 
friendship. . . 



DENTIST 

GEO. K. KERSEY 

Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



i WE DO IT RIGHT. 



Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES CBb SON 

F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 

Horseshoeing a Specialty. 

N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 



J. GROFF & SONS 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



\^ouiTy 



c'i5"> a » 



en 



side 



— if you vant '.-■. Ye3, in any posi- 
tion, any poc!;ct. 

Boys: carry the Parker Jack Knife 
r:n in your trousers pocket along 
\v: h your keys. 

Girls: carry it in tlie pocket of 
y;ur white blouse. 

I'lay football with it, — basketbcll, 
tennis, hockey. It's on the jcb t.he 
minute you want to wr te, without 
1 aving a pinhead spot of ink any- 
where it has been carried. 

Write? Just im g ne a pen of 
c'lss that melts to ink as you sLd^ it 
across paper! That's the way it writes. 

Price $2.50 up. Get one on trial. 
Take it back ar.y tine wiil.ia 10 
days if you're net ticLled to death 
wit'i it. We aulho'ize d a!cr to re- 
fund. If your dc.lcr do'-cn't carry 
Parkers, write us fcr catalog lod-.y. 

PARKER PEN COMPANY 
Mill St., Jjinesvi.le, Wis. 

PARKER 

cJack Knife Safety 

FOUNTAIN PEN 




For sale at the Bookroom. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 27 



1900 1912 

IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 

SE:vEN reasons : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Et^uipment. 

For further particulars, address 

Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN PA. 



■'W,...i.^i'lll'! 



28 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Exchange 



Bank 



Transacts a general banking business, pays in- 
terest on time deposits, solicits yonr jiatrona^ie 



A. G. HEISEY, Pres. 



OFFICERS 

ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 
.1 H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 



DIRECTORS 



A. G. Heisey Jos. G. Heisey 

Allen A. Coble Dr. H. K. Blough 

Di. A M. Kalbach 



B. H. Greider, H. J, Gish 

Henry E. Landis J. H. Buch 

Geo. D. Boggs E. E. Hernly 



I P. N. Kraybilll 

« Both 'Phones ^ 

Rheems. - Peun'a % 

Dealer in ^ 

Groceries, Dry Goods, Notions, T 
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers ^ 

— s 

Hardware, Paints, Oils, Turpen- | 
tine and Glass ^ 



^ Oilcloth, Linoleums, Matting, Win- 
dow Shades and Strips 



Soliciting a Share of Your Business ^ 



IIIH 



Warner's 

Corsets 

are the only corsets that are en- 
dorsed so fully and strongly to us. 
Guaranteed to shape fashion- 
ably, to fit comfortably, and not 
to rust, break or tear. 

You connot say any more in 
favor of a corset excepting to give 
its price — 

$1.00 to $2.00 Per Pair 

If we could say just the things 
that we say about Warner's Rust- 
Pi-oof Corsets, it would make 
any corset worth while ; but 
WARNER'S are the only corsets 
we can make this absolute state- 
ment regarding. 

Huntzberger-Winlers Co. 

ELIZABETHTO^TN, PA. 



IIBII 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



THE *'ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 



/T 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
Shipped every Wednesday 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



^ 



=J 



Sporting Goods 



Post Cards 



Agent for all periodicals. 

Pocket cutlery, toys, novelties, etc. 

Fine confections. 

H. K. Dorsheimer 

Bell 'Phone 38-3 
On the Square, Elizabethtown Pa. 



School Supplies 



Stationery 



John A. Fisher 



BARBER 



Crentre Sqnare, 



Elizabethto-nrn, Pa. 



♦ COLUMBIAN AND RED CROSS ♦ 

I Heaters and Ranges | 

The Finest Lines Made Z 



^ Jos. H. Rider & Son 

J ELIZABETHTOWN, - PA. 




D. B. KLINE 

CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



GEO. A. FISHER 

HARDWARE 

Automobiles 
Phonographs and 
Records 
F. P. GAS PLANTS 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4 ♦< 

ELIZABETHTOWN J 

ROLLER MILLS I 

J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades of 

FLOUR AND FEED 

Highest Cash Prices paid for grain, 
hay and straw 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. t 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of if our Patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 



The Bee Hive Store 



Siouth Market and Bainbridge Streets, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Dry Goods,Notions, Shoes, Carpets, Draperies and an Up-to-Date line 
Gent's and Ladies' Furnishings 

''SOMETHING NEW EVERY DAY" 



of 




The Duplex 

Recommends Literary 
and Commercial teachers 
Secretaries and Account- 
ants. Schools for sale. 
Circurlars free. Write 
for further information. 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



D. C. BRINSER 



Coal 



Grain, Flour, Feed, 
Seeds, Hay, Straw 
and Fertilizer. 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 



A farmer once to a certain age ^ 

/In the Lunch Room Business did en- ^ 

am. 
gage. 

T'was Nissley. 

Thousands of people now are fed. 

Pure, delicious, quick. Enough said. 

TRY NISSLEY 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. 



Lunches Telephones 

D. W. Ml ESSE 

Baker and Confectioner 

* 123 N. Queen St. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Ice Cream Water Ice 



* 
* 
* 



Ursinus College 






COLLEGEVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA J 



(24 miles from Philadelphia.) 



Organized and administered under the Group Sys- 
f tem of Instruction, providing both liberal culture and 
«!• special preparation for the various vocations, an 
4» arrangement presenting exceptional advantages for «!► 
•!• efficiency and economy All groups open to women 
as well as men Write for special bulletin and 



* 



•!• descriptive pamphlet. 

T A. Edwin Keigwin D.D., President. 
* Geo. Leslie Omwake, Pd.D., Vice-Pres. 

Iiitii.it.ii.i.iittntmt.i.f 







Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, 
Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletio 
Shoes. Kodaks .and Cameras, de- 
veloping and finishing. 

H. B. H E R R 
30-32 West King Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 



IJII 



IF ITS MUSIC OR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, WE HAVE IT! 



IRitR Johnson Si Co. 



MUSIC HALL 
16-18 West King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 

iiiniHiiiiHyiHiiiiiaiittiaiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiBiii'iiBiiniiuiniiiiaiiHinioaiiii^^ 



Mention Our College Times When Writing, 



31 



******* A*-*-**«*#*4**-***-**A** ************************************ 

Mail Orders Solicited for I 
Books and Bibles I 

THE BOOK STORE 



C. N. FALKENSTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa 






(painting anb IPaper 
Ibanging 

AMOS B. DRACE 

Ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 

Catalogues a Specialty 

311 W. Grant St., LANCASTER, PA. 



/T 



S. G. GRAYBILL 



=^ 



/y 



•'Z ' 



J&-^~.'Z>i"'>'i.^^-' 



\: 



College Hill Dairy 

Fresh milii and cream daily. All milk 
tested for children; free from tuberculosis 

HOTELS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED 



:^ 



REBER WAGONS! 

is the cry of man and horse. The 
horse says "It pulls so easy" and the 
man says "It rides so nice and lasts 
so long." So come my neighbor, get 
yourself such an outfit and be pleased 
yet more than that. 

REBER WAGON WORKS 
Centreport, Pa. 



TAKE YOURo 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morning. 
Returns Wednesday and Friday afternoon. 

CALL AT 
RALPH GROSS SHAVING PARLOR! 
Conducted on sanitary principles. 

Massaging a Specialty. 
Agency of First-Class Laundry. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PBNNA. 



I O. iV. HEISEY I 

3 . ^ 

1^ Provisions, Groceries, CS, Choice Candies ^ 



:^ HEISEY BUIIiDING 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. ^ 



'^(fyiMf>(0(f\(iyff\^fy(fy(f>(f>(f>(f>(f>(f^'ff>^f>'^fMf\(f\(fyff\(fyf^^ 



32 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-Made Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 



North East Corner Centre Square, 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



JACOB HSHER 
Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, Ellzabethtown, Penna. 

With you for 31 years. That's All 

E. H. LEHMAN 
COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR. 

Telephone 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Bell and Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers In 

New and Old Books 

46 E. King St., Lancaster, Pa. 

CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Young 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

W. R. Ashenfelter I 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied with 
Fancy Cakes at short notice. 



S. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
will convince. Work iruaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Ellzabethtown Pa. 



Ind. Phone 



Hours 8 to 6 



DR. JEROME G. HESS 
DENTIST 



Hertzler Bldg. 
Ellzabethtown Pa. 




Ebersole & Bane/ 

Dealers in 

Choice Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and. 

Coffees, Fresh Country Butter and Eggs 

Bell Phone Ellzabethtown, Penna 



We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 



Y. M. C. A. Bldg., 



Lancaster, Pa. 



V w w w W^ w w» w W^ 

Ih. h. BRAND7 

T Dealer in 

♦ ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 

♦ SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 

♦ 

i — 



▼ Blizabethtown, 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^ 



Penna. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



"It's not what we say we do; 
It's what we do." 

How often have you read the promises of men? 

How often have you paid the penalty afterwards? 

We often question the advisability of telling about 
the clothes we sell, for talk is cheap. However, there is' 
only one way to interest the man who doesn't know us 
and that is to advertise. So, we are forced to use this 
method of getting in touch with you. 

This advertisement is not going to say a single word 
about our clothes. Its only object is to invite you to 
visit our shop. When you arrive here we'll show you. 

Can we hope to see you soon? 

"FOLLOW THE ARROW" TO 

S. M. MYRES & CO. 

CLOTHIERS — FURNISHERS — HATTERS 
12 East King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Hertzler's Department Store 




Your needs supplied at satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, Groceries, Ready-to-Wear Clothing tor Men 
and Women of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oilcloth 
Shoes, Etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-Measure 



CLOTHING 



International Tailoring Co., New York. 
American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chicago. 
Up-to-Date Samples on Hand. 



Black Cat 

^ • HERTZLER BROS. & CO. 

frj[031©]fy ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

Elizabfithtown National Bank 

Capital Surplus and Profits $157,000.00 



General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid on special 
deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 





DIRECTORS 




W. S. Smith 


Elmer W. Strickler 


Peter N. Rutt 


P. W. Groff 


J. S. Risser 


B. L. Geyer 


E. C. Ginder 


Amos G. Coble 


E. E. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



Carl Schlotzhauer 

The Students Official 
Pliotographier 



: 



J2f 



Don't have your Pho- 
tos taken anywhere else 
or you will regret it. 

You are invited to vis- 
it our studio and notice 
the 1912 Photography, 
something new and differ- 
ent than you have ever 
seen before. 



£f 



SPECIAL RATE TO STUDENTS 

163 N. Queen St. 

OPPOSITE HOTEL WHEATLAND 



y^MMWwwvw^ 



We Are Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made to Order 



Clothing 

In This Country 



When in Lancaster it will pay 
you to visit ours, the ' only 
Clothing Store in that city that 
has One Price to All and gives 
discounts to none. See us for 

MEN'S READY MADE AND 
MADE TO ORDER 

Clothing 

AND 

I Furnishing 

YOUTH'S AND BOYS' 
CLOTHING 



Hlrsh & Bro. 

Since 1854 at 

Centre Square, Next to City Hail 

LANCASTER, .PA. 




Q^Tf/y^ 




PROSPECT AND RETROSPECT 1 



RESULTS OF EUROPEAN IMMIGRATION INTO THE 

UNITED STATES G 

HOW JOHN SUCCEEDED 1) 

EDITORIALS 31' b 

IT OUR OUTLOOK ? I'o 

NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS 14 

Vv^LL YOU DO THE SAME? 16 



SCHOOL NOTES 17-21 

KEYSTONE L. S 19 

HOMERIAN L. S 20 

THE ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE BIBLE TERM 20 

ALUMNI . 22 



EXCHANGES 



24 



®ur fflnll^g^ Sltm^s 



Vol. X Elizabjcthtown, Pa , January, 1918 * No. 4 



Prospect and Retrospect. 



At the gateway which leads from the old to the new 

I reflect as the old year recedes from my view 
On its heartaches and raptures its laughter and tears 

Till it fades from my sight with the vanishing years. 
Tinted clouds decked the west on this bright New Year's eve. 

Glorious rises the sun on this glad New Year's morn, 
And each heart beats with eagerness garlands to weave 

Of the blossoms of hope which our pathway adorn. 

Expectation's sweet dream is a pearl beyond price, 

And a talisman 'gainst the enchantment of vice; 
No mirage luring on to destruction's abyss, 

But a star that will guide to inefifable bliss. 
And the pictures of memory bring loveliest cheer 

To the pilgrim who plods toward eternity's shore. 
O, the blest recollection of faces so dear ! 

O, the longing to greet them in Heaven once more ! 

They have joy in the evening wiio spend the day well 

And their deep satisfaction no mortal can tell 
As they pause at the close of their sojourn on earth 

To look back o'er a life of devotion and worth, 
As they turn to the heights where the shimmering gates 

Which admit the lone traveler to mansions of rest 
Invite them to enter where ecstasy waits 

And forever rejoice in the home of the blest. 

— Nescis. 



Results of European Immigration Into the 
United States. 



J. D. Reber. 



Immigration has been a problem in 
America from almost the beginning of 
its colonization. Governor Thomas 
Dongan in 1685 made a report to the 
King of England, full of dreadful fore- 
bodings as to the future of the Royal 
Province of New England unless the 
tendancy to overcrowding were pro<iipt 
ly checked. It was regarded with mis- 
trust by some of the framers of our 
Constitution. Geo. Washington and 
Thomas Jefiferson both are said to have 
been advocates of a restricted policy of 
immigration. An alien law was passed 
in John Adams' administration and it 
was again considered at the Hartford 
Convention in 1812. And ever since 
no considerable period of time has elap- 
sed during which this question has not 
been agitated and debated with plausi- 
ble arguments. 

In the earlier days it was indeed nec- 
essary that we should receive recruits 
to populate quickly our vast country. 
But there was danger even at that time 
as can be seen by the several factions 
which existed during the Revolution- 
ary War — the Wigs and the Tories. 
But even these were largely of Teu- 
tonic stock. Today it is not so. 

Today the tide of immigration has 
changed. Instead of receiving immi- 
grants from northwestern Europe, 
whence our ancestors hailed, we are 



now receiving the worst from the more 
undesirable Slavonic races from the 
Mediterranean coast. Even these 
might not be so despised were it not 
for the fact that there is an annual in- 
crease in numbers coming to this coun- 
try which, if continued, we fear our 
American people cannot assimilate. 
Should we not be alarmed when we 
know that New York City is the larg- 
est German city in the world, except 
Berlin ; the largest Italian city, except 
Rome ; the largest Polish city, except 
Warsaw; and by far the largest Jew- 
ish city in the world, and has a total 
population of foreign parentage of 76.9 
per cent, of its entire population? 

It seems that the United States has 
been the melting pot of all the nations. 
It is receiving more immigrants than 
all the other countries in the world 
combined. It seems that when people 
become so unfortunate and poverty- 
stricken, they come to America to be 
recast. 

It is true that we need laborers in this 
country ; but when we think of the fact 
that there are over ten million people 
in the United States who are living be- 
low the poverty line and approach pau- 
perism, we can scarcely think it just 
for these unskilled and illiterate people 
to come and reduce wages so that our 
own unskilled population is left unem- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ployed. The employment of foreign 
labor, then, is an advantage to the man- 
ufacturer as far as expense is con- 
cerned, but the country at large has to 
suffer by supj)orting those ten million 
who are practically debarred from un- 
skilled labor, or else they have to work 
at the same low figure as the foreigner. 
Especially is this the case when for- 
eigners are concentrated into special 
•fKcupations in the cities, where for a 
time they are willing to work for star- 
vation wages in order to get on their 
feet. They can and do for a consider- 
able time ruin all decent workers' pros- 
pects, depress wages below an endur- 
able point and drive natives out of em- 
ployment after extreme distress. 
There is no use then of having high 
protective tariffs to protect American 
laborers. It simply means no work for 
the unskilled American, comparatively 
high wpges for the foreigner, and ex- 
traordinary wages for our skilled 
rrien. To become more socialistic in 
view and to hit the issue fair and 
square would not be so much to re- 
adjust the tariff, as to exclude unskilled 
foreign labor. 

Moreover, a very high percentage of 
these foreigners, especially those frorn 
the Mediterranean coast are illiterate 
even in their native language. They 
will then associate with their own class 
and become clannish. Usually they 
have only enough money to land them- 
selves at an American port. They will 
then seek their own colony in that or 
in a nearby city and will sell their 
labor at any price so that they may get 
a start. At these low wages it is im- 
possible for them to enter society and 
seek advancement. 

Since they assemble so invariably 



with their own class, many do not even 
entertain a desire to mingle with the 
Americans. The result is only too evi- 
dent if one of these districts is visited. 
The very outward appearance of whole 
streets is foreign to any American. 
They lose respect for their person and 
dress, a thing which also disqualifies 
them to enter our society; or if they do 
enter, it is sure to show its degrading 
effect. Here is where we find our pau- 
pers, the lunatics who fill our asylums, 
and the infamous who are a puzzle for 
city government. In 1890 there were 
almost four times as many foreign born 
as native born paupers in the LTnited 
States. As to insanity, there is a con- 
siderably greater tendency to'it in the 
foreigner than in the native, probably 
due to a greater average debility of 
constitution, which shows itself in the 
brain as well as in other organs. 

Many of them come without their 
families, intending soon to return with 
a nice fortune of American capital. This 
has increased the male population 
of our country far beyond the female 
population. About two-thirds of 
all the immigrants into the 
United States have been males. 
The influence for evil of such a mispro- 
portion of sexes is almost obvious 
since the numerical equality of sexes 
in society is important. , 

Statistics also show that immigra- 
tion really has not increased the popu- 
lation. Birth rates have decreased in 
direct proportion to the rate of increase 
of immigration. At least the popula- 
tion in 1840, prior to which time im- 
migration was so small as to be scarce- 
ly noticed, increased just as rapidly as 
it did in later years when we were re- 
ceiving from half a million to a million 



8 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



immigrants a year. While this is true 
in the North, the South, which receives 
only a very small percentage of immi- 
grants, has kept up its regular rate of 
increase. 

Those who have families rear their 
children mostly in the slums where 
they are often abused and not afforded 
proper educational facilities. From 
this we may deduce that they become 
more bold and impudent. It is known 
to be a fact that the highest percentage 
of crime is among those born of foreign 
parents. This is especially true of the 
southern Italian and some other Medi- 
terranean peoples. 

Their illiteracy also disqualifies them 
to take an active part in the welfare of 
our nation. In the first place, many do 
not wish to stay longer than to acquire 
a fortune and, consequently, can do 
nothing for the government. On the 
other hand those who do enter our so- 
ciety and become citizens are danger- 
ous, for they come with European 
notions and ideals of freedom. They 
fail to grasp the real conception of 
American liberty, as it must be in an 
Anglo-American republic. They loved 
their fatherland before they loved ours 



and therefore will always have some 
admiration for European institutions. 
Hence they cannot speedily rise to the 
highest plane of American patriotism. 
They are quickly naturalized and al- 
lowed the privilege of voting and hold- 
ing office. While their votes are not 
necessarily more easily bought, yet 
they are more easily controlled by po- 
litical bosses. 

Probably the greatest reason why 
the present immigrants are undesirable 
is because they are not of the same 
stock as the founders of this country 
and, consequently, will not .assimilate 
as quickly as the former tide from the 
north-western part of Europe. It is 
said that these people have no history 
behind them which tends to give en- 
couragement. Their history reveals 
that that their whole social life has 
been different from ours. They have 
none of the inherited instincts and 
tendencies which made it comparative- 
ly easy to deal with the immigrants of 
earlier times. They are beaten men 
from beaten races, representing the 
worst failures, in a struggle for exis- 
tence. 



How John Succeeded. 



H. H. Nye. 



Some years ago in one of the German 
districts of Lancaster county, the home 
of Abe Sherman, a typical German 
farmer, was blest with a little son 
whose name was John. Here in this 
simple and uncultured home John was 
destined to pass his early days. The 
old German farmer, as we all know, is 
characterized by a deep interest in the 
tilling of the soil, an intense eagerness 
for making money — not only making it 
but also holding it — a strong tenacity 
to simple customs of living, and above 
all, by a marked contempt and resent- 
ment of higher education. 

In a home of this character John 
passed his first fourteen years. He was 
well initiated into the rugged, brawn - 
producing jobs of farm life; he learned 
the harsh mode of the German expres- 
sion, and acquired the free and unre- 
strained habits of country life. With 
these resources John had gradually 
grown to school age. 

By and by school opened in the little 
red school house on Chestnut Hill and 
little John plodded up the hill with a 
heavy heart as he turned over and over 
in his little mind the strange life which 
he was about to begin. He received no 
encouragement at home to enter upon 
this new crisis in his life. 

The teacher that year was Miss 
Mary Adams and she was just the right 
kind of teacher for a district of that 
kind. She met John at the door and 
greeted him with a pleasant "Good 



morning." Now for the first time 
John had an opportunity of using the 
few words of English which he had 
heard before, and which were at his 
command. She took him inside, di- 
rected him to the little seat where he 
should spend the winter and learn the 
little things to which his mind was now 
an entire stranger. , 

In half an hour school Avas called 
and John resumed his seat for the first 
day's work. He wildly cast about his 
eyes in every direction, stared into 
every nook and corner, and observed 
carefully the many new things which 
the schoolroom presented, and which 
were especially productive of anxiety 
and timidity because of the various ex- 
citing descriptions given them by his 
elders. 

After the school had been supplied 
with their necessary books and ma- 
terial for work, their lessons were as- 
signed them for that day and soon 
there was a hum of the busy boys and 
girls conning over their tasks. John's 
class was called to the platform first. 
It consisted of five boys and two girls 
besides himself. John stood trembling 
and gazed timidly into the eyes of his 
teacher. 

Miss Adams' first plan was to give 
this little class an object lesson on the 
dog. She procured a large picture of 
a dog from her desk and held it before 
the children's eager eyes. She then 
gave a pleasing introduction to her 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



first lesson and proceeded to ask, 
"What do you see on the picture, 
children?" 

Just two hands went up, for the 
children were yet too timid to express 
themselves. But Miss Adams ex- 
plained carefully what she meant and 
asked them to raise their hands if they 
knew. "Now how many know what 
this is in the picture? All who know 
may raise their hands." 

Up went all the hands of the child- 
ren but one. John who was now 
aroused by the teacher's kind words, 
which words were entire strangers in 
his home, had raised both hands high 
and an eager desire for answering was 
shown on his face. Since John stood 
at the end of the little row, Miss 
Adams gave him the first opportunity 
of answering. "Now John, what do 
you see on the picture?" she asked him 
kindly. 

"It's a Hund, dat's what it is," said 
John with vigor. The whole school 
burst into laughter at John's comical 
answer, though scarcely any of the 
pupils had much of a margin over 
John's command of English. 

"Now John, we'll call it a dog. That's 
one of the new words we want to 
learn today. Now will you say for me, 
Tt is a dog?' " 

"It is a dowd," responded John 
frankly. 

"That's better already," said Miss 
Adams and then continued to have him 
repeat it until she noticed improvement 
in articulation. 

Then she asked the children one 
after another what a dog could do. 
This time she began at the other end 
of the line. One by one they respond- 
ed with different answers until the turn 
came to Willie Frey who was still too 



timid to respond. But when she re- 
ceived no response from him she no- 
ticed that John's face was again full of 
eagerness to answer. Turning to him, 
she asked, "What do you think he can 
do, John?" 

"A dawd can shump," replied John 
hurriedly. All eyes were again turned 
on John for a hearty laugh. But again 
Miss Adams proceeded in her usual 
sympathetic way to correct him. 

With three more exercises like this 
the first day of school was over. But 
John took a liking to his teacher's kind 
disposition from the start and soon had 
a special craving to go to school. He 
soon liked it so well that he showed an 
aversion for going home in the evening. 
For he knew that nothing but unkind 
words and cruel treatment should greet 
him there. 

Miss Adams taught at Chestnut Hill 
for six years in succession which thing 
was a great advantage to John, for 
each year he gained more interest. 
But John was given no encouragement 
in his school work at home, for as soon 
as he returned from school he was or- 
dered to the barn to help feed the cattle 
or else to the field to assist in handling 
the tobacco or husking and hauling the 
corn. Even the long winter evenings 
were taken up by running errands, 
stripping tobacco, and doing chores 
about the home. 

"My children shall learn to work and 1 
shall not waste dar time in school when 
they have learned enuf. If they 
schtudy in school dey don' need 'o 
schtudy in de evenin.' Dey dar not sit 
up evenin's and read dese here novels 
and newsbapers. It is not necessary 
to waste de candle light for readin' 
dem sings. I shall never allow it in 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



dis house. People dese days want too 
much adykashion so dey don' need 'o 
work," was Mr. Sherman's educational 
creed. 

When John was eleven years of age 
he was fairly advanced in his class 
work, for Miss Adams showed a special 
interest in him because of his meager 
advantages at home. By this time she 
wanted to start John in supplementary 
reading and tried to induce him to read 
"Treasure Island," So one evening 
John took it with him to his home to 
read part of it. 

Upon his return home that evening he 
spoke especially much concerning the 
kindness and interest of his teacher but 
deeper than that he was trying to for- 
mulate a plan for reading his book. It 
happened that evening that the family 
retired very early, as is the custom 
among early rising and hard-working 
farmers. John sneaked to his room 
very quietly and there he decided to 
light his candle and sit on his bed to 
read the book. He did this and sat 
there reading until eleven o'clock that 
night. 

He did this successfully for three 
evenings, for no one detected the mat- 
ter. One morning he forgot to take 
the book with him but had let it lie on 
the table in his bed room. When 
his mother entered the room that day 
she happened to spy the tale of ad- 
venture and also noticed that the 
candlestick was nearly consumed. At 
once she detected the error of her son 
and prepared to relate the details to 
Mr. Sherman at her first opportunity. 

That noon when Mr. Sherman came 
for dinner there was a great uproar in 
that household. As soon as the family 
was seated at the table, Mrs. Sherman 
"broke forth in her rage : 



"What do you think, Abe, I belief 
dat John is readin' one of dese here 
novels for dere is a book lyin' on the 
table upstairs and I beleef he was read- 
in' last night for the candle is almost 
burned up !" 

"Bring me de book here once," thun- 
dered Mr. Sherman to his little daugh- 
ter Mary. 

Little Mary brought the book at once 
and Mr. Sherman putting on his spec- 
tacles, reads : "Dresher Eyeland." Go- 
ing through the book he said, "Dere 
ain't no earthly youse in readin' 
schtuff o' dis here kind. I'll tan him 
goot dis evenin' when he git's back." 

That evening a conversation took 
place between John and his- father in 
regard to reading the book. 

"Have you bin readin' dis book, 
'Dresher Eye-land,' John?" inquired his 
father. 

"I — I — I have, pop," replied John. 
"Miss Mary wants me to read it and 
you know she is such a good teacher, 
and, pop, it's such a good story, too." 

"Well now you know dat I don' wan' 
you to read such sings wot are not goot 
for boys and wot ain't of any earthly 
youse at all. I must punish you kom- 
bleet for dis here, John," were the 
father's closing words. 

When John had acknowledged his 
guilt, Mr. Sherman procured his willow 
rod and gave John a sound beating so 
that he might never attempt to read 
another novel. John cried bitterly and, 
instead of eating supper that evening, 
went to bed sobbing and moaning with 
pain. His father saf at the table and 
scolded without ceasing for his son's 
transgression. 

The next morning John would not 
get. up when his mother called for he 
was still suffering from the bruises and 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



sores caused by his father's brutality. 
He said that he was too stiff and sore 
to get up for several days and that he 
needed the services of a doctor. The 
doctor was called and he cared for the 
unfortunate boy. When Mr. Sherman 
saw his serious mistake his heart was 
touched, for he really dropped a 
few tears when he asked John's for- 
giveness. , 

When Miss Adams heard of John's 
misfortune she came to visit and com- 
fort him. When she entered his room 
and saw the misery painted on his face, 
she broke down in tears of deep sym- 
pathy for the boy in whom she was so 
greatly concerned. John related the 
sad story of his punishment but stated 
that he thought his father would 
be more reasonable in the future. 

"Well I hope and trust that you may 
soon recover and be back to school," 
began Miss Adams kindly. "I am very 
sorry that you must suffer for my in- 
structions to you. I shall try to plead 
with your father in behalf of your wel- 
fare. I hope that your misfortune may 
teach him a lesson of toleration and 
sympathy." 

Upon that she bade her little friend 
goodbye and proceeded to meet his par- 
ents. She met them both in the dining 
room and at once began to express her 
sorrow for the misunderstanding which 
had occurred between them. She 
pleaded with John's father that he 
should be more thoughtful and sympa- 
thetic thereafter and begged that he 
should show more interest in the school 
He thought that he would try to be 
more thoughtful in the future. With 
this satisfaction. Miss Adams returned 
home. 

John was in bed for two days and 
after four days he was back to school 



again. He returned his book now for 
he had lost all interest in it. For the 
rest of that term Miss Adams took 
more than usual interest in John not 
simply on account of his misfortune 
but also because it was to be her last 
term at Chestnut Hill. 

At the end of that year John bade 
farewell to his good friend, and when 
he spoke his last words of commenda- 
tion to her, she gave him good ad- 
vice concerning his further school 
work, he could not refrain from tears. 
John often looked back with pleasant 
memories to his early school days and 
to his untiring teacher, later in life, 
and even when John was grown up he 
received letters from her inquiring 
about his welfare. 

During the next two terms the 
school was taught by Thomas Watson. 
He was of a more surly and tactless 
disposition and not nearly so success- 
ful as his predecessor. However, John 
made the best of it and attended regu- 
larly — provided his father found no 
work for him. 

When John was fourteen years old 
his father thought that he no longer 
needed him at home for his farm was 
not very large and, besides, John's 
brothers and sisters were now old 
enough to begin farm work. So Mr. 
Sherman concluded that John should 
"hire out'" and earn some money. 

His uncle, Jerry Halk, needed a boy 
of the size of John to help him, and so 
he hired John for two dollars a week 
provided — that he should bring all his 
earnings home and should not buy 
anything or spend any of it without his 
permission. 

(To be Continued) 




EDITORIAL BOARD. 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, '11, Editor-in-Chief 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 



Obville Z. Becker, '15 School Notes 

Nora L. Reber, '11 Homerian News 

Mary Scheaffek, '13: K. L. S. News 

Leah Sheaffer, '09 Alumni Notes 



C. L. Martin, '13 Exchanges 

J. D. Reber, '14 Bus. Mut. 

A. L. Reber, '13 Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Daisy P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



Our College Times is published moothly during the Academic year by Elizabethtown College, 

Arrearage on subscription to this paper is charged. 

Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates : — Fifty cents per year ; ten cents per copy ; five years for $2.00. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown PostotEce. 



Our Outlook, 

To all our patrons and friends we 
wish a Happy New Year. 

To us the philosophy of ideal life is 
embraced in the above state- 

ment. No one can enjoy life who is 
not happy ; consequently, whoever can 
dispel worry and care has a claim to 
happiness. So we wish you happiness 
with the hope that it may make you 
appreciate life more fully. Then, too, 
it is a difficult thing for an unhappy 
person to extend wishes for happiness. 
No one can give that which he does not 



possess. It is just because of this sig- 
nificant fact that we as an institution 
can truly extend our New Year's 
wishes to our many friends and pa- 
trons. 

In the first place, our enrollment for 
the fall term last year was one hun- 
dred and thirty-four. This enrollment 
is an increase of twenty-four per cent. 
over that of the previous fall term, and 
an increase of eleven per cent., over the 
largest fall term enrollment of Eliza- 
bethtown College. This gives us great 
hopes for the future, and at the same 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



time shows us that our efforts are being 
appreciated. We feel that we are 
growing and making friends. So from 
this standpoint we feel happy. 

We are informed that Elders S. H. 
Hertzler and Jesse Ziegler have been 
appointed to solicit funds for the liqui- 
dation of the College debt. With these 
efficient men in the field we feel confi- 
dent that this purpose will not be de- 
feated. May we do what is in our 
power when they call, and thus sup- 
port this worthy cause. Why should 
we as an institution feel anxiety when 
we see loyal support in the Eastern 
District of Pennsylvania that we know 
will rally to our assistance? 

There is also the best of feeling be- 
tween the members of the faculty, be- 
tween the faculty and the trustees, and 
between the faculty and the students. 
This, evidently, is not the condition in 
all schools at present. We feel to con- 
gratulate every one who has assisted in 
bringing about this mutual relation, 
and pray for its continuance during the 
school year. In unity there is 
strength, and so again we cannot feel 
otherwise than be happy. 

We must state one more thing. The 
most promising Bible term ever held on 
College Hill is about to open. We have 
arranged for an excellent corps of 
teachers, and have the promise of a 
number of our friends to be with us 
on that occasion. The program for the 
session is printed in this issue. We 
feel sure that this Bible Term will re- 
sult in resolutions for greater effort 
and greater sacrifice for the Master. 
With these brilliant prospects before 
us we can not be otherwise than happy. 
So we again extend to you an invita- 
tion to be present at our Bible Term, 



which opens January 15 and closes 
January 24. A Happy New Year to 
all! 



New Year's Resolutions. 

As we enter upon this New Year 
every one of us is confronted by differ- 
ent views of life, different social prob- 
lems, and different religious duties. 
For the work of one year is never the 
same as that of any other. So it is 
evident that new purposes are in the 
minds of many men, who necessarily 
have entered upon new resolutions. 
Now, then, just what do we mean by 
forming a resolution? It is a fixed de- 
termination for the purpose of attain- 
ing some aim. This aim may be noble 
or degrading, since it depends on the 
moral status of the individual. 

As we look over a list of common 
expressions we find no phrase more 
commonplace than "New Year's Reso- 
lutions." There is much similarity in 
two phases of the subject; viz., in 
forming them, and in breaking them. 
It is a fact that many resolutions are 
made on New Year because it is cus- 
tomary to do so. Such resolutions are 
far from a fixed purpose of heart and 
are of no benefit to the one making 
them. They are rather a detriment to 
his better self. They teach him to 
make a statement and then to care lit- 
tle about abiding by it. It leads to in- 
sincerity. Then, again, it is equally 
true that such resolutions are quickly 
broken. For, to the one who has not 
purposed in his heart, a resolution has 
little weight. Breaking it is an insig- 
nificant matter. In such a process the 
one forming a resolution is greatly 
weakened, because he is training him- 
self to regard his opinions and decis- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



ions of small import. Therefore, in 
the making, and in the breaking of 
such meaningless "New Year's Resolu- 
tions," there is a decided injury to the 
better nature of the individual. 

Should resolutions, then, be made on 
New Year's Day? We ask in return, 
the question, "Why not?" There sure- 
ly is no harm in making a resolution on 
New Year's Day, for the injury does 
not lie in making the resolution, but 
in the purpose which prompts the 
statement. The question, however, is, 
"Shall we make our resolutions on New 
Year?" We believe there is some di-. 
versity of opinion on this question. 
Shall the student on entering school at 
once decide that he will put forth his 
best efforts, or wait until New Year? 
Shall the business -man purpose to 
make his business a success the first 
day he enters upon it, or wait until 
New Year? Shall the farmer in taking 
a farm decide to be the best farmer in 
the neighborhood at once, or wait until 
New Year? Shall the sinsick soul on 
hearing the call to lead a better life re- 
solve to go to the Savior at once, or 
wait until New Year? We all must say 
that they should decide at once to do 
their respective duties in order to se- 
cure the greatest blessings,. Shake- 
speare solves this matter of forming 
resolutions in these words : 
"There is a tide in the affairs of men. 
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to 

fortune ; 
Omitted, all the voyage of their life 
Is bound in shallows and in miseries." 

From the above statements it is 
evident that there are particular days 
for particular resolutions. If the mo- 
ment for a decision comes December 
31, then is the time to decide. If some 



important work is assigned you Janu- 
ary 2, then is the moment to decide to 
do the best there is in you. Generally 
speaking, then, it is evident that the 
time for forming a resolution is that 
moment when duty calls for your de- 
cision with reference to some project. 

We believe also that man should not 
be merely passive in forming resolu- 
tions but also aggressive. We can 
fully understand this when we consider 
the fact that life is a sum total of posi- 
tive, and negative forces. Hence we 
must form resolutions relative to 
growth. When we perceive certain 
things to be injurious to our bodies, we 
must resolve to rid ourselves of these 
evil influences. These resolutions are 
due to the passivity of human consci- 
ousness expressing itself in will power. 
Resolutions not to smoke, to chew, to 
swear, to drink intoxicating liquor, and 
to lie are as a rule made from this 
standpoint. On the other hand, when 
we see the value of truth, love, purity, 
and service, we feel that it is our duty 
to embrace these princioles in our lives, 
and consequently resolve to sacrifice 
self and serve our fellow-men. This re- 
presents an aggressive spirit. With 
these tvo states of being — passivity 
and activity — acting in harmony, life 
becomesi ideal. 

After all it is true that New Year 
furnishes the best opportunity for cer- 
tain resolutions. It is a fitting time to 
look over the past year and see what 
has been done and what remains un- 
done in our communities. It is a fitting 
time to review onr own lives and see 
what we have gained and what we have 
lost in our spiritual growth. So, then, 
let us this another New Year's Day, 
look over our past lives, and resolve to 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



strive for more holiness in ourselves, 
and for the upbuilding of Zion. God 
will be pleased with such a resolution 
and, if we have prayerfully purposed 
this in our hearts, he will give us 
grace sufficient to stand firm when 
storms of opposition and the blasting 
heat of temptation assail us. 

Will You do the Same ? 

We are indeed very glad to receive 
the following communication from 
Dr. O. S, Highbarger of Hagerstown, 
Maryland. 

"Our College Times" for December 
to hand, and I have placed the same 
on my reception room table, where it 
can be read by any one who calls. 

Hoping it may do you much good, 
I am, Yours respectfully. 

Dr. O. S. Highbarger. 



We believe some more of our worthy 
friends and patrons are in a position 
to do this thing. There is no question 
as to whether this will do us any good 
or not. It shows us that at least one 
person is interested in our college. 
We also believe that more people will 
be reached by thus placing our litera- 
ture before the public. We know 
that practically everybody believes 
in the profitableness of advertising. 
Consequently, we make the following 
proposition to all professional men. 

W,e will send you the paper free 
for one year, if you promise to keep 
the current issue of the paper on your 
office, or reception room table, so that 
it may always be before your callers. 



^@^j/x^r^ 




s 



We express our New Year's wish to 
you through the words of A. Edwin 
Keigwi, ex-President of Ursinus Col- 
lege : 

^'A year of health but don't abuse it; 

Sufficient wealth and grace to use it ; 
A host of friends who are kind and 
true; 
A heart to will and a hand to do ; 
Not one regret when a day is done ; 
Eternal rest when the race is run ; 
Help from above your strength to- 
renew; 

This is our New Year's wish for you." 
The long looked for and joyously an- 
ticipated holiday is over ; our feasting 
is at an end and College meals again 
stare us in the face ; our Christmas tid- 
ings of love and cheer are carried to 
others ; and our gifts are given, but let 
us, with T. L. Cuyler, remember that : 
""A new year is upon us, with new 
duties, new conflicts, new trials, and 
■new opportunities. Start on the jour- 
ney with Jesus — to walk with Him, to 
work for Him, and to win through 
Him. A happy year will it be to those 
who, through every path of trial, or up 
every hill of difficulty, or over every 
sunny height, march on in ' closet fel- 
lowship with Jesus and who will deter- 



C 



N 















t 



L 




mine that, come what may, they iiave 
Christ every day." 

Although Jack Frost and the cold 
winds of December are not idle, yet we 
have had ideal weather on College Hill 
thus far for a student's life. 

On December 6 the "Second Year 
German Class" lost their second game 
to the "Lancaster County German" 
team by a score of 25 to 30. This 
makes the score in games 2 to i in 
favor of the "Lancaster County Ger- 
man" team in the seven game series 
that will be played. 
S. Y. German L. C. German 

Diehm centre Geyer 

Kreider guard Coble 

Rose guard Hershey 

Garber forward Brandt 

Herr forward Kulp 

On December 9 a large and spell- 
bound audience heard Col. Bain give 
his famous lecture on "The New Wo- 
man and the Old Man." It was one of 
the best lectures ever given at Eliza- 
bethtown College and carried a mes- 
sage of inspiration and help to every 
one. 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Our next lecture in the College 
Course will be given by Byron C. Piatt, 
who last year gave us an inspiring lec- 
ture on "American Morals." He will 
again address an Elizabethtown Col- 
lege audience on January 21, 1913. His 
subject will be "The New Era." 

A few days ago a little spotted dog 
came into Room P during the "Second 
Year German" period. He paced the 
range of the room with the air of one 
who had come on a tour of inspection. 
The methods employed in the recita- 
tion met his approval ; he regarded 
them as pedagogical. Nothing oc- 
curred to disturb his serenity until a 
long bench, near one end of which he 
was standing and against the other end 
of which a weary German scribe wa=, 
leaning, slipped a few inches toward 
our genial visitor. This got him 
guessing at once. With his eye rnet- 
ed upon the bottom of the bench 
which skidded, and with a look exactly 
like the little cur that hears his m? tier's 
voice in the Victor phonograph, he sud- 
denly made his exit llirotu>h the tran- 
som and has not been >.-<.';- since. 

A series of four lec*:.iics on Social 
Ethics was given by Prof. J. M. Cole- 
man in the College Chapel on Decem- 
ber 3,. 4 and 5, His subjects were 
"The State," "The State and Govern- 
ment," "The Church and Government," 
and "The State and God." Although 
philosophical in character yet they 
were given so as to carry a message to 
all. They were greatly appreciated by 
the students and friends of the College. 

Dr. Reber in Philosophy of Educa- 
tion : "What is the are of the surface 
of the brain?" 

Miss S : "One square centimeter." 

Mr. Kulp is continuing to make mis- 



takes in the dining room like the fol-- 
lowing: "Miss Cereal, please pass the 
Wenger." On correcting his mistake 
Miss W. promptly passed the syrup. 

On December 10 the unexpected 
again happened when we received an 
excellent chicken dinner in the College 
dining room. We hope the manage- 
ment will keep uo the good work. 
Anybody desiring information how ta 
avoid carving a chicken ask Mr. Ging- 
rich. 

A number of the students heard ex- 
Governor Glenn give a lecture in Mar- 
ket House Hall on the evening of De- 
cember 3. 

We are very anxious concerning the 
action that Prof. Harley will take on 
the question asked him by Miss Stauf- 
fer who has continually been making 
use of the last leap year. The question 
he is confronting is : "Are you going to, 
pay your fine or plead your case?" 

The winter term opened on Decem- 
ber 2, with the return of all the old 
students, except one, and a large num- 
ber of new ones. All work seems to 
be progressing harmoniously. The 
Bible and Commercial Departments are 
growing considerably. 

Miss Price, a former student from 
Montgomery county, is with us again. 

Horace Reber has canvassed the Col- 
lege taking orders for toilet necessities. 
The can of cold cream purchased by 
Mr. Waltz bears the following explana- 
tion : "This preparation is now be- 
coming so generally used by ladies who 
desire a beautiful complexion that it 
has come to be considered an everyday 
toilet necessity." 

George Neff spent Sunday .November 
24, at the home of Mr. Geyer. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



Prof. Harley and Mr. Shelly chal- 
lenged the winner of the tennis tourna- 
ment. 

In History of Education Miss Sheaf- 
fer while giving' the biography of Cath- 
erine, Beecher stated: "In the year 1832 
she started a private cemetery at Cin- 
cinnati." On investigating it was found 
to be a private seminary. 

Prof. Schlosser will hold a series of 
meetings lasting two weeks at East 
Berlin, x-\dams County. 

Mr. C. to Mr. Z. "Will you go along 
to the lecture?" 

Mr. Z. "If you pay my way in for 
-nothing, I'll go along." 

On the evening of December 7, 
College Hill saw its best ".Social" for 
mi-^ year. It was held in Mnvc 1Th,;1 
and the adjoining rooms. There were 
two leading features of the evening, a 
memory test open to all and a sewing 
contest open to gentlemen only. The 
latter contest proved interesting as well 
as a surprise to some of the "modistes" 
who looked on with amazement. The 
first contest was won by Prof. Schlos- 
ser; the second by J. D. Reber. 

Question: Why does Miss Stauffer 
say that she soon expens to use 
aluminum ware? 

Miss Meyer to Mr. Zook : "Please 
serve that dessert. That will be good 
preliminary practice if you want to be 
a civil engineer." 

Prof.: "What are general words?" 
■"General words are words that include 
a class of objects and mean just the 
■opposite from their right meaning." 

Since the lecture by Col. Bain we are 
able to account more fully for Mr. 



Kreider's weekly disappearance from 
the College. 

Prof, in Rhetoric class: "Name some 
violations of good usage." Student in 
examination : "Some violations are 
Barbianism, Solacisms, Hypheoneous 
and Cocafihuis word, and hagnetted 
expressions." Spelling, however, is 
taught at Elizabethtown College. 

Prof.: "Explain the sentence in Mil- 
ton's poem, II Penseroso, 'I heard the 
far off curfew sound.' " 

MissB. : "I think that curfew is a 
kind of bird." 

Prof. : "State the advantage of com- 
pound sentences over simple sen- 
tences." 

Student : "Compound sentences are 
good to bring out a double meaning. 
But two simple sentences are the best 
to reach everybody interested. 

K. L. S. News 

The Keystone Literary Society met 
in regular session on November 
15, 1912. The first feature was the 
inauguration of the members who had 
been elected the previous week. 

The following program was then ren- 
dered. 
Piano Duet — Carrie Dennis and 

Delia Shenk. 
Select Reading — "Mark Twain's 

Watch" — Sarah Replogle. 
Recitation— "The Spoild Statue- 
Anna Schwenk. 
Vocal Solo— "Sunlight Land" 

Delia Shank. 
Debate — Resolved, That the American 

Public School system of today is a 

failure. 
Debated affirmatively by Misses Maud 

Hertzler and IMary Scheafifer. Neg- 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



atively by Miss Rebecca Scheaffer 
and Mr. Harry Nye. The judges 
decided in favor of the negative. 

Vocal Solo— "De Coppa Moon." 

C. L Martin 

Echo — Sarah Moyer 

On November 22. the Society met 
in Executive Session. Two students 
made application to become members 
of the Society. A Lancaster County 
program was then rendered. 

On December 6. the Society met in 
literary session and the following pro- 
gram was rendered : 
Music— "Gypsy Love Song" 

C. L. Martin 
Essay — "Good will at Yuletide" 

Ada Douty 
Recitation— "Annie's and Willie's 

Prayer" — Elizabeth Miller. 
Debate— Resolved, That the Christmas 
vacation is more profitable to the 
student than the Summer vacation. 

The judges decided in favor of the 

negative. The affirmative speakers 

were Miss Lillian Becker and Mr. 

Hiram Eberly ; the negative speakers 

Miss Edna Wenger and Mr. R. C. 

Long. 
Music — "O Tannen Baum," German 

Quartet 
Select Reading — "The Convict's 
Christmas Eve" — Naomi Longenecker 
Literary Echo — Sarah Moyer. 

Homerian News. 

Although the members of this so- 
ciety are rather few, yet constant pro- 
gress is being made. The foundation 
of this organization is about laid. Our 
new Constitution now appears in book- 
let form. Considerable time was spent 
in the making of these articles and 
amendments, but we are convinced 



that every good thing takes time. A 
small bulletin board for posting pro- 
grams and ottier news is one of the 
recently purchased articles of our so- 
ciety. On the evening of December 13, 
the following public program was 
rendered : 

Prayer, Chaplain. 

Vocal Solo — "A Cry Goes up in 

Rhama." Katherine Miller. 

Reading — "Sacrifice of Abraham," 

Lydia Staufifer. 
Debate— Resolved. That Browning 

was a greater poet than Tennyson. 

Affirmative, . Ruth C. Stayer. 

Negative, Nora L. Reber. 

Music — "Swanee River," 

Female Quartet 
Speaker's Address — "The Blessing in 

the Guise of Adversity, "L. W. Leiter 
Critic's Remarks, J. S. Harley. 



The Elizabcthtown College Bible Term 

The Thirteenth Annual Session of 
Bible study is near at hand. It opens 
January 15 at nine o'clock a. m., and 
closes January 24 with a sermon. We 
have been fortunate indeed in securing 
some of the best talent in the Brethren 
Church for this coming Bible Term.. 
The instructors this year will be char- 
acterized by consecrated scholarship- 
and varied experience of Christian ser- 
vice extending through many years. 
Every minister, Sunday School officer 
and teacher and every one interested 
in the extension of the cause of Christ 
should endeavor to attend the full 
term. 

Boarding and lodging for the ten 
days will be five dollars. For less than 
the full term sixty cents a day will be 
charged. No charge is made for tui- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



tion. However, to defray the expenses 
of the special teachers, a special con- 
tribution is asked of all those who at- 
tend this Bible Term. Meal tickets at 
the College dining room, twenty 
cents. Lodging per single night, fif- 
teen cents. 

The accommodations for Bible Term 
students at the College buildings are 
very limited this year. However, those 
who apply first will receive the first op- 
portunity to occupy what room we 
do have. Be sure to write us that you 
are coming, even though you are not 
sure that you can be accommodated in 
the buildings. State when you are 
coming and how long you expect to 
stay and we will be glad to arrange for 
your lodging either at the college or in 
town. Accounts are to be settled vv^ith 
Professor H. K. Ober, Treasurer. On 
arriving at the depot, take Pierce's 
hack for the college. Bring your 
Brethren Hymnal and Bible. Towl, 
soap, and a woolen blanket will be 
necessary in case you secure lodging 
at the college building. 

For further information address D. 
C. Reber. 

The daily program follows : 

Morning. 

8-9 — Library work or Study. 

9.00— Chapel Exercises. 

9.20 — Lesson in Homiletics, 

J. G. Royer. 
10.00 — I Corinthians, S. H. Hertzler. 
10.40 — I Peter, J. Kurtz Miller. 

11.20 — Psalms, Lydia Staufifer. 

Afternoon. 

1.40 — Prayer, Jesse Ziegler. 

— The Great Teacher, J. G. Royer. 

2.20— n Peter, J. Kurtz Miller. 



3.00— S. S. Pedagogy, H. K. Ober. 

— Missions, W. B. Stover. 

3.40— Sacred Music, Katherine Miller. 

Evening. 
6.45 — Song Service, Katherine Miller. 
7.00 — Sermons, J. G. Royer and W^ 
B. Stover. 
Sermons by J. G. Royer. 
Jan. 15. — Mission of the Bible. 
Jan. 16 — Consecration. 
Jan. 17 — Law of Sacrifice. 
Jan. 18 — Privileges, of the Christian. 
Jan. 19— Am I Living up to my Op- 
portunities? 

Educational Program. 

2 p. m., Saturday, January 18, 1913. 
Invocation — Eld. Jesse Ziegler. 
Music. 
Address — "Education as I see it." J. 

G. Royer. 
Recitation — "The Boy with the Lunch" 

Lydia Staufifer 
Music. 
Address— "The Heart of the Teacher." 

George Leslie Omwake, Pres. of 

LTrsinus College, Collegeville, Pa. 
Ofifering. 
Music. 



Temperance Program. 
Jan. 19. 10.30 a. m., College Chapel. 
Moderator — Prof. J. G. Myer. 
Devotional Exercises. 
Song. 
Recitation — "Tommy," 

Naomi Longenecker 

Song. 

Special Temperance Address, 

Arthur J. Culler, Phila. 
Ofifering. 
Song — "A Saloonless Nation in 1920." 




Mr. Andrew Hollinger, 'lo, who is 
now engaged in musical work in Lan- 
caster, spent Monday, December 9, 
on College Hill. He tried to interest 
the young men in school in the 
Aluminum project, for the coming 
summer. He remained for the evening 
lecture by Col. Geo. W. Bain. 

Miss Elma Brandt, '11, was also 
present on the same evening, and en- 
joyed hearing the "Silver Tongued 
Orator" deliver a most excellent lec- 
ture. 

Miss Elizabeth Weaver, 08, was 
united in marriage to Mr. Simon Lan- 
dis by Rev. S. S. Daugherty on Thanks- 
giving Day. Surely we extend to this 
couple our very best wishes for a hap- 
py and prosperous life. 

L. W. Leiter, '10, spent Thanks- 
giving vacation somewhere away from 
the College. We are not sure, but it 
is supposed that he was continuing his 
practice of "ma"— "mi" — of which two 
tones he is very fond. 

It may be interesting to our Alumni 
to know what has become of the class 
of 1912 since their graduation. Four 
of them are engaged in one of the 
noblest professions ; viz., teaching. 



Mamie B. Keller, a graduate in the 
Pedagogical Course, has charge of a 
school near Dover, York County, Pa. 

M. Irene Sheetz, who finished the 
English Scientific Course, is teaching 
in Rapho Township and expects to re- 
turn to her Alma Mater in the spring 
to complete the work in Pedagogy. 

W. F. Christman, after finishing the 
College Preparatory course, accepted 
a position as teacher at Dauphin, near 
Harrisburg. He expects to continue 
his education in a few years. 

Walter F. Eshelman, also a College 
Preparatory student, is teaching near 
Elizabethtown. We expect to see him 
return for the Spring Term. 

Five of the class have returned for 
further work, H. H. Nye, who is teach- 
ing History and Latin and pursuing 
the College course ; Gertrude Miller, 
who is taking Bible work in connec- 
tion with her work as private secretary 
to the President, D. C. Reber; Orville 
Z. Becker and C. L. Martin, who are 
pursuing the Pedagogical Course; 
Wm. K. Kulp, who has enrolled for 
further Bible work. 

Orpha L. Harshberger is staying at 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



home this winter with her parents but 
we hope to have her back again in the 
near future. 

Gertrude Keller has remained in 
Elizabethtown where she is a stenog- 
rapher, and general assistant to Prof. 
H. K. Ober. 

Ava R. Witmer, has accepted a posi- 
tion as Bookkeeper for the Hershey 
Creamery Company of Elizabethtown. 

Fred. L. Burgess is clerking in a 
store at Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Isaac O. Foreman has been employed 
at the Martin and Hieagy establishment 
of this town^ since his graduation. 

Paul M. Landis is employed in 
Philadelphia, but we are not able to 
give full particulars as to the place 
nor the work. 



R. Condry Long is employed as time- 
keeper at the Kreider Shoe Factory of 
Elizabethtown. 

Russel W. Shank is at present work- 
ing at the stone quarries near Cone- 
wago but ejcpects to enter a business 
school before very long. 

All the members of this class are 
worthily employed and many of them 
are contemplating entering school 
again. Most of these, if not all, joined 
the Alumni Association before leaving 
last June. Every graduate of the 
school, if he is loyal, faithful, and in- 
terested in the welfare of his Alma 
Mater should join the Association, for 
the future hope of any 'school lies in 
the graduates it sends forth. 




Of the many great impediments to 
progress, "Borrowed Bosh," as one 
paper terms its borrowed things, is 
one of the greatest. If we were to 
discuss this theme in all its phases 
as portrayed in many avenues of life, 
we should find no end. We shall 
treat it only as it concerns the publica- 
tion of school papers. 

In the first place, readers care little 
for "second-hand" things. Every one 
admires work new from its maker, 
fresh from the mind. The minute a 
poet begins to weave the theme and 
the style of another into his own pro- 
ductions, his genius is questioned. 
Then, too, borrowing causes no de- 
velopment on the part of the one who 
■engages in it. To our mind a school 
paper is published for two reasons : 
first, to acquaint the friends of an in- 
stitution with the workings of the 
school ; secondly, to afford an oppor- 
tunity for the development of the tal- 
ent of the student body. Now, then, 
borrow all the "Bosh" you please ; de- 
velopment you can never borrow. 

The College Folio does not give us 
much variety. However, what it does 
give, is original—not "Borrowed Bosh." 



The writer of "Thanksgiving for Re- 
membrance" is to be congratulated. 

Conwayan, we like your appearance. 
Your work is well arranged and neatly 
done. To perfect yourself you ought 
to give us some stories, orations, or es- 
says. 

The editors of the Optimist are not 
afraid to be original and to pay the 
price of efficiency. 

This month th.e Tech Tatler places 
itself among our best high school and 
preparatory school papers. 

The Red and Black believes in being 
short. It's work is well arranged. 

We are glad to greet The Daleville 
Leader, Read "Social Responsi- 
bility" ; you will enjoy it. 

In appearance and arrangement the 
Bulletin is as neat as any paper we 
have thus far noticed. 

For model literary work see the 
Collegian. "The Spirit of Reform" 
is treated in a pleasing manner. 

If we may judge by the outstart of 
the exchange editor. The Philomathean 
Monthly will give us something worth 
while. In the November number we 



J 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



find an article written by Mary Agnes 
Shipman, entitled "The First Thanks- 
giving." This article is linstructive, 
and well written. Your pages find 
little room for trash. 

Purple and Wihite, a very nice Glee 
Club you have ! We like your ap- 
pearance and balance. Your cuts are 
significant. Your departments are 
equally well emphasized. Beware of 
the "would-be-wit" and "Borrowed 
Bosh" maladies! 



To all we wish a very successful 
and happy New Year. We know that 
the happier we are in general, if not at 
the expense of others,— the more 
chance there will be for us" to be happy; 
and we have learned that to be happy 
ourselves we must surely make others 
happy. The one who is always 
making some one else unhappy is 
usually very unhappy himself. 



Fresh and Smoked Meats 

S. M. REIMSEL 

S. Market St. 0pp. Exchange Bank 



I 



Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. None 
Better, Ferw as Good. 

D. H. BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTOW^N 



The baker who knows how. Phone or drop a postal 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALE 

Centre Square 



CENTRAL MEAT 



MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



H. H. GOOD 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



UP TO DATE 



Shaving and Hair Cutting 



The Pratt 
Teachers' Agency 

70 Fifth Avenne 
Ne-w York 



Receives calls at all seasons for colletre 
and normal graduates, specialists and 
other teachers in coilesjes, public and 
private schools in all parts of the coun- 
try. 

Advises parents about schools. 

■WM. O. PRATT, Manager 



Plain Suits, Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats. 

GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange Sts., Lancaster, Pa. 



R. H. SHISSLER. 



Elizabethtown Dental 
Parlors 

Office Closed Thursday 
and Friday 

S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 

Ctias. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



26 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



liHIIIIBIIIIIBII 



iiiiiiniiiiBiimiiiiniiinimiii:H!iiW''iBiiiiq 

P College Jewelry of the Better Sort g 

I G. Wm.^ISNER | 

1 Manufacturing | 

I Jeweler I 

= Class Pins and Rings Prize Cnps 9 

= Fraternity Jew^elry Medals g 

M 120 East Chestnut Street. g 

m LA^CASTER, PA. | 

SiiiiiraiiiESiiiiiiiiiii^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiisiiiiiraiiiiBiiiiiDtiiiiniiiiniiiiwiiBii' 



4* 
* 



I Pcatilig and 



* 
* 

40 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. J 



i'*I*4>*i>4'4*4'4>4>4*4>4'4*4'4'4"!"!"!'4"I>4"i"i'4^'!>'i"i"^ 

^ F. T. Muth H. M. Muth * 

I MUTH BROS. I 
i * 

% Dealers in J 

LUMBERol 

Also all kinds of building material ^ 

and mill work, Slate and Cement, ||| 

Wheeler Screens, Fertilizer, Patent || 

Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board, etc. T 

COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. 2 

We also aim to give you a square ^ 

4° 

deal that will merit your trade and ^ 

4> 

friendship. 4. 



X ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. f 



DENTIST 

GEO. R. KERSEY 

Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



WE DO IT RIGHT 

Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES ^ SON 



F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 

Horseshoeing a Specialty. 

N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 

J. GROFF & SONS 

Meet Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



,f-^ 



i^arry 



mide Uown ^"^ 



I ea, m any poa 



— ■ if you wan^ to. 
tion, any pocket. 

Boys: carry the Parker Jack Kmfe 
VcTi in ycur trousers pocket along 
v.-i;h your keys. 

Girls: carry it in the pocket of 
yc>ur white blouse. 

Flay foolball wiLh it, — backetboll, 
t -n-b, hockey. It's on the job the 
minute you want to wr';e, without 
1 -avir.g a pinhead spot of ink any- 
where it has been carried. 

Write? Just ini g.iie a pen of 
c' >ss that melts to ink as ycu sLd^ it 
across paperl That's the way it writ "s 

Price $2.50 up. Get one on tr 1 
Take it back any tine wii.jn 10 
djys if you're not t;>.kled to death 
with it. We authorize dealer to re- 
fund. If your dealer doccn't cary 
Parkers, write us for catalog loduy 

PARKER PEN COMPANY 
Mill SL, Janesvi le. Wis. 




Jack Kniife Safety 



For sale at the Bookroom. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 27 



1900 ' 1912 

IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 

SEVEN REASONS : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location, 
Ideal Surroundings. 
■ Growing Attendance. 

Christian Home. 
Modern Etfuipment. 

For further particulars, address 

Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN PA. 



28 



Our Advertisers are Wdrthiy of Your Patronage. 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-Made Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 



North East Corner Centre Square, 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



JACOts nSHER 
Watchmaker & Jei^eler 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 

With you for 31 years. Tliat's All 



lAI 



WOOD, GRAIN FEED FLOUR. 



Telephone 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



Bell and Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 



46 E. King St., 



Lancaster, Pa. 



CHOICE I^EATS 

A. K. Young 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



W. R. Ashenfelter I 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied with 
Fancy Cakes at short notice. 



S S. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
"Will convince. Work g:uaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown. Pa. 



•' ■ ■ 

Ind. Phone Hours 8 to 


6 


DR. JEROME G. HESS 


§m 


1 


DENTIST 


^M 




Hertzler Bldg. 
Elizabethtown Pa. 

^>. , — 


m 





Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 

Ctoice Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees, Fresh Country Bntter and Eggs 

Bell Phone 



Elizabethtown, Penna 



We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 



Y. M. C. A. Bldg., 



Lancaster, Pa. 



H. H. BRAND! t 



Dealer in 

ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



♦ 

t 

^ Elizabothtown, 
»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦»< 



I 



Penna. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



THE ''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabcthtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
Shipped every Wednesday 



EMZABETHTOWN, 



PBNNA. 



^ 



J 



Sporting Goods 



Post Cards 



Agent for all periodicals. 

Pocket cutlery, toys, novelties, etc. 

Fine confections. 

H. K. Dorsheimer 

Bell 'Phone 38-3 
On the Square, Elizabethtown Pa. 



School Supplies 



Stationery 



John A. Fisher 



BARBER 



Centre Square, 



£lizabethto-ivn, Pa. 



J COLUMBIAN AND RED CROSS 

I Heaters and Ranges 

X The Finest Lines Made 



X Jos. H. Rider & Son 

J ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



F 



I 

T 

y 

R 

E 




D. B, KLmE 

CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



GEO. A. FISHER 

HARDWARE 

Automobiles 
Phonographs and 
Records 
F. P. GAS PLANTS 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades of 

FLOUR AND FEED 

Highest Cash Prices paid for grain, 
hay and straw 



♦ ELIZABETHTOWN, 
♦♦ ♦ »♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦#♦♦♦< 



PENNA. 



30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of i^our Patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 



The Bee Hive Store 



South Market and Bainbridge Streets, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Dry Goods,Notions, Shoes, Carpets, Draperies and an Up-to-Date 
Gent's and Ladies' Furnishings 

''SOMETHING NEW EVERY DAY" 



line of 




D. C. 

Coa 



The Duplex 

Recommends Literary 
and Commercial teachers 
Secretaries and Account- 
ants. Schools for sale. 
Circurlars free. Write 
for further information. 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Feed, 
Straw 



Grain, Flour, 
Seeds, Hay, 
and Fertilizer. 



Bell & Ind. Phones 



Rheems, 



Pa. 



^ A farmer once to a certain age ^ 

$ ;Tn the Lunch Room Business did en- ^ 
^ gage. 

T'was Nissley. 
Thousands of people now are fed, 
Pure, delicious, quick. Enough said. 



^ 



TRY NISSLEY 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. 



Lunches 



Telephones 



D. W. MIESSE 

Baker and Confectioner 

123 N. Queen St. 

LANCASTER, PA. 



Ice Cream 



Water Ice 






Ursinus College 

COLLEGEVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 
(24 miles from Philadelphia.) 

Organized and administered under the Group Sys- 
tem of Instruction, providing both liberal culture and 
special preparation for the various vocations, an 
arrangement presenting exceptional advantages for 
efficiency and economy All groups open to women 
as well as men Write for special bulletin and 
descriptive pamphlet. 

A. Edwin Keigwin D.D., President. 
Geo. Leslie Omwake, Pd.D., Vice-Pres. 



* 

* 

* 
* 

* 



A ............ ............................ 



I Spalding Sporting Goods I 



Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, 
Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic 
Shoes. Kodaks .and Cameras, de- 
veloping and finishing. 

H. B. H E R R 
30-32 West King Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 



♦ 

♦ 
♦ 

X 

♦ 
♦ 



iJini 



IF ITS MUSIC OR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, WE HAVE IT! 



IkirR Johnson & Co. 



MUSIC HALL I 

I 

16-18 West King Street, LANCASTER, PA. j 

I 

llllllliBiifllBiiitnillHIIiiinilllHinniianlllBIIIBiyilBIHIiniliHlIMiH!^^ 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



31 



ail Orders Solicited for I 
Books and Bibles 

I THE BOOK STORE 

I 

I C. N. FALKENSTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. ^ 



/T 



IpaiiitinQ nnb paper 
f3an0(ng 

AMOS B. DRACE 



£nd. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 

Catalogues a Specialty 

311 W. Grant St., LANCASTER, PA. 



S. G. GRAYBILL 



=^ 



c 



OLLEGE 




AIRY 



^ 



Fresh milk and cream daily. All milk 

tested for children; free from tuberculosis 

HOTELS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED 



J 



is the cry of man and horse. The 
horse says "It pulls so easy" and the 
man says "It rides so nice and lasts 
so long." So come my neighbor, get 
yourself such an outfit and be pleased 
yet more than that. 

REBER WAGON WORKS 
Centreport, Pa. 



TAKE YOURj 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morning. 
Returns Wednesday and Friday afternoon. 

CALL AT 
RALPH GROSS SHAVING PARLOR 
Conducted on sanitary principles. 

Massaging a Specialty. 
Agency of First-Class Laundry. 
EMZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 






O. iV. HEISEY 



5 Provisions, Groceries, ca. Choice Candies ^ 



:^ HEISEY BUTLDING 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. ^ 



^(f\^fy(fMtMf\(fy(f\^f>(fMf\(f\(f!^(f\(f>(f!i(f>^f>(f>(fy(f\(fyff\(^(fy(fyff\ 



32 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Elizabettifoi/vn Exchange 

Bank 



Transacts a general banking business, pays in- 
terest on time deposits, solicits your patronage 



OFFICERS 



A. G. HEISEY. Pres. 



ALLEN A. COBLE. Vice Pres 



J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 



DIRECTORS 



A. G. Heisey Jos. G. Heisey B. H. Greider, H. J. Gisb 

Allen A. Coble Dr. H. K. Blough Henry E. Landis J. H. Buch 

Dr. A. M. Kalbach Geo. D. Boggs E. E. Hernly 



V. N. Kraybilll 

Both 'Phones W 

Rheexus, - Penn'a t 

Dealer in it 



Groceries, Dry Goods, Notions, * 
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers % 



Hardware, Paints, Oils, Turpen- 
tine and Glass 



^ Oilcloth, Linoleums, Matting, Win- 
dow Shades and Strips 



^ 



Soliciting a Share of Your Business ^ 



kiiaiiiiiaiiiiniiiiiniiiiHiiiiiBiiiiiBiiiiiHiiiiwiiinii 



iniiiiHiiiiini 



Warner's 

Corsets 

are the only corsets that are en- 
dorsed so fully and strongly to us. 

Guaranteed to shape fashion- 
ably, to fit comfortably, and not 
to rust, break or tear. 

You connot say any more In 
favor of a corset excepting to give 
its price — 

$1.00 to $2.00 Per Pair 

If we could say just the things 
that we say about Warner's Rust- 
Proof Corsets, it would make 
any corset worth while ; but 
WARNER'S are the only corsets 
we can make this absolute state- 
ment regarding. 

Hunfzberger-Winters Co. 

ELIZABETHTOIVN, PA. 



iiinii 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



"It's not what we say we do; 
It's what we do." 

How often have you read the promises of men? 

How often have you paid the penalty afterwards? 

We often question the advisability of telling about 
the clothes we sell, for talk is cheap. However, there is 
only one way to interest the man who doesn't know^ us 
and that is to advertise. So, we are forced to use this 
method of getting in touch with you. 

This advertisement is not going to say a single word 
about our clothes. Its only object is to invite you to 
visit our shop. When you arrive here we'll show you. 

Can we hope to see you soon? 

"FOLLOW THE ARROW" TO 

S. M. MYERS & CO. 

CLOTHIERS — FURNISHERS — HATTERS 
12 East King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Hertzler's Department Store 




Your needs supplied at satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, Groceries, Ready-to-Wear Clothing tor Men 
and Women of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oilcloth 
Shoes, Etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-Measure 



CLOTHING 



International Tailoring Co., New York. 
American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chicago. 
Up-to-Date Sarmples on Hand. 



Black Cat 
Hosiery 



HERTZLER BROS. & CO 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier 



U. S. DEPOSITORY 



Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital Surplus and Profits $157,000.00 



General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid on special 
deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 





DIRECTORS 




W. S. Smith 


Elmer W. Strickler 


Peter N. Rutt 


F. W. GrofC 


J. S. Risser 


B. Lt. Geyer 


B. C. Ginder 


Amos G. Coble 


B. E. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



Carl Schlotzhauer 

The Students Gfficial 
Photographer 




^ 



' 



I 

^ 



' 



I 



/2f 



Don't have your Pho- 
tos taken anywhere else 
or you will regret it. 

You are Invited to vis- 
it our studio and notice 
the 1912 Photography, 
something new and differ- 
ent than you have ever 
seen before. 



^ 



I 



' 



SPECIAL RATE TO STUDENTS 

163 N. Queen St. 

OPPOSITE HOTEL WHEATLAND 



hmm^mnmitt0mmmmmmmm 



We Are Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made to Order 






Plain 
Clothing 

In This Country 



> 

> Furnishing 



When in Lancaster it will pay 
you to visit ours, the - only 
Clothing Store in that city that 
has One Price to All and gives 
discounts to none. See us for 

MEN'S READY MADE AND 
MADE TO ORDER 

Clothing 

AND 



YOUTH'S AND BOYS' 
CLOTHING 




Hirsh & Bro. 



^ Since 1854 at 

^ Centre Square, Next to City Hall 

J LANCASTER, .PA. 




Q^ViT£/v^ 




CZAR ALEXANDER'S CONSOLATION 5 

HOW JOHN SUCCEEDED 6 

THE HEROINE, JULIET 8 

RESOLUTIONS OF SYMPATHY 9 

TAKE NOTICE 9 

BIBLE TERM IMPRESSIONS lo 

^ SERMONS 0UTLINJ:S 12-14 

EDITORIALS I5 

COME FOR THE SPRING TERM 16 

SCHOOL NOTES 17-2o 

KEYSTONE L. S 20 

HOMERIAN L. S 20 

THE SPRING TERM 21-22 

ALUMNI 2'3 

EXCHANGES 24 



ffiur fflnll^g? Stm^a 



Vol. X ELizABiffTHTowN, Pa., Fbbbuaey, 1918 No. 5 



Czar Alexander's Consolation. 



In his palace on the Neva, 'mid the silken draperies lying, 

Spoke the Czar of all the Russia's to a vassal waiting near, 
*'Call the lowly John of Cronstadt, bid him haste, for I am dying, 

And I long once more to listen to his loving word of cheer." 
Why did not the monarch summon royal peers exalted greatly. 

Or his marshals with their regiments, his princes stout and hale ? 
Where was now his throne's magnificence with pomp and pageant stately? 

Ah, the Czar had reached the hour when all these things can not avail. 

For us too awaits a moment- when, though blest with wealth and station, 

We shall look in vain for solace to our chattels, bonds, and lands ; 
When the crown of genius rare which fills the soul with admiration 

Fades to nothingness with every crumbling work of human hands. 
Then at last, constrained to face the unrelenting King of Terrors, 

We shall crave sustaining grace and yearn for those who love the Son ; 
As the Czar for mercy pleading and repenting of his errors 

Banished from his couch his courtiers to commune with saintly John. 

In the years of youth and hope should glow the ardent pure desire 

In the path of radiant truth to walk and think of others' need; 
In our manhood and our strength should burn the all-consuming fire' 

Of religion's holy zeal that prompts to self-denying deed; 
Then no fears can us assail as we approach the dreaded portal, 

While we cherish in our breasts the promise of his sacred Word, 
Promise of the life that now is and anon the life immortal 

When the realms of earth shall merge into the Kingdom of our Lord. 

— Nescis. 



How John Succeeded. 



H. H. Nye 

(Continued from January Number) 



John went to his new home with a 
light heart for he always admired his 
uncle, who was of a more kindly dispo- 
sition than his father. He enjoyed his 
jovial spirit as they worked together in 
the fields, for he was always full of life 
and fun and yet took everything calm- 
ly when things went wrong. And when 
he came to the house he loved to hear 
the musical voice and the touching 
greetings of his dear old aunt Alary. 

Here John spent three short years of 
his life and instead of being dis- 
couraged in going to school he was 
greatly encouraged by his uncle and 
aunt. At the end of the three years 
his uncle advised him to spend a year 
in the normal school to prepare for 
teaching. John was delighted with the 
thought but he said : 

"I have no money to go, Uucle Jerry, 
and more than that, my father has al- 
ways opposed higher education and 
I'm sure he would not allow me to go." 

"But John," added Mr. Halk, "we'll 
have an interview with him and if he 
does not give you money to go, I shall 
be only too glad to help you." 

"Very well," continued John, "school 
will soon open and we'll go over tomor- 
row evening and see him about this 
important matter. Will you take me, 
uncle?" 

"Yes, gladly," added he, well pleased 
with the interest John manifested. 

The appointed time came when they 
should go to meet his father. They 



set out early in the evening and as they 
rode along they discussed freely the 
plans they had considered. When 
they came to John's home, John found 
his father and mother very tired with 
the hard toil of the day and they were 
soon ready to retire. 

Mr. Sherman saw tiiem approaching 
and looked with amazement at them, 
wondering what it might all mean. 
Soon John and uncle Jerry had come up 
to the house and John greeted his par- 
ents with a fond "Good evening" and 
a pleasant smile. 

"What's de meanin' of dis, John?" 
inquired his father earnestly. 

"O we came on a little matter of 
business," replied John thoughtfully. 

Upon that they proceeded to speak 
about their regular duties and tasks of 
the day. They had spoken about half 
an hour when John opened the normal 
school question. 

"Uucle and I would like very much 
if you would let me go to the normal 
school this year," began John slowly. 
"That is why we have come this even- 
ing. What do you think about it, 
father?" 

"What a foolish question you're ask- 
in', John, you know dat I nebber had 
any time for dose high-headed, con- 
ceity normal school fellers walkin' 
aroun' here and not workin' anythaing. 
An' now you come and wan' 'o be a 
feller of dat kind. Why I nebber 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



soug-ht any of my children should 
waste dar time in dat sort er bisness," 
gruffly returned the old farmer. 

"Well Abe, John is seventeen now 
and it's about time, I think, that he 
should go to school, for next year he'll 
be old enough to teach if he succeeds 
in his work, a thing which I believe he 
will be able to do," interrupted Mr. 
Halk. 

"Hum, hum, so it was you wot put 
dis foolishness in John's hed. I'm 
sure I never gave him a bit o' sich fool- 
ish advice. It's shust dis, John. I 
don' gif you no money for't, for it runs 
up pooty high at dem normal schools 
in a year, I underschtand, an' I sink it 
is all bosh in de end," continued Mr. 
Sherman. 

"Well, Abe. if I help John in this 
work, will you have any objections?" 
inquired Mr. Halk. 

"Well, if you want to gif him de 
money and look after his well-bein' 
while at de school, why I guess — . 
But, Jerry, don't forget dat I'm schtill 
obbosed to dis here blan, and John, I 
wan' you to remember dat when you're 
hard up down dere and git in a fix fer 
money don' you ofifer to come aroun' 
and beck an' say you need money. I'll 
not haf any o' dat," were the father's 
concluding remarks. 

"Well, then, I'll take care of John, 
I'll pay his way. Are you satisfied 
with our arrangements, Mrs. Sher- 
man?" further inquired Mr. Halk. 

"Well, if you wati' 'o make a wors- 
less fellow out o' John, I guess we got 
'o let it go. But we shall never help 
John in dis an' if he never amounts to 
anysing, don' blame us for't," replied 
the mother. 

After this interview John and Uncle 
Jerry left for home not so well pleased 



because of the parent's half-hearted 
consent to their plans,. 

With these preparations, John set 
out for the normal school. During the 
year he was home at his uncle's and 
wrote many letters telling how he 
liked his work. He completed his 
work at the normal school that year 
with great credit and succeeded in get- 
ting one of the best teachers' certifi- 
cates from the Superintendent of Lan- 
caster County, so that he felt fully re- 
paid for his work at the normal school. 

That year Chestnut Hill school was 
vacant, for the teacher had been unsuc- 
cessful the previous year. This was a 
splendid opportunity for John to apply. 
Everybody in the community was 
agreeably surprised with the- change 
John had made in one year, especially 
in the manliness he manifested and the 
splendid record he had made for him- 
self at the normal and best of all with 
the superintendent. 

Everybody seemed willing and eager 
that John should have charge of the 
school and sure enough when the re- 
port came from the directors it showed 
a unanimous vote for John Sherman. 
John was never so happy in his life, for 
success seemed to come his way re- 
markably. 

John taught the Chestnut Hill school 
for five years in succession but then he 
saw the need of better preparation for 
his life's work. He went back to the 
normal to complete his course and he 
finished it creditably. The last report 
of the little German farmer boy was 
that he is now pursuing an advanced 
course in one of the best colleges of 
eastern Pennsylvania. Who knows 
what the future may reveal for this 
country lad of slight opportunity? 



The Heroine, Juliet. 



Elizabeth Kline. 



Shakespeare has created this "pas- 
sionate child of the South" richly glo- 
rious and alert with beauty. Reared 
under the intense blue of an Italian sky, 
this serene figfure of girlhood, clad in 
the beauty of Southern spring, steps 
out into the warmth and sunshine of 
love, and shows to the world, "that 
without which life is worthless; that 
without which, death is welcome." 

In order to understand more fully 
this "flower of Purity," we must know 
something of her influences and en- 
vironment. Her parents seem to have 
no marked affection for her, and no 
particular interest in her welfare ex- 
cept to see her married to the man of 
their choice. The nurse has filled the 
mother's place, and no wonder then 
that the mother, shallow and conven- 
tional, stands in awe of her sober, de- 
mure, steadfast daughter as she pre- 
sents to her Paris' suit. In reply to 
which Juliet calmly replies : 

"Marriage is an honor that I dream 
not of." 

And thus we see that she is entirely 
unconscious of love, and free from its 
thoughts. The glowing description of 
her wooer does not arouse her imagi- 
nation in the least, but only calls forth 
this cold response: 

"I'll look to like, if looking liking 

move ; 
But no more deep will I indart my eye 
Than your consent gives strength to 

make it fly." 



In this ideal character we find quali- 
ties which are rarely blended. She is 
beautiful, grave, highly serious, and 
possesses an imaginative refinement. 
Thus Romeo meets her, and loves her 
at first sight. Her soul lies open to 
his view. A Romeo's eye discerns at 
once her earnestness and frank sin- 
cerity, her sweet devotion, purity, and 
self-subordination. And now the in- 
spiration of the proper object kindles 
her passion. She has learned what 
love means, and the larger life of wo- 
manhood has begun. Her heart pos- 
sessed by a noble love, she is indeed 
the true woman in frankness, courage, 
and self-surrender. 

Juliet is a real heroine, and she be- 
comes such not by becoming something 
mannish, but is surprised into heroism. 
When the marriage of Paris is forced 
upon her, all her feelings as woman, 
lover, and wife are aroused. Truthful, 
she must "live an' unstain'd wife to 
her sweet love." Hudson says : "Juliet 
has both the weakness and the strength 
of a woman. For, if she appears weak 
in yielding to the touch of passion, she 
is thenceforth strong as a seraph." 
When deserted by her family and cast 
upon her own strength, resolute and 
determined, she "finds herself sufficient 
for herself." In her discourse with the 
Friar she unconsciously plays the part 
of a heroine. The remedy casts her 
into a frenzy of excitement, and her 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



imagination so strengthens her resolu- 
tion that she suffers experiences worse 
than death for the sake of Romeo's 
honour. 

"Beautiful, devoted, self-sacrificing 



Juliet! Her life has lost its goal, her 
world is empty of all that gave it 
glory, and so she sinks back into the 
sleep of death in the repose and certi- 
tude of a fulfilled career." 



Resolutions of Sympathy 

Whereas our Heavenly Father, who 
knoweth all things best, has seen wise 
to remove from her earthly home, 
Mary, the little sister of our co-work- 
er and fellow-student, Charles L. Zook, 
be it resolved : 

First, That we commend the sor- 
rowing parents, brothers, and sisters 
to our Heavenly Father who knoweth 
all our griefs and who can heal all our 
sorrows. 

Second, That we, the Faculty and 
students of Elizabethtown College, do 
hereby tender to the bereaved family 
our sincere and heartfelt sympathy. 

Third, That the bereaved family re- 
ceive a copy of these resolutions. 

Fourth, That these resolutions be 
published in Our College Times, and 
in the Lititz Express. 

Anna Wolgemuth 
Lydia C. Miller 
Owen Hershey 

Committee 



Take Notice. 

Quite a few subscriptions expire with 
this issue. We wish those whose sub- 
scription has already expired to favor 
us with a prompt renewal. We aim to 
make the paper the best paper possible, 
but to do so we need the support of our 
friends. Former students and alumni 
especially should not fail to g£t Our 
College Times. It shows your loyalty 
and interest in your Alma Mater, and 
at the same time you. are receiving 
more than you are paying for. It is 
only through the kindness of our ad- 
vertisers that we are able to publish 
this paper at the low rate of fifty cents 
a year. 

We are sure that many do not wish 
to have the paper discontinued, but 
simply neglect to renew their subscrip- 
tion when it expires. Kindly give this 
matter your attention before you for- 
get it and send your renewal to the 
Business Manager, J. D. Reber. 



iT^^^ 



Bible Term Impressions. 



In response to a call by the editor 
for some impressive truths received 
during Bible Term, the following were 
received from the student body and 
the faculty: 

If we keep walking in the footsteps 
of Jesus, we will get to the place Jesus 
is. 

Find out what you can do and then 
do it with your might. 
— Enoch walked with God ; and when 
God walked into heaven, Enoch walk- 
ed in also. 

A life lived as God directs is a 
hymn of praise. 

Struggle begets strength. 

To study the Bible successfully one 
must love the Bible. 

Ministers and Sunday School 
teachers should hide behind their 
Master. 

Character — As you make it, so you 
take it. 

We can do much by cultivating the 
powers which God has given us. 

Caleb did not fear the giants. He 
was humble and followed Israel forty 
years, but when he received his inheri- 
tance he was given the land of the 
giants. 
-^ We should "hang around" our 
Bibles, even while at work, if possible, 

The light that shines farthest 
shines brightest nearest home. 
- Our parents have made considerable 
sacrifice that we can be at school. 

Our Creator has placed us here in 
this world and has given us privileges. 
and in return expects something from 
us. 

We all have social qualties in bud 



form and can develop them if we will. 

Meditation is the daughter of re- 
tirement and the mother of devotion. 

Christ laid down his life as a good 
shepherd, arose as a great shepherd, 
and will return as the chief shepherd. 

If we attempt to pull the world after 
us as we enter the church, the result 
will be that the world has pulled us 
out of the church. 

God, Christ, and the Holy Spirit 
vote one way; the devil, the f!p"=h. n'-id 
the world vote the opposite way. You 
must cast the deciding vote. 

After conversion we are no longer 
servants but cliiiuren of the King. 

Come before the public cheerfullv, 
' leaving apologies and long faces at 
home. 

O-- everyday life will continue 
through eternity. 

The work of the kingdom means 
that I be a missionary wherever I am. 

We should "take" time to study 
God's Word, use spare moments ; but, 
above all, meditate more upon what 
we read, so as to get the truths into 
the heart and not into the head only. 

The great wisdom and tact that 
stands out so prominently in the Mas- 
ter Teacher's work is sadly lacking in 
much of our teaching and preaching 
today. 

All roads led to Rome in olden 
times, so every verse in the Bible leads 
to Jesus. 

He who would be a great soul in 
the future must be a great soul now. 

Faithfulness in the Valley of Humil- 
ity is the ladder by which we climb 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



round by round heaven-ward. 

Good common sense has never yet 
been surpassed by a College Diploma. 

In order to win, you must do the 
thing- that is worth while, do it well, 
and do it all the time. 

Do not feel that you must say some- 
thing, but feel that you have some- 
thing to say. 

Be absorbed in your message. 

The world does not owe us a living, 
but we owe the world a life. 

Bible study should be made a part 
of our daily duties. Then, he whose 
mind is in a prayerful concentrated 
mood, will surprisingly increase his 
store of Bible knowledge. 

There are two kinds of education. 
One is that which is gotten out of 
The other, and more important, is that 
tant, is that which you give yourself. 

The path to success is named Merit. 

The Old Testament says, "Do and 
be saved"; the New Testament, "Be 
saved and do." 

We see what we are trained to see, 
and hear what we have taught our- 
selves to hear. 

Unbelief and apostasy begin with 
the church. 

The morals of the home can not be 
saved without the dynamic of Christ. 

The minister must aim at unity of 
thought, at sustaining interest, and at 
making a religious impression that 
will be carried away. 

God is not after getting money out 
books. The other, and more impor- 
character in proportion to our giving. 

When sunset comes the laborer goes 
home ; when the sunset of life comes 
the Christian goes to his Heavenly 
Home ; and when life's sun has set, the 
sinner will also yearn to go home. But 
alas! he has no home. 

Some young men are too weak to 
keep a cigar out of their mouths. 

The life of any church depends 



largely on how well it supports 
education and mission work. Such 
support is a material expression of 
of spiritual well-being. 

Too many of us do not at all ap- 
preciate the work that is being carried 
on at College Hill. 

Anything in our lives that cannot be 
consecrated to the Master's service 
must be cast aside. 

More and more of our Brethren in 
Eastern Pennsylvania recognize the 
necessity of special training or educa- 
tion for all who would do efficient 
church work. These workers must 
come up through our Christian Col- 
leges. 

We should not read the BibJe heed- 
lessly but look for something when we 
read. 

Jesus aimed to reach the conscience 
of the people or person taught. 

We cannot follow in Christ's foot- 
steps unless w€ go after souls. 
^ True growth is not growing into evil 
habits. 

Faith is a definite act committing 
one's self as a sinner to Christ as his 
Savior. 

— . God had to contract the Divine so 
that the human could understand. 
Even though the Infinite had to con- 
tract himself so that we poor finite 
beings could understand, yet we cannot 
broaden ourselves to the extent that we 
can fully comprehend the Infinite. 
-- Teaching is a bursting forth of what 
has first burst in. 

-- The church should be on the alert 
to see the one God calls to the minis- 
try and then act in her call. 

Some Christians who are not very 
strong need to be dealt with as ten- 
derly as the house plant that is started 
under glass. 

It takes some people so long to do 
nothing. 



Sermons Outlines. 



By Eld. J. G. Royer. 



The Purpose and Mission of the Bible 

Text — Psalms 119:11-16. 

I. The Bible is preeminently The Book 

for all. 

(a) Thomas Carlyle says : 

1. The Bible is all men's book. 

2. It is the guide to all human 

conduct. 

(b) The Bible is God's word to man 

— to all men. 

1. It reveals God's will. 

2. It finds man's conscience. 

3. It convicts of sin and impels 

to confession. 

4. It moulds character. 

II. God's word is of priceless value. 

(a) It is God's rule of life for man — 

for all men. 

(b) It is a perfect rule. Ps. 19:7. 

1. Perfect in itself as a law. 

2. Nothing to be added or sub- 

tracted. 

3. Free from correction. 

4. Filled with all good. 

5. Fitted for the end it is de- 

signed. 

(c) Its priceless value is shown in 

the results that follow its loss. 
— Example in Judah. 

1. Judah sank rapidly after its 

loss. 

2. True worship passed away. 

3. Temple service ceased. 

4. Wickedness always means 

weakness. 
III. Manking needs a book to keep 
alive in the world the knowledge 
of a spiritual personal God. 



(a) The Bible is that book. 

1. It is the best of all books. 

2. No other suits all times and 

peoples as the Bible does. 

3. No other has so blessed man- 

kind. 

(b) Wickedness abounds where Bi- 

ble is not read. 

(c) The Church and the Bible go 

hand in hand. 

1. No church — soon no Bible. 

2. The forces that will conquer 

the world for Christ, 
(a) God's book,God's house, 
God's day, God's people. 

IV. Bible must find its way into our 

hearts. 

(a) If God's word be only in the 

Bible, it may be a long way 
from your heart. 

(b) Bible must be used to find God. 
I. Be an astronomer then a mi- 

croscopist. 

(c) God's word is a treasure worth 

laying up. 

V. The good use the Psalmist designs 

to make of it. 

(a) Hide it in the heart to keep from 

sinning. 

(b) Use it to answer spiritual ene- 

mies. 

(c) Find time to read it. 

(d) The Bible has a message for all. 
God's and Man's Work in Salvation. 

Text— I Jno. 2:15-17; Rom. 147-8; 
I. Cor. 6:19-20. 
I. Introduction. 

(a) Christians must keep out of mis- 



\ 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



chief — Negative Religion, 
(b) Christians must do good deeds 
— Positive Religion. 

II. The unconverted one is 

(a) Commanded to repent and be- 
lieve the Gospel. Mark 1:15. 

1. God gives us the power to be- 

lieve. 

2. We are commanded to exer- 

cise it. 

3. Faith grows by exercising it. 

4. Repentance is man's work. 

(a) More than sorrow for sin 
— hatred for sin — aban- 
don it. 

(b) God cannot repent for us. 

III. Conversion is more than turning 

from sin. 

(a) It is also turning to God for sal- 

vation. 

(b) Regeneration is at the bottom of 

conversion. 

1. It guarantees conversion — 

make the tree good. 

2. It is God's work in the heart. 

3. Man can not regenerate self. 

4. It is God working by the 

Spirit through the Word. 

(c) We become new creatures. 

1. We have new life, new hates. 

2. This is no mystery. 

(d) Justification follows. 

1. It is God's work. 

2. We are regarded as if we had 

never sinned. 

3. It can never precede regenera- 

tion—Justification of self 
unscriptural. 

(e) Consecration follows next. 

1. This is man's work, like faith 

and repentance. 

2. Is a voluntary offering. Rom. 

12:1. 

3. It can not precede regenera- 

tion. 



(f) Then comes sanctification. 

1. Like regeneration it is God's 

work. 

2. Is God working in the heart 

through the Word.Jno.17 :i7 

3. The sinner surrenders the bad 

for God in repentance. 

4. The Christian surrenders his 

good to God in consecration. 
IV. What may be brought into the 
cause. 
(a.) Everything that can be used or 
fitted to God's service. 

1. Our time — How spent. 

2. Our talents. ; 

(a) Song. ; 

(b; Beauty — Esther. 

(c) Business. 

(d) Money. 1 

(e) Education. 

3. All we have and do should tend 
to bring others to Christ. 

(a) In this way we grow. 
II Peter 3:18. 

(b) Live a life becoming 
holiness. 

The Law of Sacrifice, 
fc-xi — Mat. 16:24-26; Jno. 14:6. 
T. Law of sacrifice is fundamenta' 
everywhere, 
■'a) In getting a watch, farm, educa- 
tion, etc. 

(b) Life is fed by death. 

(c) Have nothing without sacrifice. 

(d) Godliness sacrifices vice, 
n. Be near Jesus. 

(a) Deny self and take up the cros.s, 

(b) Not to deny self is to deny Jesus. 

(c) We take the cross by den 'ing 
self. 

III. Straight is the gate, n.":-rov/ is th3 
way. 
(a) Why is this so? 

I. So as not to keep us out of 
heaven. 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



2. It is narrow from necessity. 

3. Only one way to be a Chris- 

tian. 

4. Each sin furnishes a path. 

(b) The nature of this way. 

1. A select way. 

(a) Uncleanness can not 
enter. 

(b) God walks with us. 

(c) Can not pull the world 
into it. 

2. A plain way. 

(a) For common people. 

(b) The critic does not find 
it. 

3. A safe way. 

(a) Hear the roaring lion 
but not be harmed. 

4. An old way. 

(a) Is still open and trav- 
eled by pilgrims. 

(b) Is the one way for sal- 
vation. 

(c) Is the way of the Savior. 

(d) Must be born again to 
get mto the way, 

5. A way through the wilderness 

(a) A highway over the 
hills of doubt. 

(b) Old, but in good condi- 
tion. 

(c) A tried way— Jesus, 
Apostles. 

(d) Our duty. 

1. Keep in the way. 

2. Point it out to others. 



Privileges of the Christian 
Text — Psalms 91 :g-i2. 

I. All who live a life of communion 

with God are constantly safe un- 
der his protection. 

(a) We must know the name of God. 

(b) We must set our love upon Him. 

(c) We must call upon Him in 
prayer — The neglect. 

II. Privileges evident by contrasting 

spiritual experiences with those 
of our homes. 

(a) Manner of approach. 

(b) Daily bread — Appetite. 

(c) Place of protection. 

1. Brings enjoyment. 

2. The world is cold spiritually 
— no home. 

3. Poor sinner — no home. 

4. Backslider, go home—Wrestle 
with God. 

(d) Time of danger. 

1. Storm — go home. 

2. Cyclone — Christ is the foun- 
dation. 

3. Sinner — go home. 

(e) Night comes on. 

1. Then, go where? Home. 

2. Life's sunset— Sinner has no 
home — Christ has. 

3. Sinner have you a home to- 
night? Sad, if not. 

4. Presence of those we love 
makes any place homelike — 
Jno. 14:21. 




EDITORIAL BOARD. 

RALPH W. SCHL08SER, '11, Editor in-Chief 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 



Orville Z. Beckeb, '15. . . . Scliool Notes 

Nora L. Reber, '11 Homerian News 

Mary Scheaffer, lo: . . . . K. 1>. S. News 

Leah Sheapfer, '09 Alumni Notes 



C. L. Martin, '13 Exchanges 

J. D. Reber, '14 Bus. .Mer. 

A. L. Reber, '13 Asst. Bus. Mer. 

DAitsY P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



Our College Times is published monthly durini^ th ; Academic year by Elizabethtown Codege. 

Arrearage on subscription to this paper is charged. 

Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates: — Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy ; five years for $2.00. 

Entered as secon i-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postottice. 



Another Bible Term has passed into 
history, and so many rich truths were 
given by the instructors that we feel 
sure the results will be far reaching. 
There is a greater interest in school 
and church work since this excellent 
feast of good things, and the only re- 
gret is that some of those who need 
the inspiration obtainable in such a 
conference, did not receive it because 
they were not present. However, we 
hope they may see the good results 
in their co-workers who attended this 
Bible Term and then plan to be pre- 



sent the next time, the Lord willing. 
We feel »'especiially encouraged in 
the work of this Bible Term because 
of the large average attendance. 
Never before were the classes attended 
as faithfully and regularly as this year. 
This indicates growth in the appre- 
ciation of the truth as it was presented, 
and of those who labored so faithfully 
for the glory of God. One instructor 
put it this way, "Never before did the 
classes ask questions so intelligently. 
This shows to me, at least, that those 
asking them are comprehending the 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



teaching that is done." This voices 
the sentiment of all of us. Then, too, 
a proof of the unusual interest this 
year is evident from the large class 
attendance of the last day's work. The 
last day was the best. It was the 
climax of the term ; the grand climax 
of all the Bible terms ever held on 
College Hill. 

We surely can not pass over another 
striking fact. The number of elders 
from adjoining congregations and from 
congregations at quite a distance, was 
much larger than that of any previous 
year. From this we feel that our 
school is spreading its influence and 
making friends. We also noticed that 
the ministers for the most part at- 
tended almost all of the sessions, in- 
stead of coming for only a few days. 
We are quite sure that next year we 
will have a larger ministerial body pre- 
sent than this year, because of the in- 
spiration for Bible study that we 
know will spread in ever widening 
circles. 

Every student of the Bible Term 
says this was the best Bible Term 
ever held here. We are sure this is 
an encouragement for the instructors. 
This expression is also a good ther- 
mometer which unconsciously gauges 
the benefits derived by those who at- 
tended the sessions. Because every- 
body has received so much inspiration 
we think it profitable to give some of 
the rich truths to our readers. We 
asked our student body for the most 
precious truth they received and have 
placed them on the preceding pages 
of this issue in the order in which they 
were received by the editor. We hope 
they may inspire our readers as we 
know they have inspired our student 
body. 



During the Bible Term Eld. J. G. 
Royer preached five soul-inspiring ser- 
mons. He has kindly given us 
his sermon outlines for publication in 
this issue of the paper. We hope they 
may be of service to those engaged in 
the Lord's work. Eld. W. B. Stover 
also preached a number of sermons 
and gave us a lecture on Mission Work. 
The messages of these beloved 
brethren were filled with the power of 
God and as a result fifteen precious 
souls resolved to follow the Savior. Can 
we determine whither the inspiration 
received at this Bible Term will lead? 
No ; God alone knows. 

Come for the Spring Term 

Under School Notes we have pub- 
lished an announcement of the Spring 
Term whidh opens March 124. We 
request all those contemplating pre- 
paration for teachers' examination to 
read the annonucement. This school 
affords some exceptional advantages, 
not to be secured at many schools. 
Many classes, up-to-date methods, per- 
sonal interest of the teacher, small 
number in class, good library, good 
equipment for special work, good moral 
atmosphere, — these are a few of the 
advantages we ofifer. 

Those who intend to board at the 
College should send in their application 
for a room as soon as possible. The 
school will not have a super-abundance 
of room during the Spring Term ; con- 
sequently those making the first appli- 
cation for a room will be given the 
preference in selecting a room. For 
further information with reference to 
your plans for the Spring Term work, 
write to our President, Dr. D. C. 
Reber. 




s 



c 


















t 



L 




The scriptures teach us the best 
"way of living, the noblest way of 
suffering, and the most comfortable 
way of dying — Flavel. 
Whence but from Heaven, could men 

unskilled in arts, 
In several ages born, in several parts, 
Weave such agreeing truths? or how, 

or why. 
Should all conspire to cheat us with 

a lie? — Dryden. 

James Hamilton says, "The Bible is 
a treasure. It contains enough to 
make us rich for time and eternity. It 
contains the secret of happy living. It 
contains the key of heaven. It contains 
the title-deeds of an inheritance in- 
corruptible and that fadeth not away. 
It contains the pearl of great price. 
Nay, in so far as it reveals them as the 
portion of us sinful worms, it contains 
the Saviour and the living God Him- 
self." 

The thirteenth Bible Term of Eliza- 
Tjethtown College extending from Jan- 
uary fifteenth to the twenty-fourth 
came and is gone, but its results will 
never die but live for ever in the in- 
spiration it has given, the Scriptural 



knowledge it has taught, the ideals it 
has raised, and the souls it has saved. 
This year's Bible Term has been the 
best of its kind yet held on ''College 
Hill." The following was the corps of 
teachers that gave instruction during 
the term : J. G. Royer, Mt. Morris, 
Illinois; S. H. Hertzler, Elizabethtown; 
J. Kurtz Miller, Brooklyn, New York; 
Lydia Stauffer, College; Jesse Ziegler, 
Royersford, Pa. ; H. K. Ober, Eliza- 
bethtown ; Katherine Miller, College ; 
\\^ilbur Stiver, Anklesvar, India. 

Chapel-filled audiences were in at- 
tendance during practically every even- 
ing service and also in the afternoon 
to hear Wilbur Stover's lectures on 
"Missions." The attendance was ex- 
ceptionally good during the whole term 
Not only was our own State repre- 
sented here but also many others such 
as New York, Illinois, Ohio, Maryland, 
and Missouri. Outside of the United 
States, Persia, India, and Africa were 
also represented thus making "College 
Hill" rather cosmopolitan. 

The first five sermons in the evening 
were given by Eld. J. G. Royer and 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the remainder by Eld. Wilbur Stover. 
On the evening of January the twenty- 
third Bro. Stover gave a special lecture 
on "World Missions." 

Abram Mallick from Urumia, Persia, 
who represents the Chaldean Evangelic 
Apostolic Church of Persia gave us 
two speeches on his mission, some of 
his experiences as a Christian with the 
Mohammedans, and the remarkable 
similarity of the doctrine of the church 
he represents and that of the Church 
of the Brethren. 

On January eighteenth the Educa- 
tional Program was rendered in the 
College Chapel during which Elder J. 
G. Royer gave a talk on "Education as 
I see it." Also an excellent address 
was given by Dr. Geo. L. Omwake, 
President of Ursinus College, on "The 
Heart of the Teacher." 

On Sunday forenoon, January the 
nineteenth, was rendered the most 
touching and forceful Temperance 
Program ever given at the College. 
Tears were shed, hearts were touched, 
and resolutions formed that will play 
their part in the abolition of America's 
great curse. Miss Naomi Longenecker 
gave us a true picture of a drunkard's 
life and home, and the misery he brings 
to others, in the pathetic story of 
"Tommy Brown." This was followed 
by a sermon on "The Social Evils of 
the Saloon" by Arthur J. Culler, Ph. 
D., Pastor of the Geiger Memorial 
Church of Philadelphia. The true 
picture and conditions of vice and sin 
associated with the saloon so vividly 
presented by Bro. Culler, should stir 
many hearts to nobler efforts against 
this agent which has brought and is 
still bringing so much degradation and 
misery into the world. 



On January twenty-first, Byron C, 
Piatt gave his lecture on "The New 
Era" to the largest audience that ever 
listened to a "Course Lecturer" at the 
College. Not only was the Chapel 
filled but also the Commercial Hall. 
This lecture is nationally regarded as 
one of the strongest lectures of its kind. 
It proved to be an eye-opener to many 
on the night of the twenty-first of Jan- 
uary. Mr. Piatt showed and proved 
very forcibly and beautifully the con- 
tribution which Jesus Christ has made 
to the social life of mankind, the in- 
sufficiency of the race unto itself, the 
ever growing power of the moral code 
of Jesus Christ and the absolute neces- 
sity of having Jesus Christ in all and 
thus purifying and raising the standard 
of the five institutions of man ; namely, 
the state or politics, industry, the 
church, the school or education, and 
the home. 

On the coming February thirteenth 
the fifth lecture of the College Course 
will be given by Hon. H. Frank 
Eshleman on the "German — Swiss Re- 
ligious Foundation and Background of 
Lancaster County." As the subject 
intimates, this is a lecture that should 
interest every one who is loyal to the 
sturdy German or Swiss blood that is 
running in his veins. 

The athletic phase of college life is 
manifesting itself mostly in basket ball. 
Three games have been played between 
the Juniors and Seniors out of the 
series of seven. They always resulted 
in a victory for the Juniors by the 
following scores, 24 to 20, 14 to 11, 27 
to 19. 

Seniors Juniors 

Diehm Center Geyer 

Martin Guard Coble 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



I^ose Guard Hershey 

Heber Forward Kulp 

Herr Forward Brandt, Garber 

Some creature only known to those 
beleiving superstitions, and unknown to 
most of uSj must have been meddHng 
in our basket ball games between the 
■"Day Students" team and the "Board- 
ing Students" team. When the last 
lialf ended in both games the score was 
tie 2^ to 22, and then this unknown 
•creature interfered and gave both 
games to the "Day Students" team by 
the score of 25 to 23. 

Day Boarding 

Geyer Center Diehm 

Martin Guard Hershey 

Garber Guard Coble 

Reber Forward Kulp 

Herr Forward Becker 

The sturdy German team carried off 
the victory over the Lancaster County 
German team in the last two games 
played by the scores of 2y to 14 and 21 
to 15. This makes the score in games 
3 to 2 in the seven game series. 
German L. C. German 

Diehm Center Geyer 

Garber Guard Hershey 

Reber Guard Coble 

Herr Forward Kulp 

Becker Forward Martin 

Mr. Rose while making cocoa: "My, 
but that hot water makes the cococu- 
lar molecules excited with molecular 
motion." 

Two new faces added to the College 
group since Christmas vacation are 
those of Misses Bertha Perry and 
Lilian Falkenstein. 

Mr. Kreider to Mr. Hoffman after 
receiving a favor: "Ich donke dich." 

Mr. Hoffman : "I want you to stop 
calling me a donkey." 

On December thirty-first a "watch 



night" meeting was held in Music Hall 
starting at 11:30. The meeting ad- 
journed some time in the following 
year. As the hands on the college 
clock neared twelve that night the bell 
in the tower slowly tolled out the old 
year and rang in the new. 

"Rang out the bad. Rang in the 
true." 

Question : "Why does Miss Stauffer 
want a sewing machine?" 

Messrs. Amos Geib and Earhart, 
Alumni of the school, paid a visit to 
College Hill on December 21. 

Rufus Bucher conducted a series of 
meetings in the Church of the Breth- 
ren of Elizabethtown from December 
21 to January 7. There were five con- 
verts. 

Horace Reber who has been very 
ill with pneumonia is now considered 
out of danger. 

If you have not yet renewed your 
subscription for Our College Times, 
please do so at once. 

Mr. Lciter has written an excellent 
thesis in sociology on "The Art of 
Home Making," which is richly sup- 
plemented by his personal knowledge. 
Anyone wishing to know which af- 
fords the greater joy, pursuit or posses- 
sion, will find in Mr. Leiter a person 
fully qualified to answ^er the question. 
On the night of January nth, Col- 
lege Hill saw the best social ever held 
within its walls. A new precedent was 
set when the social of that night was 
not conducted under the management 
of the social committee but by the 
Physics class. It is hoped that other 
classes will follow the example set by 
this class. The first part of the enter- 
tainment was conducted by Prof. Mey- 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



er, Physicist, who gave an entertain- 
ment in Music Hall on the "Funny Side 
of Physics." He was aided by the 
physics class. This was followed by 
demonstrations in three of the class 
rooms conducted by the physics stu- 
dents. After this, refreshments were 
served in the library, which was very 
beautifully decorated. A poem was 
sung by the class on that evening to 
the music of "The Old Oaken Bucket." 
It was composed in an hour's time and 
was beautifully rendered. 

K. L. S. News 

On account of religious services 
in town the Society did not render a 
program on January 3. We are glad 
that the Society looked upon preach- 
ing services above its own meetings 
so that the members might enjoy 
hearing the Word of God. The follow- 
ing program was rendered on January 
10. 
Inaugural Address — "The Duties of 

the New Year." President Moyer. 
Vocal Solo~"Rock Me to Sleep." 

Delia Shank. 
Declamation — "The Isthmus of Pana- 
ma." Henry Brandt 
"Biography of Vv oodrow Wilson." 

J. S. Lineaweaver. 
Piano Duet — "Midsummer Night's 

Dream." Misses Sheaffer and Shank 
Select Reading — "Josiah Allen's Wife 

at A. T. Stewart's Store." Carrie 

Dohner. 
Recitation— "Little Boy Blue." Ruth 

Reber. 
Vocal Solo — "The Song the Angels 

Sang." Ruth Coble 

Literary Echo — "Naomi Longenecker 

On January 17, the Society met in 
executive session. Five persons made 



application to become active members 
of the Society. The following pro- 
gram was then rendered. 
Piano Solo — "Grand Valse Caprice."^ 

Carrie Dennis. 
Declamation — "North American In- 
dians." O. Z. Becker. 

Vocal Solo — "Among the Fields of 

Nazareth." Sarah Moyer. 

Debate — Resolved, That 'the United 

States has reached her zenith. 
It was discussed afifirmatively by 
Messrs. Harry Nye and William 
Kulp. 
Negatively by Messrs. Edgar Diehrrr 
and C. L. Martin. The judges de- 
cided in favor of the affirmative. 
Music— "Alles Still," German Quartet. 
Address — "How to Win," J. Kurtz 
Miller. 

On January 24, the Society met irt 
private session. The following were 
elected regular officers for the next 
month : 

President, E. G. Diehm ; Vice Presi- 
dent, Elam Zug; Secretary, Helen 
Oellig; Editor, Rebekah Slieaffer; 
Critic, Miss Leah Shaeffer. 

Homerian News 

At their last private meeting the 
Homerians elected new term officers.. 
The election resulted as follows: 

Speaker, Ruth C. Stayer; Vice 
President, Isaac J. Kreider ; Chaplain, 
Prof. J. G. Meyer; Monitor, Nora L. 
Reber ; Recording Sec, Gertrude Mil- 
ler; Critic, Leah M. Sheaffer. 

On Friday afternoon, January 24,. 
a public program was rendered in 
Music Hall. Every performer seemed , 

to do his best. The addresses given jJ 
at this meeting by two of our Bible 
Term instructors, W. B. Stover and 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



J. G. Royer, were much appreciated. 
The following features constituted the 
program : 

Prayer .Chaplain 

Solo— "Nazareth.". . .Katherine Miller. 
Reading— "When Love and Duty 

Meet." Leah M. Sheaffer 

Address Wilbur Stover 

Oration — "A Handful of Corn." 

B. F. Waltz. 

Vocal Duett— "Go Pretty Rose" 

Katherine Miller, Elizabeth Kline. 

Address J. G. Royer 

Critic's Report Leah Sheaffer 



THE SPRING TERM 



Reorganization of Class Work 

On March jj the Spnng Term opens 
to continue twelve weeks and offers 
excellent advantages to those who have 
been teaching as well as to prospective 
teachers. Many new classes will be 
formed and most of the work wi!l be 
reorganized. For others wishing to 
do college preparatory work, there will 
be a number of classes suit<j:i to their 
needs during the spring te'-m. Ti-'cre 
will be opportunities for those who 
have beer teaching and wish to take up 
a commercial, agricultural, or Bible 
course. 

Faculty 

The Faculty consists of thoroughly 
trained and tried teachers who have 
made special preparation for their par- 
ticular work and who have a long re- 
cord of successful experience. It is 
ample to accommodate the many new 
students that enter for the Spring 
Term. 



DEPARTMENTS 

Collegiate 
The College Department offers regu- 
lar work in the classical course along 
the line of Latin, Greek, German, 
French, English, Mathematics, and 
Pedagogy. 

Pedagogical 

In the Pedagogical Department, 
classes in Elementary Pedagogy, Meth- 
odology, Genetic Psychology, Systems 
of Education, Ethics, and Philosophy 
of Teaching will be conducted. The 
Class of 1913 is the last class to finish 
the old course. Next year's class will 
be graduated in the recently revised 
and enlarged four year's Pedagogical 
Course which is fully as strong as that 
offered by the Normal School. 

English Scientific. 

Such classes will be formed in the 
common school branches as will be 
adapted to the needs of those who may 
be coming from the public schools. 
All branches required by those who 
take the teachers' examination will be 
taught during the Spring Term, in- 
cluding History of Pennsylvania,. 
Civics, Algebra, American Literature, 
Drawing, and General History. 

College Preparatory 

Classes in Caesar, Cicero. Vergil,. 
Elements of Latin, Plane Geometry, 
English Classics, and Etymology will 
be formed. 

Commercial 

The Commercial Department offers 
thorough, revised, and up-to-date 
courses necessary for a commercial 
education equal to the best. Classes 
in Bookkeeping, Commercial Arith- 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



metic, Rapid Calculation, Business Cor- 
respondence, Shorthand, and Type- 
writing will be conducted. 

Music 

The Music Department offers daily 
instruction and practice in Chorus 
Singing, Sight Reading, Theory of 
Music, Harmony, in addition to les- 
sons in Voice Culture, Piano, and Or- 
gan. The high standard of work of 
former years is maintained in this de- 
partment which is amply equipped 
with teachers and instruments. 

Industrial 

Elementary Agriculture will be 
taught as well as more advanced sub- 
jects along this line. Persons wishing 
to take up the Sewing Course offered 



in this department will also be ac- 
commodated during the Spring Term. 

Bible 

The Bible Department offers a num- 
ber of classes that meet daily for Bible 
study. There are also classes in 
Mission study and Sunday School 
Teacher-Training meeting weekly. 

Expenses 

The expense for boarding students 
for the Spring Term amounts to fifty- 
five dollars. For day students the ex- 
pense is eighteen dollars and fifty 
cents. 

For further information apply to the 
President, who will be pleased to mail 
the annual catalogue and receive your 
application for a room. 



~-^^^^:^ 




Elizabethtown College is always 
glad to receive letters from her sons 
and daughters. Recently, during the 
Bible Term a very interesting and en- 
couraging one came to the Bible Term 
students from Kathryn C. Ziegler, '08. 
She longed to be at her Alma Mater to 
enjoy the good things but as she was 
denied that privilege she tried to en- 
courage others to lay hold of the op- 
portunity. It is gratifying to know 
that one as far away as India should 
still think of us on the Hill. 

Lillian Falkenstein, '11, and Mary 
Royer, '07, have resigned their posi- 
tions as teachers at Hebron Seminary, 
Nokesville, Virginia. Miss Falken- 
stein is now taking further work at this 
place. 

Elma Brandt, '11, is at present filling 
the position of bookkeeper in the 
Huntzberger-Winters Store in Eliza- 
bethtown. Her loyalty to the school 
is shown by her visits to the College. 

Elizabeth Kline, '10, is now continu- 



ing her voice work with Mme. Osborne 
of the Sternberg Conservatory of Phila- 
delphia. She makes weekly visits to 
the city. 

The school received visits after the 
holidays from Holmes S. Falkenstein, 
'10, and Amos P. Geib, '08. 

A baby girl, Leah Elizabeth, recently 
entered the home of S. G. Meyer, '10. 
Another member added to the cradle 
roll! 

During the Bible Term a number of 
the Alumni visited the school and at- 
tended different sessions of the Bible 
work. The following were present,, 
part or all of the time : Amos Hotten- 
stein, Mary Hess Reber, Carrie B. Hess 
Mary E. Myers, Andrew Hollinger, J. 
H. Breitigan, John Miller, Will E. 
Glasmire, Martha Martin, Mary Stayer 
Groff, Elma Brandt, Irene Wise. Viola 
Withers, Abel Madeira, Enoch Madeira 
W. F. Eshelman, Martin Brandt, Stella 
Hoflfer Bufifenmeyer, Nora L. Reber, 
H. L. Smith, C. M. Neff, and J. Z. Herr. 




For All. 

In searching- for a characteristic 
which determines the success of any 
editorial staff we could decide upon no 
other than good taste,— good judgment 
of the beautiful, the harmonious, the 
sublime. Consider a man who writes 
in a charming style and soon you at- 
tribute his success to good taste. It 
is the determining characteristic of the 
artist. In fact, anyone without it is al- 
most nothing. 

Manifestations of taste, — bad, ordi- 
nary, or good, — are easily noticed in 
school papers; the selection of the ma- 
terial, the cuts, the arrangement of the 
material, the color of paper, the type, 
and what not, — all other manifestations 
of taste. Pick up a paper with poor 
material poorly arranged and you can 
draw no other conclusion than that 
something is lacking. 

Expressions of good taste are not 
due to the god of chance. To show 
good taste, one must have it ; for, how 
can we show that we do not have. Ef- 
fort for only a day will not produce it. 
Every paper we publish we must judge 
by the presence of the good, the su- 
blime, and the beautiful. 



If you plan cuts for your paper do 
not give up until you have produced 
something that has some significance. 
Do not allow any sort of material to be 
printed in your paper. Blank space is 
better than space covered with material 
worse than nothing. Furthermore, 
never judge your paper by what the 
many say but by the remarks of the ac- 
complished few. They should consti- 
tute your criteria. , 

The Western Maryland College 
Monthly is altogether neat in appear- 
ance. We wish to commend this pa- 
per for having courage enough to stand 
up straight. 

Whether "The Examination" in the 
Spectrum pictures a bit of experience 
or not, 'it seems very true to life. 

If you wish to know how to keep up 
to the standard just notice how The 
Weekly Gettysburgian, the Albright 
Bulletin, and the Susquehanna do 
things. "Trash," "superabundance of 
athletic news," "borrowed bosh," and 
"would-be-wit" are not to be found on 
their pages. The chief characteristic 
of their papers is an obvious expres- 
sion of good taste. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



paper would be more creditable to the 
school it represents. 

The Budget comes to us neat and 
well done. A few good stories or es- 
says would help to give the paper 
proper balance. 

Please notice the* inconsistency of 
the Courant. Read the editorial on 
New Year and get the editor's view in 
regard to smoking. Then examine 
the cut for that department of the pa- 
per. The author of "The Chink" needs 
to be congratulated. The joke depart- 
ment, the most important (?) part 
of the paper should not be mixed with 
the advertisements. 



The M. H. Aerolith is keeping up to 
the standard. 

The Narrator — About five pages of 
solid material, and about five pages of 
athletic news and "would-be-witti- 
cism." Balance needed. 

The New Year poem and the three 
following articles, especially "After 
Many Days," in tKe Philomathean 
Monthly, deserve a reading. 

We are glad to greet the "The Ori- 
ole". As a whole it is a worthy paper. 
However its cuts might be a little more 
ssignificant. If some of the things that 
seem rather trashy were eliminated, the 



Fresh and Smoked Meats 



S. 1^ 

S. Market St. 



0pp. Exchange Bank 



Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. None 
Better, Te-w as Good. 

D. H. BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTO'WN 



The baker who knows how. Phone or drop a postal 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of AH Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPUES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



CENTRAL 



MEAT 



MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



H. H. GOOD 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 

R. H. SHISSLER. 



The Pratt 
Teachers' Agency 

70 Fifth AveMue 
Ne-w York 



Receives calls at all seasons for college 
and normal graduates, specialists and 
other teachers in colleges, public and 
private schools in all parts of the coun- 
try. 

Advises parents about schools. 

WM. O. PRATT, Manager 



Plain Suits, Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats. 

GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange Sts., Lancaster, Pa. 

Elizabethtown Dental 
Parlors 

Office Closed Thursday 
and Friday 

S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 

Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



26 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



jiiBiiiiniiiiHiiia<':iniiiiwiiiininiiiiiniiiiniiiinimi»'iW'ii^ 

' College Jewelry cf the Better Sort = 

G. Wm^REISNER | 

Manufacturing | 

Jeweler 

Class Pins and Ri Prize Caps B 

Fraternity Jcr^'^'i^.. ■" >.iedals B 

120 East*Gr = ec-..iut Street. B 

LANCASTER, PA. | 

itfjiiiiBiiiiiaiiiiiBiiiiiaiiiiiBiiiiiEiiiiiBHiiiaiiiiiaiiiiintiiiBtiiiiBifiiiBttMiaii' 



■I"i"l"I"H"l"I"I"l"l"I"H"l"I"I"H"I"I"I"I"H " W"W" !' 

I LEO KOB I 

i 

Heating and | 

PlnmbiEig | 

t ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. | 

t * 

•_ -•- -•- -•--•- -•- -•- -•- -•- -•- -•- _•- .»-.<L -♦„•--•- -•--♦— ^—^-^y^ ataatarfiiTiArfniTnTr 



$ F. T. Muth H. M. Muth 

I MUTH BROS. 

% Dealers in 

iLUMBERo 

4. Also all kinds of building material 
4. and mill work, Slate and Cement, 
Wheeler Screens, Fertilizer, Patent 
Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board, etc. 

COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. 

We also aim to give you a square 
deal that will merit your trade and 
friendship. 



T ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. f 

* ........... . . . . .,..,..,.., ...... * 



DENTIST 

GEO. R. KERSEY 
Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PA. 



1 WE DO IT RIGHT. 



Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES CBl SON 

F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 

Horseshoeing a Specialty. 

N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 



J. GROFF & SONS 

eat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



ie 



— if you want to. Ye3, in ar.y posi- 
tion, any pocket. 

Boys: carry the Parker Jack Knife 
Pen in your trousers j>ocket along 
wi h your keys. 

Girls : carry it in the pocket of 
y ur white blouse. 

i'iay football v,itS it, — basketball, 
tennis, hockey. It's on the job the 
minute you want to wr!ie, v/ithout 
heaving a pinhead SE>ot of ink any- 
where it has been rarr. .d. 

Wiite? Just im g ne a pen of 
c!jss that melts to irk as you sl.de it 
across paper! That's the way it writes. 

Price $2. 50 up. Get one on tilrl. 
Take it back any time wi...;n 1 
days if you're not tJcLlcd to death 
witli it. We au.lioriie dealer to re- 
fund. If your dealer doesn't carry 
Parkers, write us for catalog today. 

PARKER PEN COMPANY 
Mill St., Janesville, Wis. 



' f'^' ,'-9 





$j.oo 



For sale at the Bookroom. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 27 



1900 1912 

IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 

SEVEN REASONS : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance, 
Christian Home. 
Modern Equipment. 

For further particulars, address 

Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN PA. 



28 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-Made Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 



North East Corner Centre Square, 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



JACOts FISHER 
Watchmaker & Jeweler 

€enter Square, Ellzabethtown, Penna. 

With vou for 31 vears. That's All 



Ef ril ■ Lsl 



FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
will convince. Work guaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown. Pa. 



WOOD, gra:n, feed, flour. 

Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Bell ami Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 

46 E. King St., Lancaster, Pa. 



CHOICE 



TS 



A. K. Young 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



W. R. Ashenfelter I 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied with 
Fancy Cakes at short notice. 



S. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Ind. Phone 



Hours 8 to 6 



DR. JEROME G. HESS mm[^:^^y^-w^^ 
DENTIST JiilPi 

Hertzler Bldg. 
Elizabethtown Pa. 




Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 

Choloe Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees, Fresh Country Butter and Eggs 

Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Penn» 



We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 



Y. M. C. A. Bldg., 



Lancaster, Pa. 



iH. H. BRAND7 



Dealer in 

ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



♦ Elizabethtown, 



Penna. T 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



THE ''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabethto wn's est Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year* Samp}'" Copies Free 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
Shipped every Wednesday 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



^ 



Sporting Goods 



Post Cards 



Agent for all periodicals. 

Pocket cutlery, toys, novelties, etc. 

Fine confections. 

H. K. Dorsheimer 

Bell 'Phone 38-3 
On the Square, Elizabethtown Pa. 



School Supplies 



Stationery 



John A. Fisher 



BABBER 



'Centre Square, 



Elizabethto-wn, Pa. 



♦ COLUMBIAN AND RED CROSS 

I Heaters and Ranges \ 

The Finest Lines Made 



Jos. H. Rider & Son 

J ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




D. B. KLll^E 

CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



GEO. A. FISHER 

HARDWARE 

Automobiles 
Phonographs and 
Records 
F. P. GAS PLANTS 



ELIZABETHTOWN. 



PENNA. 



►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« ♦♦^ ♦< 

ELIZABETHTOWN 



I ROLLER mills! 



J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades o/ 

FLOUR AND FEED 



Highest Cash Prices paid for grain, 
hay and straw 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. ^ 

♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 



The Bee Hive Store 



South Market and^Bainbridge Streets, Etizabethtown, Pa. 

Dry Gccds,Nctions, Shoes, Carpets, Draperies and an Up-to-Date line 
Gent's and Ladies' Furnishings 

''SOIMETHif^G NEW EVERY DAY" 



of 




The Duplex 

Recommends Literary 
and Commercial teachers 
Secretaries and Account- 
ants. Schools for sale. 
Circurlars free. Write 
for further information. 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



D. G. BRIiySER 



Goal 



Grain, Flour, 
Seeds, Hay, 
and Fertilizer. 



Feed, 
Straw > 
> 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 



A farmer once to a certain age ^ 

/In the Lunch Room Business did en- ^ 

gage. 

T'was Nissley. 
Thousands of people now are fed, 
Pure, delicious, quick. Enough said. 

TRY NISSLEY 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. 



Lunches 



Telephones. 



D. W. MIESSE 

Baker and Confectioner 

123 N. Queen St. 

LANCASTER, PA. 



Ice Cream 



Water Ice 






Ursinus CoBleg^e 

COLLEGEVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA J 

(24 miles from Philadelphia.) 



O jjanized and administered under the Gmup Sys- 
tem of Instruction, providing both liberal culture and 
special preparation for the various vocations, an 
arrangement presenting exceptional advantages for 
efficiency and economy All groups open to women 
as well as men Write for special bulletin and 
4» descriptive pamphlet. 

|[ A. Edwin Keigwin D.D., President. 

* Geo. Leslie Omwake, Pd.D., Vice-Pres. 

* ,,,,,, „ • 



I Spalding Sporting Goods 



Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, 
GoJf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic 
Shoes. Kodaks .and Cameras, de- 
veloping and finishing. 

H. B. H E R R 
30-32 West King Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 



mm 



IF ITS MUSIC OR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, WE HAVE IT! 



IRirR Johnson Si Co. 



MUSIC HALL 



(16-18 West King Street, 

niHIIIIiliiilHiiilHIillllllllllllillHlliinillll 






iiiiiini. 



iinii! 



LANCASTER, PA. 

nB!!m'm»tiiiHiiiniiiHiiniiiHiiiHiiiim; 



Mention Our Q)llege Times When Writing. 



31 



************************** ************************************ 

Mail Orders Solicited for I 
Books and Bibles 

THE BOOK STORE 



$ 



2 

■« _ _ _ . . * 



G 



FALKE^^STEEN, EHzabethtown, Pa 



Ipainting anb (paper 
Ibanging 

AMOS B. DRACE 



Ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 

Catalogues a Specialty 

311 W. Grant St., LANCASTER, PA. 



•is the cry of man and horse. The 
horse says "It pulls so easy" and the 
man says "It rides so nice and lasts 
so long." So come my neighbor, get 
yourself such an outfit and be pleased 
yet more than that. 

REBER WAGON WORKS 
Centreport, Pa. 



r 



S. G. GRAYBILL 



"=^ 




^ 



College Hill Dairy 

Fresh milk and cream daily. All milk 
tested for children; free from tuberculosis 
HOTELS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED 



^ 



TAKE YOUR:) 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morning. 
Returns Wednesday and Friday afternoon. 



CALL AT 
RALPH GROSS SHAVING PARLOR 
Conducted on sanitary principles. 

Massaging a Specialty. 
Agency of First-Class Laundry. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



4^il/\lAl/V^/\l/\lAlAlAl/\lAli'\^\^A^/il/\^Al/ 



2 O. N. HEISEY I 

^ Provisions, Groceries, CBi, Choice Candies ^ 



:^ HEISEY BUIIiDING 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. ^ 



=??(fyi>(fMfy(fMf>ff\'f>(fW(fy(f>(fMf>(fMf>'f\(f>(f\ffMfMf>(f>(^^ 



32 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



xchange 



Bank 



Transacts a general banking business, pays in- 
terest on time deposits, solicits your patronage 



OFFICERS 

A. G. HEISEY, Pres. ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 



DIRECTORS 



A. G. Heisey Jos. G. Heisey B. H. Greider, H. J. Gisb 

Allen A. Coble Dr. H. K. Blough Henry E. Landis J. H. Buch 

Dr. A M. Kalbach Geo. D. Boggs B. E. Hernly 



I P. N. Kraybilll 

« Both 'Phoues 'Z 

Rheems, - Penn'a t 

Dealer in 

Groceries, Dry Goods, Notions, 
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 



Hardware, Paints, Oils, Turpen- 
tine and Glass 



^ Oilcloth, Linoleums, Matting, Win- 
dow Shades and Strips 



Soliciting a Share of Your Business * 



Viiiiiaii 



IIBIIIIIBII!llinilll!nillllHII 



Warner's 

Corsets 

are the only corsets that are en- 
dorsed so fully and strongly to us. 

Guaranteed to shape fashion- 
ably, to fit comfortably, and not 
to rust, break or tear. 

You connot say any more in 
favor of a corset excepting to give 
its price — 

$1.00 to $2.00 Per Pair 

If we could say just the things 
that we say about Warner's Rust- 
Proof Corsets, it would make 
any corset worth while ; but 
WARNER'S are the only corsets 
we can make this absolute state- 
ment regarding. 

Huntzberger-Winters Co. 

ElilZABETHTOWN, PA. 



iiiHir 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



"It's not what we say we do; 
It's what we do." 

How often have you read the promises of men? 

How often have you paid the penalty afterwards? 

We often question the advisability of telling about 
the clothes we sell, for talk is cheap. However, there is 
only one way to interest the man who doesn't know us 
and that is to advertise. So, we are forced to use this 
method of getting in touch with you. 

This advertisement is not going to say a single word 
about our clothes. Its only object is to invite you to 
visit our shop. When you arrive here we'll show you. 

Can we hope to see you soon? 

"FOLLOW THE ARROW" TO 

S. M. MYERS & CO. 

CLOTHIERS — FURNISHERS — HATTERS 
12 East King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 



Our Advertisers arc Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Hertzler's Department Store 




Black Cat 




Your need3 supplied at satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, Groceries, Ready-to-Wear Clothing tor Men 
and Women of all ages. Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oilcloth 
Shoes, Etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents tor Made-to-Measure 



CLOTHING 



International Tailoring Co., New York. 
American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chicago. 
Up-to-Date Samples on Hand. 



HERTZLER BROS. & CO. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier 



U. S. DEPOSITORY 



Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital Surplus and Profits $I57,000»00 



General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid on special 
deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 





D 1 R E C T : S 




W. S. Smith 


Elmer W. iStrickler 


Peter N. Rutl 


F. W. GrofV 


J. S. Risser 


B. L. Ge;> er 


E. C. (and. ; 


Amos G. Coble 


J E. Lobie 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



' 



Carl Schlotzhauer 



« 



The Students Official 
Photographer 



: 



^ 



Don't have your Pho- 
tos taken anywhere else 
or you will regret it. 

You are invited to vis- 
it our studio and notice 
the 1912 Photography, 
something new and differ- 
ent than you have ever 
seen before. 



Mf 



SPECIAL RATE TO STUDENTS 

163 N. Queen St. 

OPPOSITE HOTEL WHEATLANI 



^mmmn^^m mtwmm 



W« Are Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made to Order 



Plain 
Clothing 

In This Country 

When in Lancaster it will pay 
you to visit ours, the- only 
Clothing Store in that city that 
has One Price to All and gives 
discounts to none. See us for 

MEN'S READY MADE AND 
MADE TO ORDER 

Clothing 

AND 

Furnishing 

YOUTH'S AND BOYS' 
CLOTHING 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Since 1854 at 

Centre Square, Next to City Hall 

LANCASTER, .PA. 




Q^Tf/y^ 




LITTLE THINGS 5 

AN AWAKENING TO THE REALTY OF 

LIFE 6 

THE SCHOOL AS A SOCIAL CENTRE 8 

CONTRIBUTIONS OF GREECE TO 

CIVILIZATION II 

YE OLDE SCHOOLE DAYES 13 

EDITORIALS 14 

SCHOOL NOTES 17-21 

CLASS SOCIAL 19 

K. L. S. NEWS 20 

HOMERIAN NEWS 20 

ALUMNI 22 

RESOLUTIONS OF SYMPATHY 23 

EXCHANGES 24 



®«r fflnlk^^ ®tm?0 



Vol. X Elizabicthtown, Pa., March, 1918 No. 6 



Little Things. 



A little coin on service bent its busy circuit made, 

Quickening the pulse where'er it went of industry and trade; 
Anon and oft with cheery chink it dropped into the till. 

Full soon to add another link of ministration still. 
It lessened want throughout the land, it eased the load of debt; 

All welcomed it with open hand, and parted with regret. 
I watch thee on thy devious ways, my unpretentious dime. 

And here thy much belated praise I celebrate in rhyme. , 

Borne by the awful crimson flood that surges through our frame, 

Minute corpuscles in the blood fulfil their useful aim; 
In myriads they the current throng, and yet with naught of strife 

Each bears in ceaseless haste along its tiny freight of life ; 
It kindles aspiration high, it moves the giant arm. 

The beaming smile and lustrous eye both owe to it their charm; 
Each vital organ feels its thrill, each sense it renders keen; 

With magical unerring skill it labors all unseen. J 

One day a gentle being spoke a sympathetic word. 

And thus a faltering soul awoke, to noble action stirred; 
That simple word of sunshine thrives though born but of a breath, 

Reflected in a thousand lives it triumphs over death. 
The blood which streams with muffled roar some day shall cease to flow. 

The industrious coin at last no more on helpful errands go, 
But the music of a kindly word shall still reverberate 

Until its echo clear is heard at heaven's pearly gate. , 

— Nescis. 



An Awakening to the Reality of Life. 



Grace Moyer 



I cannot recall of ever having paused 
long to consider the question : Am I 
going away to school? To me that 
had always seemed to be an understood 
fact. Nor did I have much trouble 
to decide to what school I should go, 
for after Kathryn came to Elizabeth- 
town College it was definitely decided, 
in my own mind at least, that this 
school would be my choice. There 
has always been an unusually close 
tie existing between Kathryn and me, 
which makes her influence over me 
very great. She told me much of her 
school life at this place and I came 
to feel as if I knew the school through 
her. I looked forward with eager 
anticipation and great expectancy to 
the time when I should be a student 
in this school. I built air castles and 
dreamed dreams about it until the time 
came that my dreams were to 
materialize into reality. 

My experiences with life were very 
few ; with few exceptions my life up 
until this time had passed smoothly. 
I was sheltered in a good home ; coun- 
selled by wise parents ; and made 
happy by many friends. Thus I left 
home, little realizing what the months 
about to come would mean to me. or 
how they would influence my life. En- 
thusiastic and expectant I came to 
school, with interest and faith in all 
about me. 

In due time the novelty and strange- 
ness of school life wore off and I at- 
tempted to settle down, but for some 
reason something did not seem right ; 



I was not happy; I was disappointed. 
The reality was not the dream. School 
life was not the rosy picture I had 
painted ; nothing seemed as I had 
thought it would be ; the students were 
not as I expected them to be. Al- 
though everyone treated me kindly, 
yet I had a feeling I could not ex- 
plain, — I never felt so friendless in my 
life. Though I longed for home, I 
never once thought seriously of leav- 
ing school. I had come for a purpose 
and that purpose must be fulfilled. 
Nor did I ever write home to anyone 
but to Kathryn my real feelings about 
the school, for a strange feeling of 
loyalty forbade me to do so. 

As time passed my disappointment 
grew, and added to this I became dis- 
couraged because my work in my 
studies fell so far below the standard 
I had set. I was depressed and began 
to take a pessimistic view of the 
situation. There were times in which 
I would forget and be very happy, 
but when they had passed I would 
feel just that much the more depressed. 

When I would see those about me 
successful and happy in their work. 
I had to fight against a feeling of envy 
and resentment. I thought I did not 
care, but I did care — I cared greatly 
when others surpassed me in my work. 

But this condition of mind could 
not continue long under the influences 
of this school. The religious atmos- 
phere influenced me greatly, especially 
as I had recently acknowledged Christ 
as my personal Saviour and since I felt 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the need of strength and help very 
keenly. Under these influences I came 
to a realization of the fact that I had 
erred and was at fault. I found that if I 
had fully surrendered my will and 
heart to God, my life would be changed 
more than it was. I Ihad allowed 
things to creep into my life which 
would take constant fighting to over- 
come. This realization brought about 
a revolution in my life. I no longer 
thought so much about the students 
around me, but I began to study my- 
self and I at once began to find where 
I stood. Here lay the whole trouble 
in a nutshell — it was self. I had ex- 
pected things which I had no right to 
expect ; I had failed to count the cost, 
In many ways it was I myself that 
had caused my disappointment. I did 
not realize this all at once, but by de- 
grees under the influences of the 
school, through the words and living 
examples of those whom I met day 
after day, thus the realization dawned 
upon me. I began to reform ; to 
change myself; to alter my ideas; and 
to right the wrong where I could do 
so. I knew that I was insuflicient of 
myself to be able to do this, but with 
help from higher power I meant to 
do what I could. ]\Iy attitude toward 
life w^as entirely changed and with 
this change all else seemed to change. 
I beg'an to understand the cause for 
various things which hitherto I failed 
to see. 

In the live? of those about me I 
learned that large souls and much 
heart culture existed. I began to real- 
ize that true greatness was a matter of 
what was in th'f* heart. Then, too, I 
perceived that charact • -/as far 
greater than all o^her atta; '■ •. nts. I be- 
gan to see cjualitiis in tl:'\Si about me 



which hitherto I had not noticed. I 
learned that happiness does not come 
to those who wait for it or expect to 
have it without doing anything for it. 
I found that it was true service to 
others rising from unselfish motives, 
which brings genuine happiness. Then, 
too, I had foolishly avoided people ex- 
pecting them to come to me, and 
thought that if they did not approach 
me, my company was not desired. 
I now see that this was a false view 
and I also see that just in proportion 
as you give of yourself to the world 
and for the benefit of others, so will 
your reward of love from others be 
measured to you. 

My view of popularity and success 
in school was completely changed. It 
does not necessarily mean that a per- 
son who has many talents is the one 
who is most popular in school. 
Though this is always of value, yet the 
matter rests entirely with the individ- 
ual himself. It is his personality 
wdiicli counts and the character which 
reinforces him. And it is in the power 
of everyone to develop both character 
and personality. „ 

Neither do I now look with envy at 
people who are successful in their 
w^ork. I also realize that there is no 
one who is not endowed with some 
talent and as he makes use of it, he 
is given other talents. Success is not 
reached at a single bound but by con- 
stant effort. 

There was a time when I looked 
upon cheerfulness as a quality which 
some people fortunately possessed. I 
now feci that it is something which 
w^e owe the world, owe to those about 
us, and that it is our duty to cultivate 
it. 



8 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



In fact, after summing it all up, I 
feel that it has been the influence and 
spirit of Elizabethtown College which 
has caused me to awaken to the fact 
that "Life is what me make it," no 
matter where, or in what circumstances 
we may be. I feel that I have received 
something invaluable and priceless 



during the months which I have been 
here. The attitude of the teachers, 
who, to a large extent, make the school, 
has always been such toward me, that 
I have felt that they expected me to 
do my best and their hope in me has 
goaded me more than anything else to 
make an earnest eflfort. 



The School As a Social Centre 



C. L. Martin 



Today there is no corner of the 
United States so remote, no rural dis- 
trict so isolated^ and no town or vil- 
lage so insignificant that it does not 
have its public school. At some time 
during his life every individual attends 
these schools. It matters not whether 
he be the son of a farmer or merchant, 
a miner or millionaire, a Christian or 
an infidel, a Catholic or Protestant, or 
whether he be white or black, he is 
found there. The public school is the 
only institution that does not make 
any distinction whatever, with respect 
to religious belief, class or color, as to 
who shall enter its doors and take ad- 
vantage of its benefits. All are al- 
lowed the privilege to attend it. 

Seeing the wide scope, the unlimited 
range, and the unhindered universality 
of the school, w6 may not hesitate to 
conclude that it is the most fitting, 
the most appropriate, and the most 
widely accepted nucleus around which, 
should centre many of the activities of 
the community. 



The Question may arise, should there 
be centralization of activity in a com- 
munity? It has long been concluded 
that social contract and centralization 
of the interests of society constitute 
the main-spring of racial advancement. 
Isolate man from his comrades and he 
ceases to develop, but group men of 
like interests, and to what heights will 
they not attain? If the stock raisers 
of a community discuss among them- 
selves different questions pertaining to 
their occupation, they will as individ- 
uals accomplish better results than if 
each one were left to "paddle his own 
canoe." A community with discon- 
nected activities may be termed a 
variable approaching nothing as its 
limit, while on the other hand a com- 
munity with connected activities may 
be considered as a variable approach- 
ing as its limit inestimable results. 

We have now shown that it is 
necessary for progress that the in- 
terests of a community be centered 
and that the school is the most fitting 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



center. We shall now bring into our 
examination a few school communities 
of our own county — Lancaster; 

Fifteen years ago the schools of a 
certain township held debating con- 
tests, spelling bees, holiday entertain- 
ments, and singing classes as a prof- 
itable way in which to pass the long 
winter evenings. Such is the case no 
more. School houses may be used 
only six hours a day, five days a week, 
and twenty-eight weeks in a year. 
Some narrow-minded people in au- 
thority, rather than encourage such 
beneficial proceedings, have forbidden 
them simply because it would have 
cost fifteen or twenty dollars more a 
year for incidental expenses. They do 
not realize that by so doing they are 
shutting from their community that 
which would finally result in wonder- 
ful progress. As a result of such 
miserly, blind legislation our young 
people become impatient during the 
long winter evenings. They either 
spend their time loafing on the street 
corners of the nearby towns, or 
squander their lives in the village 
tavern or saloon. Of course, school 
taxes are low, but so are many of the 
young men and women in more re- 
spects than one. 

Unlike the township referred to 
above, we find East Donegal township 
with Maytown High School as its 
large center, every smaller school of 
the township being smaller centers 
gathering around this larger center, 
throwing open the doors of its schools 
to farmers' associations, entertain- 
ments, spelling bees, and anything 
upon which the community may decide. 
The High School Building not being 
large enough to accommodate the 



people on these occasions, the school 
board has furnished a large hall for 
such purposes. As a result Maytown 
is turning out more leaders than 
either Lancaster or Columbia, and its 
farmers are the best in the cCimty. 

Having considered what is being 
done along these lines in our im- 
mediate corhmunities, we will now dis- 
cuss what is possible along this line in 
any school community. We shall 
note such things as school libraries, 
school museums, and any activities 
which may interest the community at 
large. 

In many cities philanthropists and 
other benefactors have expended vast 
sums for the erection and furnishing of 
public libraries, with the idea that such 
advantages would uplift society beyond 
estimation. Not every community can 
afford an expensive library but every 
community can afiford to have in its 
school a collection of the best books 
and magazines on the market and 
allow free use of these to every in- 
dividual of that community. We need 
not use many pages to calculate its 
benefits and power of unification. The 
conclusion is easily reached. 

Who is so selfish or who is so 
narrow-minded, — if he wishes to be a 
good citizen — that would not gladly 
aid in helping to make collections for 
a school museum? In this feature of 
the school we would have a common 
interest and a common benefit. All 
would enjoy contributing to it, all 
would receive some benefit. 

Many communities would organize 
farmers' associations if there would be 
but little encouragement and a place 
for their meetings. The farmers help 
to pay the school taxes. Why not, then, 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



allow them some direct benefits? 
This would help to draw together that 
class of people which otherwise would 
be left to themselves. For this pur- 
pose no other place would be more 
fitting than the school. 

The school then, is the center 
around which should be gathered the 
readers, the antiquarians, and the fa - 
mers of the community. There are yet 
two other phases of this subject, viz., 
mothers' clubs, and the school as the 
community laboratory. These we 
wish to discuss, simply mentioning 
literary features and the like, such as 
the lyceum, singing school, entertain- 
ments, lectures, etc. 

In a few communities of our land 
mothers have hit upon the idea that to 
discuss among themselves problems 
relative to their work would be ex- 
ceedingly helpful. We cannot decide 
otherwise than that the school house 
is the place to hold such discussions. 
The only reason that we have so few 
mothers' clubs, is that nothing facili- 
tates such activities. 

Since the dawn of manual training in 
our schools, such implements of edu- 
cation as the school garden, the school 
shop, etc., in short, the experimental 



department of the school along nearly 
every line was introduced. In the 
Wfestern States when a farmer breaks 
his machines, in many cases he goes to 
the school where he can find tools to 
aid him in repairing them. The girls 
of many districts have bread-baking 
contests. The boys have corn-raising 
contests, and the school is always the 
place for their meetings. 

The next question that arises is who 
should facilitate such movements? 
The school authorities in the first place 
should see to it that the equipment 
is furnished, whatever encouragement 
is needed, every good teacher is glad 
to give. The movement needs a start. 
When once set in motion it will never 
cease except by great opposition. 

The socializing effects of such 
movements upon a community are 
almost inestimable. Homogeneity and 
heterogeneity will meet and fight their 
battle, strike their balance, and roll on 
the wheel of progress. False, pre- 
vailing ideas will be exploded and new 
ones will be installed into the minds 
of every individual until the c im- 
munity is bound together in sympitjiv 
by ties that will make it a mighty en- 
gine of progress. 



Contributions of Greece to Civilization 



Mamie A. Price 



Greece was considered in her time 
one of the greatest nations on the face 
of the globe. She attained the high- 
est place in culture among the ancient 
nations. 

Although Greece was considered a 
great nation^ she was defective in her 
g^overnment. Her physical features 
were such that divided the country into 
many small states. Each of these 
city states was independent and self 
governed like a modern nation. Local 
patriotism and strong city feeling 
among the. people of the city states 
prevented them from ever uniting to 
form a single nation. . Yet Greek 
civilization was. the fruit of the city 
state. The most significant feature 
of the imperial power of Greece 
through her city states, was the com- 
bination of material and intellectual re- 
sources. Literature and art had been 
carried to the greatest perfection. 
Literature had its roots in their polit- 
ical and social life. Each branch of 
the Hellenic race bore a characteristic 
part in its development. 

The lonians, the Dorians, and the 
Aeolians contributed their share and 
€ach found their appropriate work. 
The period between the Persian Wars 
and the Peloponnesian War, known as 
the Age of Pericles, was the "Golden 
Age of Greece," in which Athens con- 
tributed her part to civilization. Dur- 
ing this period Greece seems to have 
been at the height of her glory and 



during this age "she gave birth to 
more great men — poets, artists, states- 
men, and philosophers— than all the 
world besides has produced in any 
period of equal length." Among all 
the great men of this age, Pericles was 
the most prominent. He knew that to 
rule worthily, the people must be 
educated first politically by constitu- 
tional freedom, giving all classes of 
people equal rights in the government ; 
and next socially and intellectually, by 
an equal participation of all in social 
and intellectual enjoyments, all these 
were splendid and efficient educational 
agencies, which produce and maintain 
a standard of average intelligence and 
culture among the citizens of Greek 
cities that probably has never been at- 
tained among any other people on the 
earth. 

The Spartans under the Dorians 
educated almost wholly for gymnastic 
and military purposes. They gave us 
the ideal of a strongly developed body 
which, they acquired through their 
games and festivals. Some festivals 
were attended with athletic contests or 
recitations ; some were scenes of 
musical or dramatic contests ; and some 
were accompanied by rites of popular 
superstition. The art of oratory was 
developed by the democratic character 
of their institutions. In the courts 
every citizen was obliged to be his own 
advocate and defend his own case. 
Hence the high degree of perfection 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



attained by the Greeks in the art of 
oratory. Through their military taste 
historical composition was cultivated. 
The vast amount of practical wisdom' 
is shown by the great works of 
philosophy. 

Through all these agencies, Greece 
developed along literary lines. Her 
literature is of great importance not 
only because it was the earliest 
literature in Europe and that which 
had a masterful influence on all others, 
but because of the remains which 
prove it one of the greatest of all 
literatures. They possessed no model 
for guidance ; it is an original and a 
natural development. The period of 
decadence in Greek literature began 
with the extinction of free political life 
in the Greek cities. 

Art as it manifests itself in 
sculpture and architecture is another 
contribution to civilization. Sculp- 
ture was advanced by the custom of 
setting up images of the victors in 
their games. Particularly were the 
games promotive of sculpture, since 
they afforded the sculptor living mod- 
els for his art. Without the games we 
should never have had Greek sculpture 
so highly devoted. Almost all the 
masterpieces of Greek sculpture have 
perished but they are known to us 
mostly through the; Roman copies. 

Architecture was in three distinct 
styles; namely, Doric, Ionic, and 
Corinthian. The perfecting of these 



ordefy-- of architecture has been with 
one exception — the introduction of the 
arch — the most important event in the 
architectural history of the world. It 
was the religious feeling which created 
the noblest monument of the architec- 
tural genius of Hellas, Their atten- 
tion in architecture was almost ex- 
clusively confined to their temples. 
The buildings have now long been 
buried in ruins. The remains that have 
been unearthed give us a vision of the 
scene upon which the visitors looked 
in the days of the architectural glory 
of Greece. 

The freedom and power of Greece 
have for more than twenty centuries 
been annihilated ; her people have de- 
generated into slaves; her language 
into a barbarous jargon : her temples 
have been given to depredations of Ro- 
mans and Turks; but her intellectual 
empire is imperishable. Her power is 
indeed manifested at the bar; in the 
senate; in the field of battle; in the 
schools of philosophy. And who shall 
estimate her influence on private hap- 
piness? Many thousands have been 
made wiser, happier, and better by 
those pursuits in which she has 
taught mankind to engage. Many 
studies which took their rise from her 
have been wealth in poverty, liberty 
in bondage, health in sickness and 
society in solitude. Greece is "one of 
the few, the immortal names, that 
were not born to die." 



Ye Olde Schoole Dayes. 



'■;.: -Xh 



Delia G. Shank. 



■'^' 



Oh dear! I am so tired of school. 
I don't see why I must gfo anyway. 
The teacher was exceptionally cross to- 
day. He is just dreadful sometimes. 

This morning when he was about 
half done reading the Bible, he stopped 
and cried "Attention !" and there 
wasn't anyone making a noise. 

He had his spectacles sitting just on 
the tip of his nose and I was afraid 
they would fall off any minute, and I 
knew if they did he would be so much 
the more angry. 

Our spelling class was then called up 
and just think, missing only two words 
and then sending us to our seats and 
saying, "You people may take your 
seats and study your lesson." Then 
we had to stay in at recess and recite 
it. 

Poor little Sammy Newsole. When 
he w^ent up to class his shoes screeched 
so — and then the teacher said to him 
"Sammy Newsole, you walk more 
quietly." But the poor fellow could 
not help it. 

The teacher himself did not seem to 
be very much excited. He walked up 
and down through the room and at 
times the whole building would shake. 
But Sammy had to walk on tip-toes. 

Well, after dinner we sang and I 
wonder how he expected us to follow 
him and keep good time. Sometimes 
he went so fast, just like a streak of 
lightning that we could hardly get our 
breath — at other times, almost as slow 
as our old horse walks. 

His long arms swung from ceiling 



to floor, then across, and every; once 
in a while he would say, "Louder! Nokv 
slower." 

I could not see much use in that. It 
was a wonder he wasn't afraid of 
striking his hands against the ceiling 
some time and hurting them very 
badly. ; 

Oh my I how excited we were this 
afternoon when the visitors came; but 
I suppose no one was more excited than 
poor Josiah Walkover, for when he 
came down from class he stumbled 
over a bucket of coal and emptied it 
all over the floor. Then the teacher 
said, "Josiah Walkover, you pick up 
every coal or I will make" use of my 
stick." 

Poor Josiah! he was so scared that 
in about three minutes he had therri all 
picked up. I think it was real mean to 
scare him so. 

Then the visitors asked us to sing 
and I suppose the teacher thought he 
would show them what we could do 
as our school was counted one of the 
best for singing around here. 

The teacher seemed to use all the 
different arm movements; and just 
think those visitors sat there and put 
their handkerchiefs in front of their 
faces and laughed. The teacher didn't 
see it but we did and we thought it was 
a shame after singing the way we did. 

After we were done singing, one of 
the vi'^itors was trying to make a 
speech and said the school had im- 
pressed him very much that afternoon. 
He did not say how, but I guess I 
know. 




EDITORIAL BOARD. 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, '11, Editor in-Chief 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 



Obville Z. Becker, '15 School Notes 

Nora L. Kkbeh, '11 Homerian News 

Mary Scheaffek, '13: K. L. S. News 

Leah Sheaffer, '09 Alumni Notes 



C. L. Martin, '13 Exchanges 

J. D. Reber, '14 Bus. Mgr. 

A. L. Reber, '13 Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Daisy P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



Our College Times is publishel monthly during the Academic year by Elizabethtown College. 

Arrearage on subscription to this paper is charged. 

Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates :— Fifty cen,ts per year ; ten cents per copy ; five years for |2.00. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Ehzabethtown Postoffice. 



The Fully Unfolded Life. 

There is hardly a human being- who 
does not have some value placed on 
know^ledge of some kind or other. 
The savage and the barbarian in their 
various occupations are even skilled 
along certain lines to a greater degree 
of perfection than the civilized and 
the enlightened man; on the other 
hand, many of the accomplishments of 
the educated man have no charm w^hat- 
ever for- the savage. We also believe 
that there are many men and women 
who have a premium placed on know- 



ledge but do not actually possess the 
knowledge they desire. This class 
again divides itself into those who are 
striving to attain that which they desire 
and those who are unwilling or in- 
different with respect to paying the 
price for it. Every one of the former 
class will, if he be sincere in his efforts, 
havd a claim to a part of the great 
treasure of knowledge. But, to live 
the complete life, the fully unfolded 
life, one must not only set a premium 
on knowledge, not only aim to possess 
a certain portion of knowledge, but 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



also be openminded for more. The 
man who was once a sincere student 
will always be a student ; as he sur- 
mounts the rocks of difficulty his views 
will be more extensive, his ideals high- 
er; the finite once aroused will eter- 
nally strive to know the Infinite. 

Here, then, we see that there must 
be an awakening from our state of 
lethargy. We must realize that we are 
created for a purpose and that we can 
not reach the design of our creation 
without a knowledge of nature, man, 
and God. We look with respect to 
the man who walks through the fields 
and woods and sees nature in all its 
beauty ; who enters the groves and 
penetrates the forests and catches the 
music of birds, insects, and babbling 
brooks ; who looks at the snow-capped 
mountain and the thundering cataract 
and sees there a reflection of the sub- 
limity and power of God. O how we 
love him who, though alone with na- 
ture, is never lonely ! Then, too, we 
all admire the man who has a soul that 
sees into the depths of human nature ; 
the man who sees the intricacies of 
right living; and who knows when and 
how to speak the words of hope and 
cheer. Again, did you ever notice the 
respect shown to those who live a life 
of peace and holiness? What does it 
all mean? Such appreciation in the 
hearts of men is nothing less than the 
outward stamp of value placed on 
knowledge as it manifests itself in 
others. He who has aimed at the ac- 
quisition of such qualities has entered 
upon real life, for we can never hope 
to attain true manhood unless our 
thoughts are centered upon God's cre- 
ation and God's Word. We have not 
truly valued knowledge unless we see 



the reflection of God in the truths of 
Nature, the image of God in the right- 
eous man, and the will of God in the 
Bible. 

At this point it must be observed, 
however, that there are many people 
who value knowledge but who possess 
practically none at all. Then, too, 
there are many who think they possess 
some knowledge and at the same time 
are ignorant of God and his will. This 
is an absolute contradiction. The 
student who does not recognize God in 
Nature, in the human organism, and 
in his Word, does not possess know- 
ledge in the true sense of the word. 
The test of possession is profession ; 
consequently, he does not live the 
God-fearing life does not possess a true 
knowledge of nature, man, or the Bible, 
for God has unmistakably revealed 
himself in each. 

To obtain this knowledge is incum- 
bent upon every individual. We can 
appreciate life only in proportion to 
our right conception of God as revealed 
in Nature and in his Word. Know- 
ledge does not come by spurts and 
jerks, but is a gradual awakening. It 
is this very fact that brings discourage- 
ment to so many students, but it is 
needless. We are strengthened only 
by overcoming difficulties, and thus we 
see that those who have smooth sail-i 
ing are never in a position to endure 
the wild waves of a rough sea. Young 
man, if you have to struggle to get 
through College, be thankful for that 
opportunity to meet life as you will 
find it after your college days. Capture 
the arsenal of knowledge while in 
school and when you try to stand alone 
you will be able to withstand a siege. 
Remember that without a struggle you 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



are but a weakling, and that without 
a clear title to knowledge you 
can profess little before a wise genera- 
tion. 

Just as there are those who value 
knowledge and do not possess any, so 
there are those who possess some — 
yes all they need. They form a large 
part of our population and will go a 
mile to hear a Punch and Judy show 
but turn a deaf ear to a lecture by 
Jacob Riis next door. They have 
reached their ideals ; they can do what 
their fathers could do, and much more 
than their grandfathers in a shorter 
time. In short, they are not open- 
minded for more knowledge. 

Any person who has reached his 
ideal, or thinks he has, is to be pitied. 
Ideals should grow as we develop and 
they will be enlarged and elevated if 
we grow properly. The man who is 
beginning to see some of the wonderful 
truths of Nature will ever have a de- 
sire to know more of them. He will 
be like a tree that strikes its roots into 
a rich, vein of earth. He who can 
catch the cadence in the songs of the 
birds ; the soothing melody in the sigh- 
ing of the breezes ; the harmony in the 
tones of the cricket, katydid, and 
beetle on a summer evening; the 
rhythmical pulse of the mountain 
stream warbling its way over its rocky 
bed; and the music of the tadpole 
tenor accompanied by the , bull-frog 
bass ; he who hears these, his life is 
unfolding in all its beauty. 

Then, too, the student of sociology 
in his great study of man must ever 
be on the alert, be op.enminded, so that 
he may see life with its d^ily changes. 
Methods of yesterday will prove futile 



in the future. Life is no constant 
thing, but an ever changing reality 
and consequently, the man who would 
cope with the problems of life must be 
openminded and not headstrong. We 
must learn that to live rightly we must 
be awake to the relation we bear to our 
fellowmen. It is because we see some 
men giving their lives for the benefit 
of others that we respect them. They 
have lifted themselves above the plane 
of selfishness and have entered upon 
the altruistic plane of life ; he who 
has not done this is not truly educated 
and needs to have his conception of 
life changed. 

But above all men, that man is edu- 
cated who has a knowledge of God and 
whose soul is continually yearning for 
a closer walk with his Creator. The 
ideals of a Scripturally-intelligent man 
will never be realized in this life for to 
him true living is a pressing on in the 
path of love and duty. We again say 
that the man who has reached his ideal 
of what he thinks a Christian ought to 
be is one to be pitied, for he is but a 
step from fanaticism, — yes perhaps 
from apostasy, simply because his hand 
does not clasp that of the Divine. 
Knowledge is power only when it is 
applied in getting a broader vision. 
The greatest blessing that comes to 
man is the capacity to appreciate life ; 
and we can appreciate life only as we 
perceive the immanency of God in 
everyth,ing. Therefore, let us value 
knowledge ; strive eagerly to have a 
goodly portion of it; and what is far 
better, let us during our lives be open- 
minded for a clearer view of God in 
his creation and in his blessed Word. 




s 


















t 



L 




This term will soon be drawing to 
a close with all school work progress- 
ing nicely and it is hoped the beauti- 
ful spring weather we are now enjoy- 
ing will not put a damper on this prog- 
ress by bringing with it a number of 
cases of spring fever. 

The prospects for the enrollment of 
next term are exceptionally fine. Al- 
most all the old students will be back 
for the spring term, and also a num- 
ber of new ones, as well as public ■ 
school teachers some of whom will 
have to be provided with lodging in 
town as all the rooms at school will 
be filled. We are glad for this splendid 
growth of the school during this last 
year. 

On the eve of February the thir- 
teenth, Hon. H. Frank^Eshleman of 
Lancaster gave the fifth lecture of the 
College Course on the "German-Swiss 
Religious Foundation and Background 
of Lancaster County." College Hill 
never heard a lecture containing more 
data than this one. It was also on a 
subject of such great interest to those 
of loyal German and Swiss ancestry. 
The subject was ' beautifully and ex- 



tensively discussed and met with 
warm approval. 

The series of basket ball-games be- 
tween the Seniors and Juniors is 
finished, resulting in four victories for 
the Juniors. The last game played 
resulted in a score of 26 to 11 in favor 
of the Juniors. 



Juniors 




Seniors 


Geyer 


Center 


Diehm 


Hershey 


Guard 


Martin 


Coble 


Guard 


Rose 


Garber 


Forward 


Herr 


Becker 


Forward 


Reber 



The evening of February the seventh 
saw the "great" basket ball game of 
the season between the second teams 
of the Day and Boarding students. 
Although it was started as a basket 
ball game, it at various times changed 
into a marble game, peartut race, and 
a floor cleaning contest and resulted 
in the sensational score of 15 to i in 
favor of the boarding students. 



Day 




Boarding 


Engle 


Center 


Eberly 


Root 


Guard 


Shelly 


R. Martin 


Guard 


Royer 


R'. Becker 


Forward 


Brandt 


Falkenstein 


Forward 


' Swope 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Dr. Reber in Educational Classics: 
"Did the Amazons mentioned by Plato 
in The Republic live along the Amazon 
River in South America?" 

Miss R. Sheaffer: "Yes, sure they 
did." 

Warning to Mr. E. : "Do not write 
letters to "Dear Ella" and then because 
the wording of the letter does not suit 
you, tear it and throw it on the street, 
for College boys will find you out. The 
theme discussed, the alliteration, and 
the beautiful combination of words 
have made it a fine addition to the Col- 
lege museum." 

Mr. Lineaweaver has adopted the 
plan of attending Sunday morning 
religious services in town during the 
evening. , 

Mr. Christman a former student and 
member of the class of 1912 visited the 
College several times this year thus 
far. 

There also was a basket ball game 
between the two hall teams and the 
one team "nut it all over" the other 
team and — that is all. 

On January twenty-ninth the boiler 
room suf'denly became a center of at- 
traction for the boiler took a day off 
and we were left to enjoy all the 
beauties of a cold winter day without 
its aid. Through the co-operation of 
the boys it was repaired during the 
next night and the doctor was again 
cheated. 

If Ruth Land — is, is Elizabeth M — 
yer — ? 

It is certainly kind of one of the 
musicians of the school to ofifer to play 
"Dixie" for Miss Elizabeth Kline when 
discouraged. 



College Prayer Wieek ending on 
January the thirtieth, was observed at 
Elizabethtown College on that day by 
fitting exercises in which much thank- 
fulness and gratitude to the school for 
its help, was expressed by the students 
with the best wishes and prayers of 
all for its continued advancement. 

If your letters weigh too much follow 
Miss Kable's plan and send them by 
parcel post. 

St. Valentine's Day affected the Col- 
lege mail somewhat but not as much 
as usual. 

Although Mr. Kreider is afraid of 
ghosts yet the ghosts in the Conewago 
Hills do not hinder his weekly visits 
to Beverly. 

Mr. L. in bed, on receiving a hard 
blow across his face from his room- 
mate Mr. Hershey, wakened him and 
on inquiring the cause received the 
following answer: "O I thought I was 
driving pigs." 

Prof. Meyer was missing a few days 
but he is back again. 

Prof. Schlosser started a series of 
revival meetings in the Lancaster 
Church of the Brethren on February 
the ninth. The meetings are well at- 
tended ; six have stood for Christ at 
present writing. 

Although Harvard University gives 
the A. M. degree without a knowledge 
of the Greek alphabet yet it is an es- 
sential part here before receiving the 
B. H'. degree. Certifying to its stan- 
dard we may state that Mr. Rose re- 
ceived his B. H. degree recently. 

Who says: "Now Percy?" Ask 
him for particulars. 

Mr. Neff on a windy day: "This 
wind is certainly fine to take the dan- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



druff out of my hair. It's about all 
out already." 

Gentlemen, when it is cold and 
windy on top of "College Hill" don't 
growl but follow our optimistic Bull 
Moose party leader's example. ' 

Student to Mr. D. : "Why is your 
1913 class pin in Palmyra instead of 
in Elizabethtown. 

Mr. D. : "Oh ! Because- Maybe- 
Huh — ^^'hat did you say?" 



Class Social. 

A very novel and interesting affair 
occurred on College Hill on Saturday 
evening, February 22, when the Senior 
Class entertained the school in a body. 
The program of the evening began at 
7.45 and closed about 10.30. The even- 
ing was most pleasantly spent in chat- 
ting, listening, thinking and eating. 
The aim of all social events offered to 
the students here is to entertain edu- 
cationally, and this ideal was well 
carried out by this notable class of 
young men and women. 

The first part of the evening was 
spent in Music Hall, in arranging part- 
ners, such personages being present as 
Enoch Arden and Annie, Romeo and 
Juliet, Erick and Elizabeth, and others 
of equal literary, historic and mytho- 
logical fame. 

The amusements were of a very high 
order, being both artistic and literary, 
as well as scientific. Two musical con- 
tests were held, the successful partici- 
pants being tendered prizes in the 
form of George's hatchet and Wash- 
ington's hat. , 

Perhaps the most interesting feature 
was a "quiz" conducted by Prof. Har- 
ley. This was not only interesting and 



amusing, but instructive as well. 

After a change of partners, among 
some at least, all were asked to repair 
to the Library. The room was very 
neatly and artistically arranged with 
tables, each bearing a green plant and 
cherries. The entire company was 
seated around these tables in groups of 
four and five. In keeping with the 
day the favors of the evening were a 
hatchet and a red, white, and blue bow. 
Some of the ladies were very much 
elated over the fact that they had sev- 
eral "dates" and two "beaux." 

In a most pleasing and graceful man- 
ner the class served the refreshments 
consisting of ice cream and cake, bretz- 
els, stuflfed dates, and cofifee. One of 
the most attractive things of the even- 
ing was a large chocolate cake decora- 
ted with a hatchet and cherries, the 
same having been baked by the mother 
of Mr. Martin, president of the class. 

While the refreshments were being 
enjoyed the class rendered a short pro- 
gram as follows : Vocal Solo, C. L. 
Martin; Recitation, Ruth Landis; 
Piano Solo, Carrie Dennis ; Paper, 
"George Washington." Mary SchaefTer. 

Following the program. Mr. Waltz, 
Prof. Harley and Prof. Meyer gave 
toasts and the social was at an end. 

Everybody present enjoyed the kind- 
ness of the class to the fullest extent 
and expressed themselves as having 
had a very pleasant time. This class 
should be highly commended for the 
manner in which they conducted the 
social, for the appropriate decorations, 
and for the high order of literary enter 
tainment which they ofifered. 

The social committee surely have 
had their burdens lightened by the ef- 
forts of our noble boys and girls. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



This Senior Class has set an. ideal 
which other classes wijl do well to 
emulate. 

Then here's to the maidens of 1913 
The girls who are skilled and true, 

Who worked so long and served so 
well, 
And displayed the good they can do. 

And here's to the youths of 1913 
Brave and trustworthy sons, 

And may they strive to attune their 
lives, 
To the virtues of Washington. 



K. L. S. News 



On January 31, the Keystone 
Society met in regular literary session. 
The new officers were inaugurated and 
the president then gave his inaugural 
address. 

The following program was then 
rendered. 

Music — Chorus of Girls. 
Biography of Senator A. J. Beveridge 

G. C. Neff 

Debate — Resolved, that the presi- 
dent and the senators of the United 
States should be elected by the direct 
vote of the people. 

The affirmative speakers were Ella 
Ebersole and A. L. Reber; the 
negative, Lydia Miller and J. D. 
Reber. The judges decided in 
favor of the affirmative. 
Music — German Quartette. 
Select Reading— "The Photograph" 

Laban Wenger 
Literary Echo — Rebecca Sheaffer. 

The society met in executive ses- 
sion, February, 7. In the business 
session two amendments were passed 
upon and added to the constitution. A 



program was then rendered as follows: 
Music — Piano Duet Mjss^s : Dennis 

and Shenk. 
Recitation — "No Room for Mother" 

Grace Moyer 
Description of the Vatican at Rome 
J. A. Bufifenmyer ' 

Impromptu Debate— Resolved, That 
Moses was a more faithful servant 
than David. Debated affirmatively by 
Sarah Replogle and negatively by 
Mary Schaeffer. The judges decided 

in favor of the affirmative. . 

Music — Female Quartette. 

On February 14, a literary pro- 
gram was rendered as follows : 
Vocal Solo— "Herod's Vision" 

C. L. Martin 
Essay — "The Duty of Punctuality" 

Mamie Price 
Recitation — "Curfew Shall not Ring 

To-night Gertrude Kable 

Mixed Quartette — "Stars of Summer 

Night." 

Debate — Resolved, That four years 
spent in travel would be more bene- 
ficial to a young person, than an equal 
time spent in College. This question 
was debated affirmatively by Anna 
Schwenk and John Kuhns, and nega- 
tively by Rhoda Miller and Elam Zug. 

The judges decided in favor of the 
negative. 

Declamation — "The Southern Soldier" 

Harry Royer 

Vocal Solo— "Come Where the Blue 
Bells Ring." Elsie Stayer 

Literary Echo — Edna Brubaker (Sub- 
stitute for Editor). 

Homerian News 
Our society is steadily moving on- 
ward. At a recent private meeting 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



three of our old students, H. H. Nye, 
C. L. Martin, and J. D. Reber were 
elected as active members. The 
private meetings are becoming very 
interesting fsince the constitution is 
being carried out more, strictly. 

On the evening of February 21, a 
public Washington and Lincoln pro- 
gram was rendered in an .^excellent 
manner. Prof. Myer's illustrated ad- 
dress on the "Life of Washington" 
thrilled the audience with patriotism. 
The address was much appreciated. 
Addresses of this nature are not only 
entertaining but also instructive in 
every sense of the word. The follow- 
ing features constituted the program : 
Prayer Chaplain 

Piano Solo — Sonata Pathetique Leah 

Sheaffer , 

Speaker's Address Ruth Stayer 

Reading — Washington and Lincoln 

Gertrude Miller 

Oration— Abraham Lincoln Lillian 

Falkenstein. 
Address— Life of Washington Prof. 

J. G. Myer. 



When earth's last picture is painted, 

And the tubes are all twisted and 
dried ; 
When the oldest colors have faded. 

And the youngest critic has died 
We shall rest — and— faith, we shall 
need it, 

Lie down for an eon or two 
Till the Master of all Good Workmen 

shall set us to work anew. 

And those that were good shall be 
happy, 
They shall sit in a golden chair, 
They shall splash at a ten league can- 
vas 
With brushes of comet's hair. 
They shall find real saints to draw 
from, 
Magdalene, Peter, and Paul. 
They shall work for an age at a sitting 
And never get tired at all! 

Only the Master shall praise us, 

And only the Master shall blame; 
And no one shall work for money, 

And no one shall work for fame ; 
But each for the joy of the working. 

And each to his separate star 
Shall draw the Thing as he sees it 

For the God of Things as They are. 

—Kipling. 




Spring Term is approaching and 
with the flight of the Winter Term 
come numerous appHcations for rooms 
for th,e coming session. Among these 
applicants we note several Alumni. 
This is very encouraging and adds in- 
spiration to the work on the hill. 
Among those who have already ap- 
plied for entrance in the Spring are 
Agnes M. Ryan, Florence Miller, Nora 
Reber, and Irene Sheetz. Several 
others are expected. The last two 
named expect to finish the Pedagog- 
ical Course in June. 

The following from the Harrisburg 
Telegraph may be of interest — "The 
engagement of Miss Mary E. Hertz- 
ler, of Elizabethtown, and Milligan C. 
Kilpatrick was announced at a pretty 
Valentine party at Miss Hertzler's 
home. Miss Hertzler is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Hertzler of 
Elizabethtown and a teacher of the 
Woodward school building, this city. 
Mr. Kilpatrick is teacher at State Col- 
lege in the department of animal hus- 



bandry. The wedding will be an 
event of the summer." In the name of 
the Alumni Association of Elizabeth- 
town we extend to these young people 
our heartiest congratulations. 

Prof. Schlosser, 'ii, is at present 
holding a series of meetings at Lan- 
caster. He goes back and forth each 
day, teaching during the day and 
preaching in the evening. Be reports 
good interest in the meetings. Prof. 
Schlosser has become quite an able 
and enthusiastic speaker as is proved 
by the frequent calls he receives. He 
has recently been appointed to assume 
charge of the Stevens Hill Ch.urch 
near Elizabethtown. 

Mr. John Miller, '05, of Lititz is the 
new president of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation. Any one desiring any in- 
formation can obtain it from him or 
fromi Irene Wise, '11, of Elizabethtown, 
who is the Corresponding Secretary. 

The class of 1913 is an energetic one 
and bids fair to add a number of en- 
thusiastic workers to our unmber. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



Each year brings new members into the 
Alumni Association. Each year the 
assets of the school become larger, 
for loyal Alumni are the most valuable 
assets of any school. The College 
needs money. Some of her Alumni are 
endowed with talents for financial 
success. Be loyal, she needs students. 
Some of her graduates are shining 
lights and are shedding forth her 
light. Send students. She needs en- 
couragement. Some of her sons and 
daughters are eloquent speakers. Let 
a good word fall for her whenever pos- 
sible. She needs loyal Alumni, she 
has them, but she needs them not 
only in word, but in deed and truth. 
What are we doing for our Alma 
Mater? Are we walking advertis- 
ments for the school? Does the world 



know that we are Alumni of E'town 
College? Are we making the world 
better for having been within her 
walls? 

Prof. J. G. Meyer. 05, has recently 
purchased the Stauffer cottage on Col- 
lege Avenue. He with his family, wiil 
occupy it before the beginning of the 
Spring Term. We all rejoice with 
Prof, and Mrs. Meyer in that they will 
now enjoy the comforts of their own 
home, but we are loathe to lose them. 
We will miss them on the hall and in 
the dining room and especially so be- 
cause all of us have fallen in love 
with Mildred. 

March is here— only four months 
till Commencement. The Executive 
Committee should be busy by this time. 



Resolutions of Sympathy 



Whereas, God in His infinite wisdom 
has seen fit to remove from his earthly 
home Robert Lincoln, son of our 
worthy trustee, J. W. G. Hershey, and 
the brother of one of our fellow 
studtnts, be it 

Resolved, That we the faculty and 
the student body of Elizabethtown 
College express our sincere sympathy 
to the family and relatives in their 
sorrow, and commend them to our 



Heavenly Father who doeth all things 
well. 

Resolved, That a copy of these reso- 
lutions be sent to the bereaved family 
and that they be published in the Col- 
lege Times and in the Lititz Express. 

L Z. Hackman 
J. S. Harley 
Ru.th Landiis 

Committee 




We have attempted up to this time 
to handle the exchange department of 
this paper according to our ideal. We 
however, do not say that our ideal is 
the only, neither would we be under- 
stood that it is the best ideal. Still 
we would not be very stable if we had 
no faith in our ideas of what a good 
exchange department should be. 

In the first place the purpose of 
having an exchange department is, or 
at least should be "to see ourselves as 
others see us." This purpose should 
be our first guide in determining the 
nature of the exchange department. 
We usually judge the purpose by the 
article, and we find portrayed in some 
of our exchanges purposes like these. 
Some write articles because they have 
been appointed to the task ; some want 
to appear "funny" and so they copy 
"funny things" ; others like to receive 
privileges and grant special favors and 
comments, so they comment only on 
the papers of the schools that seem to 
strike their fancy, newspapers on the 
staiTs of which are some of their 
personal friends ; once in a great while 
we find a real good exchange depart- 
ment. 



In the good exchange department we 
find portrayed the true purpose of com- 
ment. The papers are weighed and 
viewed from every standpoint. When 
they are worthy of praise they receive 
praise ; when they have missed the 
mark, they are frankly told. A good 
exchange department excludes trashy, 
nonsensical, and worthless material. 
It does the thing as though, it meant 
business. 

The Conwayan. We believe that 
there always should be a material re- 
cognition of the receipt of a paper. The 
long recognition paragraph could thus 
well be omitted. We should further re- 
frain from copying from other papers. 
In general the exchange department of 
this paper is handled in a fair manner. 
The literary department shows careful 
work. 

The exchange department of th^ 
Comenian is short and good. The 
paper has few advertisements and 
presents a neat appearance. The ar- 
ticle by Walter Wesenberg is a good 
one. 

The first sixteen pages of the 
Tatler would make a good paper by 
themselves. The exchange depart- 
ment would be better if the acknowl- 
edgments were omitted. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



We should not fail to recognize the 
neatness of the Muhlenberg. The first 
page of the exchange department is 
ideal, the rest seems more like ballast 
than anything else. A few pictures 
now and then make the paper interest- 
ing. The literary department of this 
paper is always up to the standard. 

The Tech Tatler gives us nine pages 
of humor (?) and ten pages of other 
things not very solid. Give us a few 
stories and essays. Your arrangement 
and appearance is very good, what you 
need is balance and taste in other re- 



spects. 

We like the editorial of the 
exchange department of the Perki- 
omenite. That edi*- )r has his eyes 
open. In other respects the paper 
needs better arrangement. A little 
less news and a few more stories would 
give the paper better balance. 

Orange and Black has the most 
beautiful cover we have seen so far. 
Its appearance throughout is good. It 
seems to be well balanced. It is the 
best high school paper on our list this 
month. 



Fresh and Smoked Meats 

S. M. RENSEL 

S. Market St. 0pp. Exchange Bank 

Try Mother's Bread— Home-Made. None 
Better, Fernr as Good. 

O. H. BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTO'WN 



The baker who knows how. Phone or drop a postal 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



CENTRAL 



MEAT 



MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



H. H. GOOD 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 



The Pratt 
Teachers' Agency 



70 Fifth Aveune 
Ne-HT York 



R. H. SHISSLER. 



Keoeivps mils at nil seasone for colieee 
and normal graduates, specialists and 
other teachers in colleges, public and 
private schools in all parts of the coun- 
try. 

Advises parents about schools. 

■WM. O. PRATT, Manager 



Plain Suits, Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats. 

GANSMASM'S 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orang'i Sts., Lancaster, Pa. 

Elizabethtown Dental 
Parlors 

Office Closed Thursday 
and Friday 

S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 

Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



26 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



H 



B 



M 



jiyi»iioBii»"miiii»iiiiBiiii:Btiiniin!inaiii!B!iiW''iBiiiii^ 

College Jewelry of the BeMerSorl g 

G. WmrREISNER 

Manufacturing 
Jeweler 

Class Pins and Rings Prize Cups 

Fraternity Jewelry Medals 

120 East Chestnut Street. 
LANCASTER, PA. 

iiiiigiiiiieiiii@iiiiisiiiiiBiiiii@iii!BiiiiiPira!i"Br'""Biiiiniraiiii 



* 

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Heati]i§ and 

Plumbing 



I ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

tTfutMTMtMTr 
W'l A • A 4 




H. M, Muth 



F. T. Muth 



MUTH BROS. 



Dealers in 



LUMBER^ 

Also all kinds of building material 
and mill work, Slate and Cement, 
Wheeler Screens, Fertilizer, Patent 
Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board, etc. 

COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. 

We also aim to give you a square 
deal that will merit your trade and 
friendship. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



* 
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DENTIST 

GEO. K. KERSEY 
Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



WE DO IT RIGHT. 



Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES ^ SON 



F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
RtPAIR WORK .... 

Horseshoeing a Specialty. 

N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 



J. QRQFF &. SOHB 

eat Market 



NORTH MARK£T ST. 



asTy 



— if you want to. Yes, in any posi- 
tion, any pocket. 

Boys: carry the Parker Jack Knife 
Pen in your trousers pocket along 
with your keys. 

Girls: carry it in the pocket of 
your white blouse. 

Flay football with it, — basketball, 
tennis, hockey. It's on the job the 
minute you want to write, without 
leaving a pinhead spot of ink any- 
where it has been carried. 

Write? Just im gine a pen of 
c'iss that melts to ink as you s\Az it 
across paper! That's the way it writes. 

Price $2.50 up. Get one on trial. 
Take it back any time within 10 
days if you're not tickled to death 
v/-tS it. We au'.horize d-alcr to re- 
fund. If your dealer doesn't c^rry 
1 arkers, write us for catalog loday. 

PARKER PEN COMPANY 
Miil St., JanesviJe, Wis. 






Jack \ivAfe Safety 

FOlHmiH PEN 



For sale at the Bookroom. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



27 



1900 



1912 



IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 



SEVEN REASONS : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Ej^uipment. 

For further particulars, address 

Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN PA. 



28 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-Made Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 



North East Corner Centre Square, 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



JACOtS FISHER 
Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 

With you for 31 years. That'* All 



E. H. LEHM 
COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR. 

Telephone 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Bell and Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 

46 E. King St., Lancaster, Pa. 

CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Young 

BMZABETHTOWN, - PBNNA. 

W. R. Ashenfelter | 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied with 
Fancy Cakes at short notice. 



S. MARKET ST., 



:thtown, pa. 



FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
"Will convince. Work £:uaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown. Pa. 



Ind. Phone 



Hours 8 to 6 



DR. JEROME G. HESS 
DENTIST 



Hertzler Bldg. 
Elizabethtown Pa. 




Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 

Choice Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees, Fresh Country Butter and Eggi 

Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Penna 



We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 



Y. M. C. A. Bldg., 



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Dealer in 

ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



^ Elizabotlitown, 



Penna. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 29 

THE "ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD" 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 



/T 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



=^ 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
Shipped every Wednesday 



ELIZABETHTOAVN, 



PBNNA. 



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Sporting Goods 



Post Cards 



Agent for all periodicals. 

Pocket cutlery, toys, novelties, etc. 

Fine confections. 

H. K. Dorsheimer 

Bell 'Phone 38-3 
On the Square, Elizabethtown. Pa. 



School Supplies 



Stationery 



John A. Fisher 



BARBER 



Centre Square, 



Elizabeth to-OT^n, Pa. 



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COLUMBIAN AND RED CROSS J 

I Heaters and Ranges | 

The Finest Lines Made a 



Jos. H. Rider &. Son 

J ELIZABETHTOWN, - "^^ i 




D. B. KLINE 

CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



GEO. A. FISHER 

HARDWARE 

Automobiles 
Phonographs and 
Records 
F. P. GAS PLANTS 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



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t ELIZA BETH TOWN 

t ROLLER MILLS 



J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. 
Manufacturer of Best Grades o 
FLOUR AND FEED 



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30 



I 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of if our Patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 



Tti« Bee Hive Store 



6outh Market an<r*BaiNbriiLfl« 6tre«te, EJtz«b«ihtowfl, Pa. 
Dry (xOodB.Notions, Shoes, Carpets, Draperies and an Up-to-Date 
Gent's ^nd Ladies' Furnishings 

''SOMETHING NEW EVERY DAY" 



line of 




The Duplex 

Recommends Literary 
and Commercial teachers 
Secretaries and Account- 
ants. Schools for sale. 
Circurlars free. Write 
for further information. 
Eliza bethtown, Pa. 



Lunches 



Telephones. 



B. W. MIE«6E 

Baker and Confectioner 

123 N. Queen St. 

LANCASTER, PA. 



Ice Cream 



Water Ice 



D. G. 



Goal 



Grain, Flour, 
Seeds, Hay, 
and Fertilizer. 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, 



F«ed, 
Straw 



Fa. 



2 A farmer once to a certain age ^ 

« ;In the Lunch Room Business did en- ^ 

S gage. 

^ T'was Nissley. 

« Thousands of people now are fed, 

$ Pure, delicious, quick. Enough said. 

^ TRY NISSLEY 

^ 14-16 East Cheetnut Street 9 

J LANCASTER, PA. ^ 



j[ < < 1 1 ♦•♦<>♦•»#> ♦ ♦♦♦ I 'll' K ' < ■ € ■ < ■♦ ♦<" 

Ursinue College 

. COLLEGEVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 
V (24 miles from Philadelphia.) 

^ Organized and administered under the Group Sys- 

4» tem of Instruction, providing both liberal culture and 

^ special preparation for the various vocations, an 

♦ arrangement pretenting exceptional advantages for 

^ efficiency and economy All groups open to women 

4» as well as men Write for special bulletin and 

«i» descriptive pamphlat. 

^ A. Edv.in Keigwin D.D., President. 
Geo. Leslie Omwake, Pd.D., Vice-Pres. 



I 



»< »« '*' f 4» »^*» *4 »fH » e ' H ' »»<"l " I H 



I Spalding Sporting Goods f 



Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, 
Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic 
Shoes. Kodaks .and Cameras, de- 
veloping and finishing. 

H. B. H E R R 
S0-a2 West King Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦^^^♦♦♦0♦<»«^»^^4»♦4^♦4>♦4< 



iHinniiiHiiiiHiiiiniiiiHiiiiniiiiiBiiiiniiiiHiiiiiBiiiiiBiiiHiiiiiBiiiiniiiiHiiiMiiiwiaiiii^ 

IF ITS MUSIC OR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, WE HAVE IT! M 



•RirR Johnson Si Co. 



m 



MUSIC HALL 
16-18 West King Street, 

liiliHIinHlllKilHUUWHiHyniHiilHIIIIWUHIIIHiyaWiJHill^^ 



LANCASTER, PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



31 



«««4tA*««««4««««««««A««««««««#*#4U*4l4l*««4M(««««4l««*«A«4t««««ft««««« 



ail Orders Solicited for 



* 

3 



THE BOOK STORE 
I C. m. FALKENISTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. | 



(ntino anb 
Ibanging 

S B. DRACE 



/T 



ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 
Catalogues a Specialty- 
Si 1 W. Grant St., LANCASTER, PA. 



REBER WAGONS! 

•is the cry of man and horse. The 
horse says "It pulls so easy" and the 
man says "It rides so nice and lasts 
so long." So come my neighbor, get 
yourself such an outfit and be pleased 
yet more than that. 

REBER WAGON WORKS 
Centreport, Pa. 



s. 



GRAYBILL 



c 




==^ 



OLLEGE 



AIRY 



^: 



Fresh milk and cream daily. All milk 
tested forchildren; free from tuberculosis 
HOTELS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED 



J 



TAKE YOURo 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday mommg. 
Returns VVednesday and Friday afternoon. 

CALL AT 
RALPH GROSS SHAVING PARLOR 
Conducted on sanitary principles. 

Massaging a Specialty. 
Agency of First-Class Laundry. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



O. N. HEISEY |; 

Provisions, Groceries, CBi, Choice Candies ^ 

:^ HP:TSEY BITILDING elizabethtown, - VT. 



32 



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Elizabethtown Exchange 

Bank 



Transacts a general banking business, pays in- 
terest on time deposits, solicits your patronage 



OFFICERS 



A. G. HEISBY, Pres. 



ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres 



J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 



DIRECTORS 



A. G. Heisey Jos. G. Heisey B. H. Greider, H. J. Gisb 

Allen A. Coble Dr. H. K. Blough Henry E. Landis J. H. Buch 

Dr. A M. Kalbach Geo. D. Boggs E. E, Hernly 



lt******«**« ******************* 

I P. N. Kraybilll 



*i! 



Both 'Phones 



« Rkeems. - Penn'a t 

S Dealer in ^ 

J Groceries, Dry Goods, Notions, z 



Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 



^ Hardware, Paints, Oils, Turpen- J 



tine and Glass 



]j Oilcloth, Linoleums, Matting, Win- 
dow Shades and Strips 



Soliciting a Share of Your Business * 



jpiiiiiBiiiiiBiiiiiaiiiiisiiiiisiiiiieiiiiiiii:iii&iiii!giiiiisaiiiiiBiii!iEiiiiiHiiiii 

I Warner's 



■ 



are the only corsets that are en- 
dorsed so fully and strongly to us. 

Guaranteed to shape fashion- 
ably, to fit comfortably, and not 
to rust, break or tear. 

You connot say any more in 
favor of a corset excepting to give 
its price — 

$1.00 to $2.00 Per Pair 

If we could say just the things 
that we say about Warner's Rust- 
Proof Corsets, it would make 
any corset worth while ; but 
WARNER'S are the only corsets 
we can make this absolute state- 
ment regarding. 

Huntzberger-Winters Co. 

ELIZABETHTCWN, PA. 



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"It's not what we say we do; 
It's what we do." 

How often have you read the promises of men? 

How often have you paid the pena Ity afterwards? 

We often question the advisability of telling about 
the clothes we sell, for talk is cheap. However, there is' 
only one way to interest the man who doesn't know us 
and that is to advertise. So, we are forced to use this 
method of getting in touch with you. 

This advertisement is not going to say a single word 
about our clothes. Its only object is to invite you to 
visit our shop. When you arrive here we'll show you. 

Can we hope to see you soon? 

"FOLLOW THE ARROW" TO 

S. M. MYERS & CO. 

CLOTHIERS — FURNISHERS — HATTERS 
12 East King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Hertzler's Department Store 




Your needs supplied at satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, Groceries, Ready-to-Wear Clothing for Men 
and Women of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oilclotli 
Shoes, Etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-Measure 



CLOTHING 



International Tailoring Co., New York. 
American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chicago. 
Up-to-Date Samiples on Hand. 



Black Cat 
Hosiery 



ERTZLER BROS. & CO. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice. Pres. 



l: 



AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier 
U. S. DEPOSITORY 



Elizabelitown National Bank 

Capital Surplus and Profits $I57,000<.00 



General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid on special 
deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 





DIRECTORS 




W. S. Smith 


Elmer W. Strickler 


Peter n: Kiitt 


F. W. GrofE 


J. S. Risser 


B. U Geyer 


E. C. Ginder 


Amos G. Coble 


E. E. Coble 



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[ 



Carl Schlotzhauer 

The Students Official 
Photographer 



I 







Don't have your Pho- 
tos taken anywhere else 
or you will regret it. 

You are invited to vis- 
it our studio and notice 
the 1912 Photography, 
something new and differ- 
ent than you have ever 
seen before. 



a 



\ 






SPECIAL RATE TO STUDENTS 

163 N. Queen St. 

OPPOSITE HOTEL WHEATLAND 



Su^iliMf^piiiM^WltfiMMiMMIli 



We Ar« Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made to Order 

Plain 
Clothing 

In This Country 

When in Lancaster it will pay 
you to visit ours, tlie only 
Clothing Store in that city that 
has One Price to All and gives 
discounts to none. See us for 

MEN'S READY MADE AND 
MADE TO ORDER 

Clothing 

AND 

Furnishing 

YOUTH'S AND BOYS' 
CLOTHING 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Since 1854 at 

Centre Square, Next to City Hall 

LANCASTER, .PA. 




Q^TE/V;, 




A REVERIE 5 

THE MESSAGE OF A DREAM 6 

ROMAN CONTRIBUTION TO CIVILIZATION 7 

PLAIN LIVING AND HIGH THINKING 9 

MUSINGS ON LADY MACBETH 12 

EVERY-DAY HEROES 14 

BIBLE DEPARTMENT NOTES 15 

EDITORIALS 16 

APRIL FOOL 16 

SCHOOL NOTES 18 

THE MUSICALE 20 

K. L. S. NEWS 21 

HOMERIAN NEWS 21 

ALUMNI 23 

EXCHANGES 24 



(@ur Qlnlkg? Stm?0 



Vol. X 



ELIZABtfTHTOWN, Pa., ApRIL, 1918 



No. 7 



A Reverie 



In a house by the side of the mill stream wide 

Is a garret with treasures rare, 
And I am beguiled as a curious child 

To climb that attic stair. 
My little feet tread through the gloom in dread 

Of the ghosts which my fancy weaves 
'Neath the roof where the rain beats a dull refrain 

And the willow boughs lash the eaves. 

My sister scarce three, with innocent glee 

Joins me in the adventure bold. 
While we rummage and pry through journals piled high 

In an unused cradle old ; 
Then bend o'er a book in a cobwebbed nook 

Till we hear mother's hurrying feet, 
Who with unfeigned joy spies her girl and her boy 

Snug and safe in their dim retreat. 



'Tis a reverie only, by night winds lonely 

Borne back o'er the tide of the years; 
Then why should I wake and my sad heart ache 

And my pillow be wet with tears, 
When that mother has rest, and her gentle breast 

Is forever free from pain ; 
And that sister sleeps though the hurricane sweeps 

O'er her grave on a western plain. 

— Nescis. 



The Message of a Dream. 



Edna Brubaker 



It was to Elizabethtown College I 
came last year. Then my mother 
said, "You may go for one term and 
till then you will know whether you 
enjoy the work and I will also know 
whether I can do without you at home" 
After the first month was past I went 
home on a visit. This afforded me 
great pleasure as I had not been away 
from home for so long a time before. 
When Mother learned that I enjoyed 
the work she decided to let me come to 
Elizabethtown another term. 

All the while my vision of the worth 
of an education was growing larger, 
but I did not feel a great desire for 
an education until after the following 
experience. 

On a beautiful, calm winter night 
as I gazed meditatingly on the stars, 
I fell into a light slumber. Im- 
mediately an interpretation of the 
heavens in terms of the world appear- 
ed to me in a dream. 

I noticed three stars especially. I 
thought they represented persons 
wearing a star on their breasts. They 
had different degrees of brightness 
and as I observed them more closely, 
I noticed they were having a dis- 
cussion on their abilities and positions 
in the stellar world. 

CLARUS, the most dim, I first 
heard remark, "Well, I know I can- 
not amount to much in the world for 
I have no education and I think this 
is a good excuse for me not to do any 
thing but amuse myself." 



"Oh! no," said CLARIOR, "that 
is no excuse for you. It is the duty 
of each one to make the most of his op- 
portunities. You do not want to be 
like the man with the one talent. I 
know I am not the man with five 
talents but I want to be like the man 
with the two. I desire to use my 
talents and gain two others." 

CLARUS not yet convinced and in- 
clined to look on the dark side replied 
listlessly, "That may all be true but 
then I am older than you and there is 
no use beginning now. Every one 
knows my former mistakes." 

CLARISSIMUS, the brightest star 
could no longer hold his peace, "Why 
brother ! What is your purpose in 
speaking like that? Don't you know 
one is never too old to do good? I 
think I can sympathize with you in 
your position. I know I have a good 
education, a possession which indeed 
is enviable ; but then did you never 
know that there are two kinds of edu- 
cation, — the kind which one gets from 
books—" 

"Yes but what other kind?" in- 
quired CLARUS. 

"Why, the more important kind, that 
which you acquire, that which each 
individual gives himself," continued 
CLARISSIMUS. 

"Well, I declare, I always heard a 
man with no "book-learning" can't 
make anything out of himself, but you 
give me a glimmer of hope. I will go 
now and try to get your second kind of 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



education !" CLARL^S soberly replied. 

"Brother, you gave that man a clear 
view of his case pretty soon," added 
CLARIOR. "Now I would like to 
know why I myself cannot do more 
than I do at present. My father gave 
me much schooling and yet every one 
praises you so much and I know you 
merit it. but why do I not merit 
j)raise?" 

'■\\'ell. brother, you have stored that 
knowledge in your brain so long that 
the lock has become rusty but you be- 



gin to have Other's for your motto and 
I am sure you will succeed," advised 
CLARISSIMUS. 

"You go on shining and help us 
poor mortals to make better lives. 
I am sure your talk this evening has 
completely changed both my brother's 
and my future for the better," con- 
cluded CLARIOR. 

At this moment I awoke and after 
pondering over my dream, I applied it 
to mv life. 



Roman Contributions to Civilization 



Helen G. Oellig. 



In discussing Roman contributions 
to civilization we cannot bring to your 
notice wonderful productions in art 
and sculpture, nor much originality in 
architecture, nor a great many philos- 
ophers, nor a great amount of poetry, 
nor many records of history as we 
could of Greek contributions, for the 
foundation of Rome's greatness lies not 
in these things but in the system of 
government and the code of laws which 
she gave to posterity. 

Although the Romans borrowed the 
elements of art and architecture from 
the Greeks yet there is a distinctive 
style of architecture called Roman 
which varies from that of the Greek. 
However, the influence of Greek art is 
seen not Only in the decorations but in 
the massive structure of the Roman 



buildings. Without doubt the Romans 
perfected the arch and this is their 
chief contribution to art. But this, in 
itself, was a great step for it laid the 
foundation for a new style and became 
a great economic advantage in building. 
Another contribution of the Romans 
was their beautiful and rich language. 
It was through the medium of the Lat- 
in language that modern peoples were 
able to translate the rich treasures of 
Greek literature. The language of the 
Latin tribes which settled at Rome in 
early times spread over all Italy and 
through all the provinces and so be- 
came to a great extent the language of 
the common people and subsequently 
the literary language of the Romans. 
In the Middle Ages and even at the be- 
ginning of the Modern Era the Latin 



8 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



language was the language of all civil 
and ecclesiastical proceedings. As 
such, the service it has performed to 
the w^orld is great. The productions of 
Horace, Livy, and Cicero are full of 
thought and beauty of expression, and 
have a great influence on the youth of 
our modern times. These works, like 
all works of art, have lived and will live 
to bear their influence through suc- 
ceeding years. 

The Latin language is the foundation 
of the Spanish, Italian, and French lan- 
guages as they are spoken today. Many 
of our English words, also, are of Latin 
derivation. 

The Romans not only gave the Ital- 
ians, Spaniards, and Frenchmen their 
languages but the Romans are a part 
government which has had its in- 
of the foundation of these nationalities. 
It was the blending of the Romans and 
Teutons that gave these people their 
own peculiar personalities. Can we 
imagine what Europe would be like 
without the humorous, witty, and ver- 
satile Frenchman, the brave and head- 
strong Spaniard, and the dark-browed, 
revengeful Italian? 

But the greatest contribution of the 
Romans to civilization is their system 
of government and their code of laws. 
The fundamental idea of the Romans 
in government was the ruling of an 
entire unified state from a central city. 
So long as this central power remained 



there was little danger that Roman 
power would decline but when separa- 
tion began in the central government 
the whole structure was doomed. Ro- 
man contributions, then, to civilization 
along the line of government is the de- 
velopment of the municipal form of 
fluence on every modern town. 

The Romans developed a system of 
law which has found its place in all 
modern legal codes. Myers says, "Na- 
tions, like men have their missions. 
Rome's mission was to give laws to 
the world." The code of laws which 
was handed down by Rome and which 
has wielded it influence ever since is 
the Corpus Juris Civilis, or Body of 
Civil Law, compiled by Justinian in 
528 A. D. The body of Roman law 
thus preserved and handed down 
through the ages was the greatest con- 
tribution of the Latin intellect to civili- 
zation. It has exerted a profound in- 
fluence upon almost all of the systems 
of law of European countries and was 
the most precious legacy of the 
Romans to the world. 

These are the chief contributions of 
the Roman system to the progress of 
humanity. "While it is common, to 
talk of the fall of the Roman Empire, 
Rome is greater today in the perpe- 
tuity of her institutions than during the 
glorious days of Republic, or the mag- 
nificent rule of the Caesars." 



Plain Living and High Thinking. 



I. J. Kreider. 



Let us for one moment look at the 
meaning- of these great terms, "plain 
living" and "high thinking." We must 
necessarily have a firm background on 
which to paint a plain-living character 
and a high-thinking being. By plain 
living we mean a life that not merely 
exists but one that is active, lively, and 
vigorous and which at the same time is 
contented to be seen as it is — plain, 
simple, undisguised, sincere, and hon- 
est. And a high-thinking- person is 
one who has not only developed the 
faculty of thought but is also endued 
with the power that enables him to 
hitch his wagon to the stars or, in other 
words, one who always has lofty and 
noble ideals towards which to strive. 

These influences must travel hand in 
hand if nothing but the best results are 
desired. Genuine high thinking can 
not exist without having plain living 
as a foundation on which to erect its 
mighty pillars. It enables us to distin- 
guish truth from error, and to reject 
what is wrong after we have seen, read, 
or heard anything. We can never ex- 
aggerate the great importance of clear 
and correct thinking". We should, 
therefore, ever eat, drink, ^leep, walk, 
and exercise both body and mind to 
this end. Take away the thought from 
the life of a man and what have you 
left? Is not the thought of a man the 
very life of a man For "as a man 
thinketh in his heart so is he." Fill 
the head and heart of a plain-living 
young man with high and noble 



thoughts and I will show you a man 
who loves his fellow-men and one who 
is loyal to his native land. 

Our great country is just full of op- 
portunities the requirements of which 
none but independent thinkers and 
common sincere persons can properly 
meet. There is no reason in this 
twentieth century for only the select 
few to do the thinking. Books are so 
cheap that even the poorest can have 
access to the channels of thought. 
Books, however, should be 'used only 
as a means to set the mind in motion 
to search out the boundless realms of 
truth. It behooves us to work toward 
this end and to favor our age with new 
thoughts and new ideas, and by so do- 
ing we may raise the world step by step 
in the scale of civilization and intelli- 
gence. Men may do it today for men 
have done it in the past. But of the 
thousands and millions who have lived 
and died comparatively few are re- 
membered. Among those few we have 
some who, through simple lives and 
high thinking, have become great lead- 
ers, educators, reformers, philosophers, 
orators, statesmen, and poets. These 
men of whom we are about to speak 
are those who had not merely obtained 
their knowledge from books but were 
able to see a beauty and a living spirit 
in nature itself. 

Bryant said, "The groves were God's 
first temples." Noah on coming from 
the Ark "built an altar unto Jehovah" 
in the clear sunshine. Abraham, on 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



coming to the land of Canaan pitched 
his tent and built an altar and wor- 
shiped under the canopy of heaven. 
When Jacob slept in a certain place 
with a stone for a pillow,dreams of an- 
gels and Jehovah came to him during 
the night. 

Agassiz had inscribed over the door 
of his laboratory, "Tread softly ; God 
dwells here." Kepler and Newton pro- 
fessed that in their great scientific dis- 
coveries they were thinking God's 
thoughts after him. Also every phy- 
sician, worthy of the name, has met, 
in his professional studies, these same 
fundamental laws of God's universe. 

In addition to these great leaders 
we have Horace Mann as the nost in- 
teresting character in American edu- 
cational life. He was reared in a home 
of poverty and thus, early in life, he 
learned how to fight difficulties while 
he was braiding straw for the purpose 
of earning money to buy his school- 
books. This enabled him to grow up 
as a thoughtful youth with intense 
convictions. It takes no moralist to 
point out the lesson of the life of 
Horace Mann. It is good to take its 
significance into our hearts and follow 
his teaching which is not length of life 
but depth of life. 

We shall next look upon Martin 
Luther as a great reformer. He was 
born in a miner's hut in a small village 
in Germany. His parents were in- 
dustrious and worthy, but poor. The 
lad often went about without receiving 
sufficient food. This however did not 
prevent him from standing upon the 
rock of reason with the word of God 
as a guide. Through the help of the 
great Guide he ascended the ladder of 
knowledge step by step until finally 



we have him, as founder of the Reform- 
ation, uttering such remarkable state- 
ments that they shook the continent of 
Europe. 

From the great reformer let us look 
to the great cynic philosopher who 
spent his boyhood days in Athens ; who 
wore the coarsest clothes ; who lived 
on the plainest food ; whose bed was on 
the bare ground ; and who on one oc- 
casion, in default of a better place, 
took up his residence temporarily in 
a huge tub. The chief aim of his 
philosophy was practical good. He 
smiled at those who studied how to 
enforce truth but not how to practice 
it. In the latter part of his life we have 
him on one occasion Corinth in con- 
versation with Alexander the Great 
who is said to have been struck so for- 
cibly with the cynic's self-possession 
that he went away remarking, "If I 
were not Alexander, I should wish to 
be Diogenes." 

As a statesman, who lived plainly 
and thought deeply Benjamin Frank- 
lin is one of the best types in our his- 
tory. You all know the story how 
Franklin from poverty, through per- 
severance, made his way to the front 
until at last we find him representing 
American interests in Europe, partic- 
ularly in France. Later he held the 
office of governor of Pennsylvania. 
His greatest service to America was 
undoubtedly due to his skill in diplo- 
macy. His public spirit and devotion 
were re-enforced by powers of mind 
and wisdom that made him practically 
unrivaled. 

Lastly, but not least, let us not for- 
get the noble examples that are found 
in literature, a treasure which preserves 
the ideals of a people. For it is the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



ideals of a people that form the founda- 
tion upon which their whole civiliza- 
tion, their freedom, their progress, their 
homes, and their religion rest. It is 
therefore impossible to overestimate 
the value of those men, with high 
ideals, who have preserved noble 
thoughts, while men, cities, govern- 
ments, and empires have vanished from 
the face of the earth. Study the lives 
and characters of the greatest poets 
and you will find a large number of 
them were men of plain living and 
high thinking. Among the most im- 
portant of these we have Samuel 
Coleridge, Robert Southey, and Wil- 
liam Wordsworth. The last one of 
these is especially noted for his simple 
life, and who, when alone in the woods 
and fields, ever felt the presence of 
some living spirit, real though unseen, 
and companionable thought silent. 



Poetry was his life ; his soul was in all 
his work; and only by reading what he 
has written can we understand the man. 
Especially when we read such poems as 
his "Intimations of Immortality," the 
beauty of which inspires us with 
something of the poet's own faith and 
hopefulness, are we enabled to recall 
many happy memories of youth. 

Thus we see what men of all classes 
have done in the past and what they 
have contributed to humanity by sim- 
plicity of life and by the upholding of 
high and noble ideals. The world to- 
day is standing with out-stretched 
arms to those who are willing to set 
such examples before the world that 
will help others to see the beauty there 
is in the simple life, and who at the 
same time, are ashamed to die until 
they have won some victory for hu- 
manity. 




Musings on Lady Macbeth 



Lillian Falkenstein. 



Drake says, "Macbeth is the greatest 
effort of our author's genius, the most 
subHme and impressive drama which 
the world have ever beheld." In study- 
ing the main characters of this play, 
our interest centers especially about 
Lady Macbeth. This is due to the art- 
ful way in which Shakespeare has 
veiled rather than revealed her true 
character. Is she the evil genius of 
Macbeth's soul, Has she no qualities 
to be admired? Is it from selfish mo- 
tives that she spurs him on to murder? 

Let us notice carefully Lady Mac- 
beth's relations to the various crimes. 
To what extent is she guilty? After 
the witches have predicted that Mac- 
beth will become king, he says : 
'"My thoughts, whose murder yet is 

but fantastical^ 
Shakes so my single state of man that 

function 
Is smothered in surmise, and nothing 

is. 
But what is not." 

It is after Macbeth tells her hfs 
plans, that she takes part in the crime. 
She strengthens his purpose with the 
most effective arguments. She plans 
and finishes the work. In the first 
murder, then, Lady Macbeth is an ac- 
complice. Her guilt is equal to Mac- 
beth's. But can this be said of the 
later crimes ? Before the murder of 
Banquo, Macbeth says, "Be innocent 
of the knowledge dearest chuck; 
Till thou approve the deed." She has no 
knowledge of the murder of Macduff's 



family. 

Her influence upon Macbeth, so 
strongly marked at first, wanes. They 
gradually drift apart. Only once more 
do we find Lady Macbeth attempting 
to strengthen his spirit with hers, but 
the potent influence over his will is 
gone forever. 

How shall we picture Lady Mac- 
beth? Is she a mere fiend, a creature 
to be loathed? Do we feel satisfaction 
during the sleep-walking scene? Do 
we gloat over the news of her death 
and approve of Macbeth's heartless 
speech. "She would have died here- 
after"? Surely such an estimate is 
not in harmony with the woman of 
Shakespeare's imagination. It is evi- 
dent that the woman who is called 
"my dearest partner of greatness," 
"my dearest chuck," and who 
eloquently speaks of her "little hand" 
must have been beautiful and attrac- 
tive. 

Notice how unselfish Lady Macbeth 
is throughout the play. When she 
reads the letter from Macbeth, she 
does not utter one selfish word. As a 
queen she can say: 
"Naught's had, all's spent. 
Where our desire is got without con- 
tent." 

But notice how her tone changes 
when Macbeth enters. To him she 
Says : 

"Things without remedy 
Should ge without regard : what's done 
is done." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



Is Lady ]\Iacbeth ambitious ? 
Yes, but it is ambition for her husband. 
She does not think of becoming queen, 
but only Macbeth's becoming king. 
"Glamis thou art, and Cawdor, and 
shalt be, what thou art promised." 

Her will power is marvelous. While 
plotting the murder of Duncan, she 
welcomes him with every evidence of 
hospitality. She lays the dagger in 
readiness. When the knocking at the 
gate works upon her racked nerves, 
by sheer force of will, she directs Mac- 
beth and replaces the daggers. Never 
a word does she utter which would 
reveal the crime until sleep deprives 
her of self-control. 

Lady IMacbeth is a woman with 
womanly instincts, crushed only by her 
deliberate effort of will. 

"Come you spirits that tend on mortal 
thoughts : unsex me here, and fill me 
to the toe topful of direst cruelty." 

She nerves herself with wine, but 
even then she lacked the heart to kill 
Duncan because he resembled her 
father. The sight and smell of blood 
are odious to her, yet with her strength 
of will she can say : "The sleeping and 
the dead are but as pictures," "If he do 
bleed. I'll gild the faces of the grooms 
withal for it must seem their guilt." 

Lady Macbeth prays to be fortified 
aerainst her conscience. 



"Stop up the access and passage to re- 
morse 
That no compunctious visitings of na- 
ture 
Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace 

between 
The effect and it." 

From the moment of her sin, she be- 
gins to feel the blackness of remorse. 
It deprives her of enjoyment. She 
finds no pleasure in being queen. 
" 'Tis safer to be that which we de- 
stroy 
Than by destruction live in doubtful 
joy." 

This remorse grows stronger until it 
overcomes her self command and royal 
will. Once she could say, "A little 
water clears us of this deed." But 
how different in the sleepwalking 
scene ! 

"Here's the smell of blood still, all 
the perfumes of Arabia will not sweet- 
en this little hand." Lady Macbeth is 
slain by conscience. 

How eloquently her life portrays the 
effect of crime ! A lady, beautiful 
and delicate, her nature born for noble 
living becomes insane, babbling her 
awful secrets to every ear. She paid 
dearly for her crime. She lost her 
soul, her husband's love, and her peace 
of mind. 



Every- Day Heroes. 



Ruth E. Coble. 



In every age, inevery country,, and 
in every nation we find true heroes, 
who have made that country famous ; 
heroes who have faithfully and loyally 
fought, bled, and died that their coun- 
try might become great. We cannot 
look at any history without finding 
names of men and women whose noble 
qualities and deeds rank them as he- 
roes. In ancient times we find Mace- 
don had its Alexander ; Greece, its Mil- 
itiades ; Spain, its Hannibal ; and Rome 
its Caesar. In later history, the lives 
of such men and women as Napoleon, 
Luther, Huss, Joan d' Arc, and Flor- 
ence Nightingale, stand out prominent- 
ly as heroes. 

But the question is : Must we look 
back into the past centuries to find 
heroic men and women? Must we 
search the histories to read about 
noble-hearted men and women? Sure- 
ly, we have forgotten the many about 
us ; the many who are daily performing 
heroic deeds ; the many who are en- 
dangering their lives that their fellow- 
men may live. Numerous are the ex- 
amples which are about us. I am sure 
we have never thought of the track- 
walker who daily braves the weather. 
Through sunshine, through rain, and 
through snow, he may be seen trudg- 
ing along the tracks and searching the 
least defect. Have we ever thought of 
the responsibilities he bears upon him- 
self; the many lives which principally 
•depend upon his vigilance and upon 
his care? 



Through valleys, over prairies, and 
down mountains the train glides bear- 
ing its burden of human freight. 
Little do the passengers know what is 
before them. They trust and rely 
upon the track walker to remove all 
obstacles and impediments. 

The nurse who unceasingly bends 
over the sick, and untiringly ad- 
ministers to the afflicted is also a 
noble example of an every day hero. 
For hours she may be seen sitting by 
the bedside of somebody's mother. 
She may be seen straining her energy 
to save that person's life and as a 
final resort her head may be seen 
reverently bowed in prayer. , 

Surely these men and women are 
performing services which are as 
valuable, yes just as valuable as those 
performed by the popular hero. Why 
is the every day hero's name not re- 
corded with the name of the popular 
hero? Certainly his name is just as 
worthy of mention. The reasons for 
the every day hero's name not becom- 
ing famous are these : first, it is sim- 
ply because their work demands them 
to prevent train wrecks or to nurse the 
wounded. These every day heroes are 
paid to attend to their duties and 
therefore people do not regard their 
deeds as h,eroic. It is not so with the 
popular hero. He is not paid to rush 
into the thickest of the fight. Another 
reason may be that the deed perform- 
ed is no unusual happening! The 
walking to and fro of the trackwalker 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



is an every day occurrence and there- 
fore it may be thought that it re- 
quires no attention. Unlike the popu- 
lar hero, he daily seeks to prevent 
wrecks. Perhaps once in his life the 
popular hero performs a brave or 
corageous act and^ then, he becomes 
a world-famous hero. Surely the 
every day hero's deed is not witnessed 
beneficial as that rendered perhaps 
once in the life time of an individual. 
Moreover, the every day hero does not 
become famous, because the deed per- 



formed by the every day hero is some- 
times unseen while that of the popular 
hero is generally witnessed by a 
throng of people;. Certainly, if the 
every day hero's deed is not witnesstd 
here on earth it is witnessed by an all- 
seeing, omnipotent, person. These 
heroes if not rewarded here, shall be 
rewarded hereafter ; they shall be re- 
warded not with a gold medal nor with 
a huge marble monument, but with a 
gift much greater than any ever given 
by any earthly being. 



Bible Department Notes. 

The interest in the Bible Depart- 
ment has been very encouraging 
throughout the Winter Term. The 
enrollment for the term has increased 
74 per cent, above that of last year's 
Winter Term. 

The mission study classes are doing 
faithful work. The advanced class 
has had an average attendance of 
eleven. This class with Mr. B. F. 



Waltz as leader has finished the "Up- 
lift of China" and is now reading "Day 
break in the Dark Continent." The 
beginning class has had an average at- 
tendance of twenty-three. We have 
also finished our first book and are now 
reading "India Awakening." 

Saturday evening, March 15, a pro- 
gram was given on the life of Living- 
stone, in honor of the Centennial of 
his birth. 




EDITORIAL BOARD. 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, '11, Editor in-Chief 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 



Orville Z. Becker, '15 School Notes 

Nora L. Reber, '11 Homerian News 

Mary Scheaffeh, '13: K. L. S. News 

Leah Sheaffer, '09 Alumni Notes 



C. L. Martin, '13 Exchanges 

J. D. Reber, '14 Bus. Mgr. 

A. L. Reber, '13 Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Daisy P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year by Elizabethtown College. 

Arrearage on subscription to this paper is charged. 

Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates: — Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy; five years for |2.00. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postotfice. 



April Fool. 

We believe that many a person was 
again tricked into a bootless errand on 
the first of April, Almost every one 
knows of this facetious practice but 
few are acquainted with its origin, or 
at least with the theories of its origin. 

In seeking for the beginning of this 
custom, it must be observed that ac- 
cording to the old Roman method of 
reckoning time, April was the second 
month and that when the Julian cal- 
endar was adopted it became the 
fourth month. Before the year 1564, 
France regarded the first of April as 
New Year's day, but thereafter it was 



fixed on January i, thus leaving April 
I without any particular significance. 
This change resulted in some confu- 
sion, before all the inhabitants of 
France were adjusted to it, whenever 
the first of April arrived. The peas- 
ants of France, however, finally under- 
stood the change and averted many of 
the mistakes made on that day. 
Whether the practice of duping some 
one had its origin here is not certain, 
but it is by far the most plausible the- 
ory of its origin. The unfortunate sub- 
ject of the trick in France is called a 
"poisson d'avril," or April-fish; in 
Scotland one is said "to hunt a gowk." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



One of the most far-fetched theories 
is that it dates back to Noah. It up- 
holds the idea that Xoah sent out the 
dove on such an errand, — a bootless 
errand. As there is no evidence sup- 
porting the observance of this custom 
before the sixteenth century, it must 
be placed among the dubious hypoth- 
eses of the past. Another theory 
traces some resemblances in the per- 
formances of the old English Mir- 
acles, — short plays given with a view 
to popular religious instruction. But 
here the only similarity to a bootless 
errand is the sending of Christ from 
Annas to Caiaphas and from Pilate to 
Herod. There is also a festival held 
annually in India on March 31, in hon- 
or of Huli, at which the same trick 
stands paramount in the celebrities. 
Thus it is evident that its origin is 
practically unknown, but it is also 
clear to sincere men and women that 
the ethics underlying this obnoxious 
^'fooling" does not savor of Christian 
manhood and womanhood. 

From this custom of duping we wish 
to point out several lessons to be 
learned in our school work. Many 
persons on April i spend time, money, 
and care in doing some errand whfch 
profits them nothing, in like manner 
there are students who begin a term's 
work in earnest, but end it with little 
benefit to themselves. 

One class of students who proceed 
in the above manner are those who at- 
tempt to carry a program of studies 
that is too heavy. Such a student may 
seem to start his work favorably but 
the average student can not bear such 
a strain, and then a physical collapse 
is the result. Sometimes, however, 
the student can bear the strain physi- 
cally but then his work lacks thorough- 
ness. This is the essential character- 
istic of any student's work ; if it is lack- 
ing, the student's chance for success 



is slim. Moreover, it often happens 
that the student who has a surplus of 
studies can not become thorough 
enough in some of them, and conse- 
quently fails to pass those branches. 
This is a waste of time and energy to 
the student; it would be far better for 
him to take a branch or two less and 
master them than to attempt to "rush" 
over a larger number and not become 
proficient. Those who are troubled 
with a mania for a large number of 
studies may be assured that they are 
on the road "hunting a gowk." 

There are also those in every school 
who are indififerent to their work. One 
needs only to visit their rooms in order 
to be convinced of the presence of this 
malady. There seems to be a place 
for everything, but notfiing is in its 
place : one may find books scattered 
over the whole table ; the wardrobe 
extends almost around the room ; the 
pictures have been moved by human 
disturbances— surely not by terrestrial 
quakings ; the waste paper basket has 
grown to an enormous size; the ar- 
rangement of quilts and counterpanes 
sadly betrays ignorance of geometrical 
and symmetrical arrangement; the 
broom, blushing at the floor, has been 
loaned to Mother Goose— these con- 
ditions do not presage success. In 
short, these students have never learn- 
ed to watch the "so-called" little things 
in life. Our success in life will not be 
determined by the few good qualities 
we possess but by the- average of all 
the traits we can claim. If we want our 
lives to count for good in the world 
they must sing that song in our daily 
school life. In view of all this, the 
student who would succeed must 
necessarily pay close attention to his 
indifference to the little things, or he 
will find at the end of his school days 
that he is little more than a "poisson 
d'avril," — an April-fish, or a "gowk." 




s 



N 















t 



L 



S 



'Tis spring-time on the eastern hills ! 
Like torrents gush the summer rills ; 
Through winter's moss and dry dead 

leaves 
The bladed grass revives and lives, 
Pushes the mouldering waste away, 
And glimpses to the April day. 

— Whittier. 

It is not merely the multiplicity of 
tints, the gladness of tone, or the 
balminess of the air which delight in 
the spring; it is the still consecrated 
spirit of hope, the prophecy of happy 
days yet to come ; the endless variety 
of nature, with presentiments of 
eternal flowers which never shall fade, 
and sympathy with the blessedness 
of the ever developing world. — Novalis 

On March the twentieth the winter 
term closed, ending a record term for 
attendance and with bright prospects 
for an excellent spring term which 
opened on March the twenty-fourth. 

The basket ball season is drawing 
to a close with the series between the 
Seniors and Juniors, won bry the 
Juniors by a score of four games 
straight ; the score of the games be- 



tween the Germans and the Dutch 
standing three to two in favor of the 
Germans ; out of the games thus far 
played between the Day and Board- 
ing teams, the Day team has tw» 
games and the Boarding team one. 
The last game between the Day and 
Boarding teams resulted in a victory 
for the Boarding team in a score of 
29 to 23. There also was a game be- 
tween the Commercial Department 
and the English Classics team. The 
Business Men carried ofif the game 
with a score of 23 to 11. 
Commercial English Classics 

Eberly Centre Diehm 

Coble Guard J. D. Reber 

Royer Guard Root 

Brandt Forward Kulp 

Garber Forward Herr 

The Bird-seller: "What bird would 
you hear sing?" 

Miss Moyer: "Oh. the Martin." 

Prof. Meyer who occupies the chairs 
of Mathematics and of Greek at the 
College and who has been the hall 
teacher of Independence Hall for many 
years, has changed his residence from 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



that hail to a beautifvil home on Col- 
lege Avenue. We are sorry to see Mil- 
dred go from College Hill for she has 
proved a source of much interest and 
attention to both the boys and girls at 
school. 

Miss Edna Brubaker to Miss Sheaf- 
fer : "\Mien the thing is all over I want 
to tell you more about how the thing 
went." We were not expecting it so 
soon but wish them everything well. 
Calvin Rose to get Wise. 
Miss Sheaffer, addressing Miss Shel- 
ley at the table : "Pass your soup up 
for some more Shelly." 

The beard league organized at the 
school by some of the gentlemen for 
the purpose of acquiring philosophic 
appearances has gone to the place it 
•came from and so did the beards. 

The Keystone Literary Society has 
purchased a beautiful flag which it has 
draped in the society hall. 

Prof, to J. G. Gingrich: "What is 
deglutition?" J. G. Gingrich: "I think 
it is the work of a delegation." 

A student in Educational Classics 
thinks much of the following, said to 
be quoted from Plato's Republic : "If 
youth is to do its work in life it must 
make Grace its perpetual aim." 

Prof. Meyer to his Arithmetic class: 
""What is the hippopotamus of an 
angle?" 

"When I get married my wife shall 
"have as much right to my pocket book 
as I do." It might be well if more 
students on College Hill would have 
the foresight of Mr. Waltz's room- 
mate. 

Question : Would the reflection un- 
nerve William Tell to shoot an apple 
from Professor Harley's head? 



Miss Stauff'er to Mr. Elam Zug: 
"What is the German name for an- 
gels?" 

Mr. Zug: "Engle." 

On March the fourth, the day when 
the reins of this government were 
handed over to another leader and his 
followers, the school celebrated the 
thirteenth anniversary of the founding 
of the College. The principal feature 
of the evening was an inspiring ad- 
dress by Dr. Eisenberg, a professor in 
the West Chester State Normal School, 
on "The Educational Ideal." 

On the evening of April the eleventh 
the Homerian and Keystone Literary 
Societies will render a program in cele- 
bration of the anniversary of the found- 
ing of the two societies. It promises to 
be a good program and you are invited 
to come. 

Mr. Martin was singing, "De Coppa 
Moon," and when he came to the part 
—"Tell her dat you lob her, m— m — 
ni_." Mr. Rose interrupted him and 
said: "That's real. That's just the 
way a few does." 

The Governor of Pennsylvania says: 
"Let the people lay aside for a season 
the habitual activity of the day and de- 
vote sufficient time thereof to plant a 
forest, fruit, or ornamental tree along 
the public highways and streams, in 
private and public parks, about the 
public schoolhouses, and on the college 
grounds, in gardens and on the farms, 
thus promoting the pleasure, profit, and 
prosperity of the people of the State, 
providing protection against floods and 
storms, securing health and comfort, 
increasing that which is beautiful and 
pleasing to the eye, comforting to phy- 
sical life, and elevating the mind and 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



heart and by associations and meetings 
excite public interest and give en- 
couragement to this most commend- 
able work." 

The Senior class of Elizabethtown 
College will celebrate Arbor Day this 
year by rendering a public program in 
the afternoon of April the eleventh be- 
ginning at three o'clock. 



Arbor Day Program 

Opening Address C. L. Martin. 

Duet Misses Shank and Dennis. 

Recitation Rebekah Sheaflfer. 

Oration E. G. Diehm. 

Music— Vocal Solo C. L. Martin. 

Address — by a Representative of the 
State Department of Forestry. 

Planting of Tree By the Class. 

Song By the Class. 



The Musicale. 

On March 19 was rendered one of 
the best musicales ever given on Col- 
lege Hill. It was a credit to the musi- 
cal de-:)artment in every respect. It 
showed untiring effoi-ts on the part of 
the instructors and the performers. 
We were made to realize that the 
standard of the music department is 
continually rising and that the instruc- 
tion given in this department deserves 
the highest commendation. The au- 
dience showed its appreciation of the 
high-grade selections and their excel- 
lent rendition by their continual call- 
ing for encores. 

The program opened with a gleeful 
chorus of mixed voices in rendering 
Spofiferth's "Hail Smiling Morn." 
This number showed a careful equali- 
zation of parts in difficult passages, a 
precision of tone, and a beautiful in- 



terpretation of the spirit of the morn- 
ing. 

Misses Dennis, Shank, and Stayer 
then rendered in a very creditable man- 
ner Oesten's "Alpine Glow." This 
piano trio gave evidence of careful 
practice and ease of performance. 

Clarke's "A Bowl of Roses" was next 
sung by Miss Delia Shank to the de- 
light of the audience. 

Mendelssohn's "Fantasia" and 
Grieg's "To Spring" were executed in 
an artistic manner by Miss Carrie 
Dennis. The contrast between the 
two selections was delicately drawn by 
the performer. 

Miss Ruth Coble then favored the 
audience with a charming interpreta- 
tion of Parker's "Spirit of Spring." 
Miss Coble showed by the control of 
her. voice that she bids fair to become 
skilled in this art. 

A piano quartette, "Galop de Con- 
cert," by Milde made the halls of Alpha 
Hall ring with music. The ladies who 
acquitted themselves so nobly in inter- 
preting this selection were Misses 
Dennis, Wenger, Shank, and Staj^er. 

Mr. C. L. Martin followed this se- 
lection by giving two vocal soli. 
"What am I love, v/ithout Thee?" by 
S. Adams was the first selection ; the 
second, Oley Speaks' "To You." Mr, 
Martin's smoothness of tone and re- 
sonance of voice won the attention of 
every ear; his graceful poise on the 
rostrum together with his interpreta- 
tion of each selection was very marked. 

There were no listless persons in the 
audience while the chorus class ren- 
dered Rossini's "Carnovale." The 
musicale directress, ]\Iiss Katherine 
Miller, led the chorus in a masterful 
manner. The selection was sung with 
the grace and ease characteristic, of 



I 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



such a selection. Accuracy of tones 
was striking in the minor strains; vig- 
or and expression was very clearly 
evident throughout. 

After a short statement by Miss 
Sheaffer on the composition of Bee- 
thoven's "Moonlight Sonata," Miss 
Delia Shank pleasingly rendered the 
first and second movements of this 
famous work. The sad, melancholy 
dirge of the first movement was exe- 
cuted by a delicate touch with the con- 
tinual accompaniment of a resonant 
rich-toned bass. The second move- 
ment with its more fantastic, care-free 
style displayed the performer's ability 
along a different line of music. 

"O Rest in the Lord" by Mendels- 
sohn, was the title of a vocal solo by 
Miss Elizabeth Kline. This selection 
was the climax of the vocal produc- 
tions. A clear and distinct articula- 
tion, a graceful adaptation of physical 
expression to sentiment, and a well 
trained, melodious voice constitute 
Miss Kline's success as a vocalist. The 
audience recognized her ability and 
called for an encore to which she cheer- 
fully responded in a beautiful selection 
entitled "Come see the Place Where 
the Lord Lay." 

Just as the above was paramount in 
vocal music for the evening so Miss 
Leah Sheaffer's rendition of Liszt's 
"Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2" was the 
nonpareil in instrumental music. Miss 
Sheaffer showed extraordinary ability 
by the apparent ease with which she 
executed this most difficult selection. 
Her forte is penetrative insight which 
leads to the proper interpretation of a 
selection. Her delicate touch, com- 
bined with her precision, bring out the 
very soul of a composition. Her clever 
rendition of cross-hand measures, her 



unerring performance of difficult runs, 
and her masterful display of the blend- 
ing of tones, brought forth loud ap- 
plause, but time forbade her giving an 
encore. 

Bishop's "Hark, Apollo Strikes the 
Lyre" was sung by Misses Sheaffer, 
Miller, and Kline. This selection was 
rendered in a pleasing manner and was 
very much appreciated by the audience 
and was responded to by an encore. 
The blending of the voices was perfect, 
and the spirit of the song was brought 
out in a very forceful and harmonious 
conclusion. 

A piano quartette, "Feste Overture"' 
by Leutner, was next given by Misses 
Sheaffer, Dennis, Kline,, and Shank. It 
was the opinion of more than one musi- 
cal critic that this was the best piano 
quartette ever rendered on College Hill. 
The movement was beautifully sus- 
tained throughout, and the solos were 
given the required prominence. The 
time was excellent, the eight hands 
played as one, and the interpretation 
masterful. 

The concluding number \Nas Myer's 
"O Sing We of Fair Columbia," sung 
by a mixed chorus. The directress. 
Miss Katherine Miller, had all eyes 
centered upon her baton, and with 
melodious tones the chorus did sing of 
"fair Columbia." The solos of the dif- 
ferent parts, and the strong ending of 
the selection thrilled the audience with 
an intense feeling of patriotism. 

We hope the musical department 
may give us another treat of this na- 
ture this term. 



K. L. S. Notes. 

On February 28. the society met in 
regular literary session. The newly 
elected officers were then inaugurated 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



as follows : Pres., Miss ReVjekah Sheaf- 
fer; Sec, Mr. Elam Zug. We note 
that the society believes in woman suf- 
frage in electing a lady for its chief ex- 
ecutive. The following program was 
then rendered : 
Vocal Solo— "Lad and Lassie," 

Carrie Dennis. 

Oration A. L. Reber. 

Referred Question — Discuss Briefly 

the Balkan War, George Neflf. 

Recitation Elizabeth Miller. 

Good Night Mixed Quartette. 

Recitation — "Philosophy of Love" 

C. L. Martin. 
Recitation — "Engaged," E. G. Diehm. 
Vocal Solo.... Miss Katherine Miller. 

Echo Sarah Replogle. 

In the regular executive session of 
March 7, the society decided to pur- 
chase a flag. The following program 
was then rendered : 
Music — Instrumental Solo, 

Edna Wenger. 
Select Reading — "The Dutchman's 

Telephone," N. J. Gibble. 

Debate — Resolved, That there should 
be educational qualification for suf- 
frage. 

This question was debated affirma- 
tively by Miss Landis and Mr. Moyer; 
negatively by Miss Douty and Mr. 
Eberly. 

"A Father's Lullaby" Girls, Quartette. 
Declamation — "Why I Came to Col- 
lege," Ephraim Meyer. 

The program rendered on March 14 
was as follows : 

Music— "America" The Society. 

Essay C. J. Rose. 

Music— "Come See the Place where 

the Lord Lay," C. L. Martin. 

Address — "The Conception of Edu- 
cation," C. L. Martin. 



Recitation — "One Niche the Highest/' 

Ira CoBle. 
Echo Sarah Replogle 

Homerian News 
On the evening of March 14, the 
members of this society met in a reg- 
ular private session and the following 
officers were elected: Speaker, Leah M. 
SheafTer; Vice President, Harry H. 
Nye ; Chaplain, Prof. Harley ; Monitor, 
Katherine Miller; Recording Secretary, 
Benjamin F. Waltz ; Critic Dr. D. C. 
Reber. From the past two elections, the 
society seems to favor ladies for per- 
forming the Speaker's duty. This in- 
deed is to be considered a privilege. 
Woman, as well as man, is given 
executive ability. Then why not allow 
her to develop these powers? Such 
training is certainly essential for mak- 
ing a full-fledged suffragette. After the 
election of officers a very instructive 
and interesting talk was given by Prof. 
Schlosser. He selected for his sub- 
ject. "The Study of the Classics." 
He was full of his subject and 
inspired his audience to the further 
study of literature. 

Friday evening, March 28, the follow- 
ing public program was rendered : 

Invocation Chaplain. 

Readings — Macbeth (Selections) 

Lillian Falkenstein. 

Vocal Solo — Anchored 

Christ L. Martin. 
Debate— Resolved, That the United 
States government should own and 
operate the Railroads. 
Affirmative, J. D. Reber, H. H. Nye. 
Negative, I. J. Kreider, L. W. Leiter, 

Piano Solo Leah M. SheafTer. 

Critic's Remarks Critic. 




Since the last issue of Our College 
Times word from Canada reached us 
saying that Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Gish 
are the pround parents of a baby boy. 
We have not yet heard the date of his 
birth nor his name. This is one more 
addition to our cradle roll. Twenty-five 
years from now Elizabethtown College 
will have twice the number of stu- 
dents now in attendance. 

Abel Madeira is at present em- 
ployed at Rheems by Mr. Greider, the 
poultry dealer. 

Prof, and Mrs. Meyer are now nicely 
settled in their new home on College 
Avenue. The students and teachers 
will find this cottage home a very 
pleasant retreat during this new term. 



Prof. H. K. Ober has been busily 
engaged during the past few months 
in delivering temperance addresses and 
baccalaureate sermons^ On Sunday 
evening, March i6, he preached to the 
graduates at Milton Grove. On Sun- 
day afternoon of the same day we are 
told that he gave an excellent and soul- 
thrilling talk at the Men's meeting in 
the Y. M. C. A. building at Lancaster. 
He gave addresses in the interest of the 
Anti-Saloon league, too, at Gettysburg, 
Lewistown, and Waynesboro. 

Will E. Glassmire attended the 
Musical given at the College on Wed- 
nesday evening, March 19. 

A number of iVIumni have returned 
for school work for the Spring Term. 




In every .activity of life the result 
and even the activity itself must 
possess regularity, symmetry, and 
harmony. To apply the sum total of 
these qualities to the production of 
school papers we would use the terms 
balance and arrangement. 

To have papers balance, each depart- 
ment of the paper must be sufficiently 
treated without transgressing on the 
rights of another. The paper may not 
be mostly literary, it may not be 
all athletics, it may not be mostly 
jokes, it may not be all news, — each 
would be a mark of improper balance. 
Of course paper balance does not 
necessarily mean that an equal number 
of pages shall be devoted to each de- 
partment. It does demand, however, 
that each department shall receive em- 
phasis according to its importance. 

There are a few ideas regarding ar- 
rangement that we would express. 
Every one with a few exceptions 
agrees (and it matters not whether a 
few disagree, for public opinion is not 
formed in accordance with few ex- 
exceptrolis) that reading matter should 



not be mixed with advertisements, for 
advertisements of the proper kind will 
distract from the reading matter. 
Furthermore, we believe that material 
in other respects should be arranged 
in a methodical, orderly manner, — not 
a bit of news here and a bit there, but 
news in one department and literary 
work in another and so on. 

The Xcellentidea has its news mix- 
ed up with its literary work somewhat. 
Your cuts are quite appropriate You 
do not have your reading matter in- 
termingled among the advertisements. 

The Echo has a very up-to-date 
cover. The paper as a whole makes 
a neat appearance. Its literary depart- 
ment is interesting, otherwise the 
material is somewhat scattered. Th,e 
exchange department could be im- 
proved somewhat. It shows a lack of 
penetrative insight. 

The Albright Bulletin again deseryes 
our usual comment. It keeps up to its 
usual high standard. 

The Susquehanna has a most excel- 
lent literary department. this month^-' 

It perhaps seemed a clever idea for 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



the editor of the exchange department 
of the Muhlenberg- to draw a contrast 
between the two articles that appeared 
on college fraternities in Our College 
Times and in Delaware College Re- 
view. In our judgment this editor is 
more of a visionary than either of the 
other writers in that he tries to con- 
trast things that are not to be found in 
either article. However, we can par- 
don his error as great men like Ma- 



cauley have also sacrificed truth for 
the sake of picturing a striking anti- 
thesis. Your paper presents a good 
appearance, and is well arranged. 

The editorial department of the Nar- 
rator is up-to-date. The paper is well 
balanced but lacks a little in arrange- 
ment. 

We believe that cover cuts signifi- 
cant of the season are entirely in place. 
Let us have more of them. 



Fresh and Smoked Meats 

S. M. RENSEL 

S. Market St. 0pp. Exchange Bank 

Trj Mother's Bread — Home-Made. None 
Better, Terw as Good. 

D. H. BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTOAVN 



The baker who knows how. Phone or drop a postal 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPUES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



CENTRAL 



MEAT 



MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



H. H. GOOD 



EIIZABETHTOWN 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 



The Pratt 
Teachers' Agency 



70 Fifth AveKue 
Ne-w York 



R. H. SHISSLER. 



Receives calls at all seasons for college 
and normal trraduates, specialists and 
other teachers in colleges, public and 
private schools in all parts of the coun- 
try. 

Advises parents about schools. 

■WM. O. PRATT, Manager 



Plain Suits, Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats. 

GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange Sts., Lancaster, Pa. 

Elizabethtown Dental 
Parlors 

Office Closed Thursday 
and Friday 

S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 

Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



26 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage, 






.il<KI!l»!lliBim;a^'iBIIIIIBIi:ilSiil!:BIIIIIB1!lim!IIIB;:ll:ai:!l!B'''iBilil 
il College Jewelry cf the Better Sort 

I G. Wm. REISNER 

1 Manufacturing 

I Jcivelcr 

g Class Pins and Rings Prize Cnps 

M Fraternity Jewelry Medals 

= 120 East Chestnut Street. 

m LANCASTER, PA- 

"iil;iBlllllllllli@IIIIIB{IIIIBIiliiaili;!yilll@lilllBI!llinilllBIIIIIBIIIIIB{lllll 

ill ill iti iti ■?■ ill »ii ill ill Ji iluli ill il' il' 't 'I' '1' ■!■ ■!■ '|"I' tI' il" "I" "I"I"i* ^ 

I LEO KOB 

I Heating and 



* 
* 

* 

|;4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4i4.4.4.4.ii.4>^4>4>4>^<!*4*<ii4>4» 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



* 

* 
* 



F. T. Muth 



MUTH BROS. 



Dealers in 



4* 
H. M. Muth * 
**• 
4> 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 



LUMBERo^ 

Also all kinds of building material ^ 

and mill work, Slate and Cement, ^ 

Wheeler Screens, Fertilizer, Patent || 

Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board, etc. ^ 

4* COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. % 



* 



* We also aim to give you a square 
4" deal that will merit your trade and 

* friendship. 
* 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



* 
* 
* 
4> 
* 
* 
* 
* 



DENTIST 

GEO. ri. KERSEY 
Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



1 WE DO IT RIGHT. 



Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES ^ SON 

F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 

Horseshoeing a Specialty. 

N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 



J. CROFF & SONS 

eat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



— if you want to. Yes, in any posi- 
tion, any pocket. 

Boys: carry the Parker Jack Knife 
Pen in your trousers pocket along 
wi:h your keys. 

Girls: carry !t in the pocket of 
your white blouse. 

Flay football with it, — basketbcll, 
tennis, hockey. It's on the job the 
minute you want to write, without 
leaving a pinhead spot of in.k any- 
where it has been carried. 

Write? Just im-gine a pen of 
gliss that melts to ink as you slide it 
across paper! That's the way it writes. 

Price $2. 50 up. Get one en trial. 
Take it back any time witliin 10 
days if you're not tickled to death 
with it. We authorize dealer to re- 
fund. If your dealer doesn't carry 
Parkers, write us for catalog lodoy, 

PARKER PEN COMPANY 
Mill St., Janesville, Wis. 

PARKER 

Jack Knife Safety 

FOUNTAIN PEN 







For sale at the Bookroom. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 27 



1900 1912 

IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 

SEVEN REASONS : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Equipment. 

For further particulars, address 

Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN PA. 



28 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready- Made Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 



North East Corner Centre Square, 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



JACOts FISHER 
Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 

With voii for 31 vears. That's All 



E H. 



COAL 



WOOD, GRAIN ^ FEED, FLOUR. 
Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Bell and Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 

46 E. King St., Lancaster, Pa. 



C HOICE 



EATS 



A. K. Young 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

W. R. Ashenfelter | 

CHOICE BREAD AND | 
CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied with 
Fancy Cakes at short notice. 



S S. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
■win convince. Work guaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Eiizabethtown, Pa, 



Ind. Phone 



Hours 8 to 6 



DR. JEROME G. HESS 
DENTIST 



Hertzler BIdg. 
Eiizabethtown Pa. 




Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 

Choice Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees, Fresh Country Butter and Eggs 

Bell Phone Eiizabethtown, Penna 

We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEM MAN BROS. 

Y. M. C. A. BIdg., Lancaster, Pa. 

i H. H. BRAND7 I 

i 



Dealer in 



ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



I 

♦ 

: _ 

♦ Eiizabethtown, - - Penna. 

$ 
»♦»♦♦»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



THE ''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 



r 



'-% 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 

Shipped every Wednesday 



ELIZA BETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



J^ 



Sporting Goods 



Post Cards 



Agent for all periodicals. 

Pocket cutlery, toys, novelties, etc. 

Fine confections. 

H. K. Dorsheimer 

Bell 'Phone 38-3 
On the Square, Elizabethtown. Pa. 



School Supplies 



Stationery 



John A. Fisher 



BARBER 



Centre Square, 



Elizabethto-wn, Pa. 



JOS. H. RIDER & SON 




AGENCY FOR 



SPALDING'S 



I Baseball i Tennis Goods 



. B. KLir^E 



CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



GEO. A. FISHER 

HARDWARE 

< Automobiles 

< Phonoyraphs and 
Records 

F. P. GAS PLANTS 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



X ELIZABETHTOWN 

X ROLLER MILLS 



X 

\ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ ELIZABETHTOWN, 



J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades of 

FliOUR ANB FEED 

Highest Cash Prices paid for grain, 
hay and straw 

PENNA. 



I 



^♦^ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



A. A. AeELE 



The Bee Hive Store 



South Market and^Bainbridge Streets, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Drj' Gocds,Notions, Shoes, Carpets, Draperies and an Up-to-Date 
Gent's and Ladies' Furnishings 

''SOMETHING NEW EVERY DAY" 



line of 




The Duplex 

Recommends Literary 
and Commercial teachers 
Secretaries and Account- 
ants. Schools for sale. 
Circurlars free. Write 
for further information. 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Lunches 

D. W. MiESSE 

Baker and Confectioner 

123 N. Queen St. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Ice Cream 



Telephones. 



Water Ice 



^ V ^B* V»**J' V •Jtijiiji tj^ ^"j* ^ •!• ^* 'J* ^* •^••{••{•^••Ji •{■ •J«»J»iJu •^ttjtri 



D. G. BRinSER 



Co 



Grain, Flour, Feed, 
Seeds, Hay, Straw > 
and Fertilizer. > 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 

A farmer once to a certain age ^ 

;In the Lunch Room Business did en- ^ 
gage. S 

T'was Nissley. ^ 

Thousands of people now are fed, ^ 

Pure, delicious, quick. Enough said. ^ 

TRY NISSLEY 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. 



4> 
* 

* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 

* 



Ursinus College 

COLLEGEVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 

(24 miles from Philadelphia.) 

O K^nized and administered under the Gr'^up Sys- 
tem of Instruction, providing both liberal culture and 
special preparation for the vsrious vocations, an 
arrangement presenting exceptional advantages for 
efficiency and economy All groups open to women 
as well as men Write for special bullftin and 
descriptive pamphlet. 

A. Edwin Keigwin D.D., President. 
Geo. Leslie Omwake, Pd.D., Vice-Pres. 



t 

* 




I Spalding Sporting Goods f 



^ Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, J. 

1 Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic ♦ 

♦ Shoes. Kodaks .and Cameras, de- ♦■ 
^ veloping and finishing. ^ 

♦ ♦ 

♦ H. B. H E R R 4- 



30-32 West King Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 



[iinmiHi 



IF ITS MUSIC OR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, WE HAVE IT! 

IRitR Johnson S. Co. 

MUSIC HALL 
16-18 West King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 

niiBiniiiiHiiiHiiiiHiiiiHiiHiinminiiiiiHiiiHHniiniiuiaiiiiHiiiifliiiii^^ 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



31 



I Mail Orders Solicited for | 
I Books and Bibles 



i THE BOOK STORE 



C. 1^. FALKEWSTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. % 



Ipainting anb paper 
Ibanging 

AMOS B. DRACE 

ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 

Catalogues a Specialty 

311 W. Grant St., LANCASTER, PA. 



REBER WAGONS! 



is the cry of man and horse. The 
horse says "It pulls so easy" and the 
man says "It rides so nice and lasts 
so long." So come my neighbor, get 
yourself such an outfit and be pleased 
yet more than that. 

REBER WAGON WORKS 
Centreport, Pa. 



n 



r 



S. C. GRAYBILL 



==^ 




^: 



College Hill Dairy 

Fresh milk and cream daily. All milk 
tested for children; free from tuberculosis 

HOTELS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED 



^ 



TAKE YOURj 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morning. 
Returns Wednesday and Friday afternoon. 

CALL AT 
RALPH GROSS SHAVING PARLOR! 
Conducted on sanitary principles. 

Massaging a Specialty. 
Agency of First-Class Laundry. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



3 f 



O. N. HEISEY 



^ 
& 



1^ Provisions, Groceries, CS, Choice Candies ^ 



;5 HEISEY BrDIM>ING 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. ^ 



32 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Elizabettitoi/vn Exchange 

Bank 



Transacts a general banking business, pays in- 
terest on time deposits, solicits your patronage 



OFFICERS 



A. G. HETSEY, Pres. 



ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice Pres 



J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 



DIRECTORS 



A. G. Heisey Jos. G. Heisey B. H. Greider, H. J. Gisb 

Allen A. Coble Dr. H. K. Blough Henry E. Landis J. H. Buch 

Dr. A M. Kalbach Geo. D. Boggs E. E. Hernly 






P. N. Kraybill 



Penu'a I 



Both 'Phones 

Rheems - 

Dealer in 

Groceries, Dry Goods, Notions, ^ 
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers % 

— t 

Hardware, Paints, Oils, Turpen- | 
tine and Glass Z 



^ Oilcloth, Linoleums, Matting, Win- 
dow Shades and Strips 



Soliciting a Share of Your Business 



lIBilll.Bilill@illllBil 



ilHIIIIIBII 



Warner's 

Corsets 

are the only corsets that are en- 
dorsed so fully and strongly to us. 

Guaranteed to shape fasliion- 
ably, to fit comfortably, and not 
to rust, break or tear. 

You connot say any more In 
favor of a corset excepting to give 
its price — 

$1.00 to $2.00 Per Pair 

If we could say just the things 
that we say about Warner's Rust- 
Proof Corsets, it would make 
any corset worth while ; but 
WARNER'S are the only corsets 
we can make this absolute state- 
ment regarding. 

HuDtzberger-Winters Co. 

BUZABETHTCWN, PA. 

iiiniiiiainiiHiiiniiiHiiiniiiiHiiiniiiiniiiiHiiiiiHiiiiii 



M 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



"It's not what we say we do; 
It's what we do." 

How often have you read the promises of men? 

How often have you paid the pena Ity afterwards? 

We often question the advisability of telling about 
the clothes we sell, for talk is cheap. However, there is 
only one way to interest the man who doesn't know us 
and that is to advertise. So, we are forced to use this 
method of getting in touch with you. 

This advertisement is not going to say a single word 
about our clothes. Its only object is to invite you to 
visit our shop. When you arrive here we'll show you. 

Can we hope to see you soon? 

"FOLLOW THE ARROW" TO 

S. M. MYERS & CO. 

CLOTHIERS — FURNISHERS — HATTERS 
12 East King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 



Our Advertisers arc Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Hertzler's Department Store 




Your needs supplied at satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, Groceries, Ready-to-Wear Clothing tor Men 
and Women of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Floor UilclotU 
Shoes, Etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-Measure 

CLOTHING 

International Tailoring Co., New York. 
American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chicago. 
Up-to-Date Samples on Hand. 



ISlaCK l^at ^giiT^LER BROS. & CO 

I-Iqciai^ elizabethtown. pa. 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier , "' _ 

■■--. U. S. DEPOSITORY 2 ^ J 

Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits 8857,000.00 

General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid on special 
deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 



DIRECTORS 



W. S. Smith 



Elmer W. Strickler Peter N. Rutt 

V w Groff J- S. Risser B. U Geyer 

F. w. Groir Kr^^^ r rnhiA E. E. Coble 

m C. Ginder Amos G. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 




I 



' 



I 



I 



f 






ANNOUNCEMENT ! 



a 



A great many people are 
going to have their Photos 
taken this Spring, Why? 
Never before in the history 
of Lancaster county have 
they had a photographer 
that makes you look like 
yourself. . This Carl 
Schlotzhauer does to perfec- 
tion. The only studio of 
its kind in this part of the 
state outside of Philadel- 
phia. 



a 



STUDIO 

163 N. Queen St. 

OPPOSITE HOTEL WHEATLAND 
Lancaster, Pa. 



^wvv 



wwv^^v^ 



We Ar« Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made to Order 



Plain 
Clothing 

In This Country 

When in Lancaster it will pay 
you to visit ours; the only 
Clothing Store in that city that 
has One Price to All and gives 
discounts to none. See us for 

MEN'S READY MADE AND 
MADE TO ORDER 

Clothing 

AND 

Furnishing 

YOUTH'S AND BOYS' 
CLOTHING 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Since 1854 at 

Centre Square, Next to City Hall 

LANCASTER, .PA. 



^^^^^^^^^^$ 




Q^T£/^^ 




THE BEGGAR'S FACE 5 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 6-8 

THE WORLD'S LEGAL TENDER 9-12 

ARBOR DAY 12-16 

EDITORIALS 17-18 

SCHOOL NOTES 19-21 

SUMMER TERM 20 

K. L. S. NEWS 21 

HOA/[ERIAN 21 

ALUMNI 22 

RESOLUTIONS OF SYMPATHY 23 

EXCHANGES 24-25 



(§m (Sinlk^t ExmtB 



Vol. X Elizabbtthtown, Pa., May, 1918 No. 8 



The Beggar's Face. 



The young wife sang at her twiHght tasks, 

When there came to her vine-wreathed door 
A woman in ragged garments clad, 

Shelter and food to implore ; 
Her shriveled face and faltering step 

Were expressive of life's decline ; 
At the threshold she heard a tender voice 

Singing of auld lang syne. 

The singer opened the portal wide 

And welcomed the beggar in ; 
She looked at the sad discouraged eyes, 

At brow and cheek and chin, 
Till the face was transformed to the bloom of youth 

When it mirrored the divine. 
And to her vision she seemed as fair 

As in days of auld lang syne. 

Ah, the young wife's queenly heart beat true; 

In compassion she cheered her guest, 
Bade her eat and be merry and banish care, 

Then laid her fondly to rest; 
O'er that beggar's face spread a peace and a glow 

As of morning's soft sunshine, 
While she slept in that couch of love, and dreamed 

Of the days of auld lang syne. 

— Nescis. 



Domestic Science. 



Mary E. Hertzler. 



Domestic Science as adopted by the 
Public School system includes house- 
hold economics. The introduction of 
manual training into American public 
schools naturally led to the develop- 
ment of sewing and cooking as branch- 
es of study for girls, and courses of this 
kind have been established in the gram- 
mar and the high schools of our cities. 

As instructors in Domestic Science, 
women of sound education and thor- 
ough professional knowledge are re- 
quired. Schools and colleges in all 
parts of the country are demanding 
such teachers. As I remember, the 
course in Home Economics outlined 
in the catalogue of the Pennsylvania 
State College is a four year's college 
course including the Romance 
Branches ; namely, English, Latin, Ger- 
man, History, etc., and the Scientific 
Branches such as Botany, Zoology, Ge- 
ology, Chemistry, together with Psy- 
chology, Pedagogy, History of Educa- 
tion, Physics, and Mathematics, laying 
special stress upon all the branches re- 
lating to Domestic Science and Art, in- 
cluding Bacteriology, Cookery, Sani- 
tary and Applied Chemistry, Chemistry 
of Food, Household Sanitation, House- 
hold Management, Laundry, Sewing 
Courses, Care of the Sick and Conval- 
escent, Physical Training, Sewing, 
Dressmaking, Millinery, Design, His- 
tory of Costume, Embroidering and 
Crocheting, Handwork,— including 
Cord work, Rafifia, Loom-weaving, and 



Basketry. As the subject is such a 
broad one, I shall not confine myself 
to any particular head but will give a 
general idea of the values to be derived 
from some of the different phases. 

A home economist is one who ex- 
pends, or directs the expenditure of 
money, time or labor judiciously and 
without waste. Living should be made 
more economical and less burdensome. 
Why should we not give more time^ 
thought, and study to the care and wel- 
fare of our homes? Are our homes and 
children not more important than our 
business attachments? The home is the 
nursery of the citizen. Nothing which 
Church, School, or State can do will 
quite make up for the lack in the hojiie ; 
then no subject can be of greater im- 
portance than a discussion of the stand- 
ards involved in home life. "Man ad- 
vances when his comforts keep pace 
with his intelligence." The need in 
household organization is for a com- 
plete readjustment in accordance with 
modern conditions. Home will not be 
home if the mother is mother to world- 
children and not to those of her own 
flesh and blood. The home still means 
the perfection of child life for which it 
exists. The home should be made at- 
tractive and pleasing. It should be 
the expression of the persons in it,— of 
their ideals, tastes, education, and 
needs of soul, as well as of body. 

There should be no unnecessary 
things in the house to become dusty 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and need additional care. Furniture 
should be simple, with plain surfaces 
that are easily cleaned and not highly 
polished. A -careful account of expen- 
ditures should be kept. Under ordi- 
nary circumstances one-fourth of a 
man's income is spent for food, one- 
fifth for rent (including fuel) three- 
twentieths for operating expenses, 
three-twentieths for clothing and one- 
fourth for higher life, as education, 
religion, b x^ks, charity, and savings. 

The hapi y-go-lucky way brings debt, 
disgrace, and dependence which is de- 
basing. It is the unexpected, the un- 
provided for, which eats into the bank 
account. 

Economy should be observed as well 
in the Preparation of Food, and the 
mistress of every home should have a 
knowledge of the chemical composi- 
tion of food in order to give the inmates 
of the home a properly balanced diet. 
The health of the family should be her 
first consideration. The proper cook- 
ing of food may be regarded as an art, 
and cooking has always been and 
always will be an accomplishment in a 
woman even above that of painting and 
music. 

She should know that the food con- 
tain not only the nourishing material 
but that this should be of such a 
character that it is just adapted to the 
wants of the body. In order to find 
out what the human body needs for its 
sustenance we may notice either the 
composition of the body or we may 
study milk, which is the food provided 
by nature to nourish the young. The 
body contains the following chemical 
elements : oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, 
chlorin, fluorin, silicon, calcium, potas- 
sium, sodium, magnesium, iron, man- 



ganese, and copper, — sixteen in all. 
It is reasonable that, as some foods are 
too rich in proteids and others con- 
tain too large a portion of carbohy- 
drates, we should mix these in the pro- 
per quantities. This we do when we 
eat bread and cheese ; ])otatoes and 
beef; or rice, eggs, and milk in pud- 
dings. As the system adapts itself to 
a certain kind of food and the stomach 
secretes gastric juice sufficient in kind 
and quantity for that food, it is not ad- 
visable after being accustomed to one 
kind of diet for a long time to change 
too suddenly to one that is entirely dif- 
ferent, for indigestion may result. The 
food selected should be suited to the 
habits, age, and employment of a per- 
son. A sedentary man will not thrive 
on a diet that is too stimulating, nor 
one engaged in active manual labor 
upon starchy foods alone. The food 
that is readily digested by an adult will 
be not at all adapted to the use of a 
young child. 

In cooking an albuminous food, as an 
egg, if frying is the method of cooking 
used, the temperature is necessarily so 
high that the egg albumin is rendered 
hard and partially insoluble in the di- 
gestive fluids. Oysters, when satisfac- 
torily cooked, are heated only to boil- 
ing, or if fried, are surrounded by a bat- 
ter, which protects the albuminous tis- 
sues from being overheated. A high 
temperature also greatly decreases the 
digestibility of the gluten of grains and 
of the casein of milk, so the latter liquid 
is less wholesome when boiled. In 
general, vegetable food is cheaper than 
animal food, either as a source of en- 
ergy or as a builder of tissue. The rea- 
sons for this are evident when we con- 
sider that the vegetable foods are built 



8 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



up from the simple substances found 
in air, water, and soil, while the food of 
animals consists of highly organized 
vegetable or animal substances. One 
author states as an illustration of the 
comparative cost of vegetable food, 
that two and one-half acres devoted to 
raising mutton would support a man 
for a year, while the same amount de- 
voted to the growing of wheat would 
support i6 for the same time. While 
carbohydrates are cheap constituents 
of food, proteids and fats are expen- 
sive. If the fat is derived from animal 
sources this is particularly true, but 
foods containing cotton-seed oil and 
the oil of some varieties of nuts, fur- 
nish fat at a reasonable price. 

There is no necessary relation be- 
tween the cost of a food and its nutri- 
tive value. We pay for color, size, ap- 
pearance, and flavor in foods, not for 
their value in feeding the body. There 
is practically as much nourishment in 
the cut of beef costing eight cents per 
pound as in that costing sixteen cents. 

It is important that the right method 
of cooking should be selected for each 
food, a method that shall develop the 
agreeable flavors and make the food as 
digestible as possible. A cheap cut of 
beef may be made appetizing and 
wholesome by careful and skillful cook- 
ing, and it is equally true that an ex- 
pensive cut may be made tough and 
tasteless by the ignorant cook. It is 
easy to spoil good food and render it 
unwholesome by cooking it in fat, or 



by too slow heating. Potatoes may be 
cooked till they are "mealy" and the 
separate starch, grains glisten in the 
light, or they may be water soaked and 
Avaxy and consequently hard to digest.. 
It is easy to prepare sour or heavy 
bread, .overheated toast, tough beef 
steak, or muddy coffee, but the raw ma- 
terial costs just as much as if the food 
product had been made wholesome and 
agreeable. 

But I dare not weary your patience. 
Suffice it to say that the importance of 
knowing how to choose and combine 
foods, so as not only to please the pal- 
ate, but also to promote the health and 
happiness of all persons in the home,, 
can hardly be over-estimated. 

Owen Meredith seems to advocate 
the importance of good cooking in his 
poem : 
We may live without poetry, music,, 

and art ; 
We may live without conscience and 

live without heart; 
We may live without friends ; we may 

live without books ; 
But civilized man cannot live without 

cooks. 
We may live without books, — what is 

knowledge but grieving ? 
We may live without hope — what is 

hope but deceiving ? 
We may live without love, — what is 

passion but pining? 
But where is the man that can live 

without dining? 



The World's Legal Tender. 



H. H. Nye 



111 terms of law, legal tender is an 
offer, either of money to pay a debt, or 
of services to be performed, in order to 
avoid a penalty or a forfeiture which 
would be incurred by noH-payment or 
non-performance. But we shall now 
look upon legal tender as having a so- 
cial significance. Every person born 
into this world is placed here for a pur- 
pose and that purpose is designed by an 
All-wise Creator. Every individual as 
lie arrives at maturity opens an account 
-with the world, with an enormous debt 
to countless ages past. 

All through the centuries man has 
laeen toiling, struggling, and pressing 
forward to an ideal which actuated all 
Tiis efforts. That ideal which has 
moved him to action is freedom, — phy- 
sical, intellectual, and spiritual free- 
dom. Have you ever thought that the 
valleys of this old earth have been 
stained with the blood of the hero and 
the martyr; how that from the hillsides 
of our beloved nation, — yea, from the 
hillsides of many nations, — flowed 
streams of humanity's blood poured 
forth on a hard-fought field so that 
home, nation, and principle might be 
preserved? Did you ever stop to think 
how that countless generations have 
"been persevering under the cruel hand 
cf barbari-^m and despotism that their 
posterity might enjoy comforts and 
blessings which they themselves were 
so strictly denied by the cruel hand of 
the tyrant? Do you not stop with a feel- 
ing of reverence and adoration when 
you ponder over the fact that your 



forefathers have often lived in seclu- 
sion, spent their da^s in prison, in the 
dungeon, in darkness ; have lived apart 
from friends, home, and loved ones for 
the sake of carrying forward a right- 
eous cause in the progress of human- 
ity? 

Not only has man been eager for his 
spiritual freedom and development but 
he has ever tried to improve his physi- 
cal comforts. So from the crudeness 
and imperfection in man's food, shelter, 
and tools has evolved a complex and 
highly-fashioned product ministering 
to his needs and comforts. 

Nor is this all. For all ages have 
preserved against the corroding ele- 
ments of time what thinking men have 
accomplished in liberating the human 
brotherhood from the bondage of ig- 
norance. Every age has solved its per- 
plexing problems under the crushing 
pressure of necessity and without a 
precedent. "The growth of human 
civilization is like the upward mount- 
ing of the coral reef in the midst of the 
sea — each worker rises upon the shoul- 
ders of his predecessors." 

Now with this golden heritage of the 
past 'aid in your hand and in mine as a 
fiee yet priceless gift, do you not bow 
your head in gratitude to your fathers 
and raise your voice in thanksgiving to 
God for the glorious privilege in this 
golden age of the world? All civiliza- 
tion has been working for you and me 
and the fruitage of their labors incurs 
a great obligation upon us. Will you 
say that you have been thrust into this 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



world against your will, without your 
conscent, and for that reason you owe 
nothing toward it? Will you selfishly 
say that you owe the race nothing for 
its trials and turmoils? Nay, this is an 
inevitable debt which can be canceled 
only by noble, efficient, and altruistic 
services. The only recognized legal 
tender of the world is personal service. 
It is a law of God's own design govern- 
ing the life of every human being and 
clearly exemplified in the life of the 
Saviour of mankind. The violation of 
this law brings upon the transgressor 
indescribable wretchedness both in this 
life and in the life to come ; but an 
humble observance brings unspeakable 
joy and peace into every life. 

What is your aim in life? Do you 
prefer to mount to the highest pin- 
nacles of fame and honor and be crown- 
ed with a diadem of fading glory arid 
yet be scorned by a multitude of ene- 
mies behind? Or do you desire to ap- 
ply your talents in establishing a broth- 
erhood of noble friends in the lower 
walks of life who shall pronounce upon 
your head choice blessings and grati- 
tude for the love and service that you 
have manifested toward them in dire 
need? Do you aspire to the legislative 
hall, the judicial bench, or the presiden- 
tial chair? Is your ideal of greatness 
to mingle with the high and exalted? 
Or are you content to stay among the 
lowly and touch them with the finger 
of love and feeling of compassion, to 
lift them from the mire of debauchery, 
ignorance, sensuality, and sin? Surely 
obedient, humble service toward man-* 
kind and toward God deserves the 
most enduring crown. It is that kind 
of service which crowns the servant 
with a diadem, not made with hands 



and of gold, but with joy and happiness 
that shall endure through never- 
ending ages. 

Should you despair of honor and 
fame, do you look forward to worldly 
pleasure and sinful luxury? Do you 
wish to while away your precious mo- 
ments and to sacrifice your noble man- 
hood in seeking that which satisfies but 
for a time? Do you wish to lay on the 
altar your vigor, your energy, and your 
power and allow your sinful self to de- 
velop all its effeminate qualities? How 
devitalizing in its effect is the pleasure- 
seeking element of our American civili- 
zation today ! It does not only rob 
them of the best that is in them but in 
its immoral influence it reaches out and 
poisons the many thousands with its 
venomous fangs. How many men and 
women today are all astir and lurking 
around questionable places seeking 
cheap fun and debasing pleasure which 
endures but for a season? And then, 
alas, the wretched penalty is inflicted. 
They satisfy their voracious appetites 
with all the rich dainties, but the Crea- 
tor keeping watch over all is filled with 
grief at the fact that his sacred temple 
is defiled, and he pronounces the dread 
penalty of unending wretchedness upon 
the guilty. How foolishly men seek 
pleasure and yet it cannot be acquired 
nor bought with a price. Happiness 
and pleasure are conferred upon the in- 
dividual only in proportion that he 
makes others happy and conforms to 
the laws of his being. Then let us 
shun the worldly and debasing pleas- 
ures of this life and cleave to that which 
exalts and uplifts the soul, and though 
we be rejected and perchance unknown 
to the world at large, and be denied of 
that which man pronounces pleasure. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



yet we shall have the blessed assurance 
of eternal bliss if these corrupt things 
have not robbed us of time for true 
service toward humanity and culture 
of the soul. 

If you do not long" for honor or covet 
pleasure, perchance you may desire 
riches and an abundance of worldly 
goods. Do you aim at hoarding wealth, 
at filling large coffers with gold, at ac- 
cumulating costly mansions, farms, 
and lands? Shall your sole purpose in 
life be amassing; a fortune consisting: if 
all these things? \\'ill you go through 
the world seeking these things continu- 
ally and forget the best of life, or will 
you shun these and aim beyond them 
all at the wealth of true manhood? For 
what shall it profit a man if he gain the 
^vhole world of wealth, fame, and pleas- 
ure and in the end fall short of God's 
■divine approval. These are but gayly- 
colored leaves fallen from nature's lav- 
ish tree. Then will you search for 
these persistently as they lie upon the 
ground, or will you look up and see the 
golden, luscious fruit which you may 
pluck from the tree of life abundantly 
if you but show yourself worthy of the 
prize? The greatest demoralizing in- 
fluence on American life and institu- 
tions is the accumulation of wealth. 
How often the miser says to himself, 
""Though widows are penniless and 
children are crying for bread and shiv- 
ering in the cold, though the laborer 
toils by sheer force of poverty for a 
slender compensation, though I send 
demented men to the gallows by 
snatching away their small portion of 
earthly goods, though I drive thous- 
ands against poverty's wall by exact- 
ing harsh tributes, and though I reach 
down into poor men's pockets and steal 



their last precious coin; little need I 
care for my coffers are overflowing, 
my bank account brings heavy inter- 
est, my possessions are innumerable 
and pleasant to look upon ; yea, verily 
I have accumulated sufficient to buy 
the largest city in the world. Soul, 
take thy ease and live in luxury." 

Then do we want these things which 
satisfy not the soul and last but for a 
season. Turn away from these and be 
a servant of humanity, be willing to 
pay your just debt to former genera- 
tions, humble yourself and raise the 
world from all that is low. Work, exer- 
cise, self-effort, self-help, and self-reli- 
ance are the laws to which we must 
conform. It is this class of toilers that 
has borne the burdens of the race un- 
der the scorching heat of the midday 
sun. No other can do your work and 
let you sit idly by. No father is so rich 
as to be able to confer upon his son 
immunity from personal effort inthe 
struggle for existence. No matter 
what others have achieved you cannot 
do the same without earnest effort. So 
do not be a human drone and demand 
the best from the garners filled 
by the toil of others ; nay, rather put 
your shoulder to the wheel and save 
others from human drudgery. 

Idleness results only in deterioration 
rust, and decay. Self-destruction be- 
gins as soon as effort ceases. There is 
no power in heaven nor on earth which 
can prevent an idle brain from deteri- 
orating. No man can become strong 
unless he obeys the natural laws writ- 
ten in his very constitution. Nature's 
edict is "use or lose." Effort, constant 
effort, is the inevitable and indispen- 
sable price of manhood. 

Be not deceived ! the price must be 



■H. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



paid, not in wealth and material gifts, 
but in acting well your part in the up- 
ward march of civilization. If you 
would be a man, your life, when 
weighed in the balances of truth, must 
have the true spirit and clear ring vi- 
brating from a long life of personal ser- 
vice. If you make the world just a lit- 
tle better than you found it, if your life 
has radiated a righteous influence and 
has brought light to multitudes drift- 
ing into the whirlpool of darkness, then 
and then only shall your life pass as 
les;al tender. The hisfhest service that 



you can ever render the world, the 
greatest thing you can ever do, is to 
make yourself the largest, noblest, and 
best man possible. Direct your ability, 
education, talent, and energy into the 
channels of character, helpfulness, and 
usefulness, — and though this world 
may place upon you the stamp of fail- 
ure, — nevertheless, with your feet firm- 
ly planted, on the rock of justice and 
with the. wings of truth bearing you 
aloft, you shall transcend into the high- 
er realms of true bliss, unspeakable 
wealth, and everlasting joy. 



Arbor Day. 



An Address Delivered at the Senior Arbor Day Exercises by Prof. A. E. 
Ziegler of the Mont Alto School of Forestry. 



April days are glorious. If they 
bring rain, the grateful soil treats with 
a life pulsing draught each joyful blade 
of starting grass, each spurting stalk 
of lately dormant winter grain. We 
cannot help but sing with Robert 
Loveman : 

"It is not raining rain to me, 

It's raining daffodils, 
In every dimpled drop I see 

Wild flowers on the hills. 

"The clouds of gray engulf the day, 
And overwhelm the town ; 

It is not raining rain to me, 
It's raining roses down. 

"It is not raining rain to me. 
But fields of clover bloom, 



Where any buccaneering bee 
Can find a bed and room. 

"A health unto the happy, 

A fig for him who fets ! 

It is not raining rain to me 
It's raining violets!" 

Behold the magic soft green mantle 
that cheapens the rugs and tapestries 
of a king's cloisters, for the walls of the 
grandest palace are but monkish 
cloisters when the April days are call- 
ing: or they bring such sun, as only 
April knows, to burst the buds into 
leaf and flowers in wayside and or- 
chard, lawn and forest, the billowy 
bloom makes conquest of yet another 
sense with its fragrance ! And as if 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



to surfeit all the human senses, April 
brings to the ear the songs of birds 
babbling warbles as if to celebrate the 
return of life. How utterly spiritless 
are they whose pedantic early minds 
see in all this only the coming crop of 
hay and wheat on farm ; or see with 
mind on stomach more plentiful vege- 
tables on the city market ; or see in 
the forest only the growing logs for the 
insatiable saw! There is life— new 
life, full life, vigorous life all about us ! 
Wle must go out, inhale deeply and let 
our spirits rise when we feel these 
potent appeals of God through His 
wonderful creation, filtering, flooding, 
rushing in through all the senses, the 
avenues of the soul ! 

Such is the setting of Arbor Day! 
Who can resist offering some tribute 
for this triumphant pageant of Nature? 
And what more fitting than the plant- 
ing of a tree? It puts our hearts in 
harmony with the beautiful song of 
life about us. 

Are we perchance unwittingly angels 
of death instead of life in the planting 
of this tree? Too many Arbor Days 
are all fair words and wind up in a tree 
funeral. The songs of happiness 
should be dirges or the solemn re- 
quiem mass. The successful planting 
of a tree requires the adjustment of its 
organs to the forces of nature eager 
to give it sustenance. After taking up 
its tender rootlets so as rudely to 
break them after cutting back the 
crown until its naked truncated stem 
resembles the despised bean-pole, we 
are but hypocrites with our fair words 
and well wishing. A shallow hole and 
covering of barren earth are but the 
final casting in of sods, and the tree is 
interred — not planted. 



The spirit of tree-planting is not 
usually based on any selfish motives, 
for most often we plant that others 
may enjoy. And in this it is the badge 
of greatest service. The limited vision 
of bygone generations imposes on us 
the duty of reconstructing the tree as- 
sociations whether for lawn or forest, 
and in this reconstructing for coming 
generations we have need for the in- 
telligent action coming with special 
training. The results of our work will 
fully ?how only in fifty or one hundred 
years. Yet it is high time it is begun. 

Sometimes we foresters find it a real 
pleasure to get away from our tasks 
which must necessarily be largely 
utilitarian and intensely practical, and 
join with you in the task of tree-plant- 
ing where the aesthetic spirit and the 
spirit of personal association dominate. 
^^■e like to get aw^ay from planting 
embryonic porch pillars, and plaster- 
ing lath, and quartered oak furniture, 
and telephones poles or perchance pine 
coffins; away from planting trees by 
the thousands where each tree planted 
represents less than one cent ; away 
from the feeling that trees possess 
value only in numbers and the indivi- 
dual tree is lost sight of. We are in con- 
stant danger (as one of my cherished 
instructors well said) of acquiring the 
inability to see the beautiful life of a 
tree for the very forest of trees. While 
I have great enthusiasm for the labors 
of the forester, I have a peculiar 
pleasure in here joining you in the 
pleasant task of starting a tree on its 
develonment, where it will possess in- 
dividuality and shed forth its spirit 
of class association with its beauty and 
shade. It wnll receive consideration as 
an individual ministering to the highest 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



things in our lives and not the mere 
furnishing of fuel and lumber. 

Although it would be a greater 
pleasure to suppress for the day tlie 
utilitarian aspects of trees that control 
in forestry practice, the need of a clear- 
er understanding of the situation by 
all the citizens is necessary for that 
general support so essential in a policy 
of forest restoration. 

The Forest Problem 

The motto of every generation of 
patriotic citizen should be so to use 
the natural resources intrusted to them 
that they may hand on to the next gene- 
ration a land unimpaired in comfort and 
producing power. If this can be done 
there will be no poverty ridden China, 
India. Italy, Spain, or Palestine dupli- 
cated in America. Let us see if this 
creed can be made practicable. 

Natural resources group themselves 
readily into three groups : 

A Those consumable but unre- 
newable. 

B Those consumable but renew- 
able. 

C Those self-renewing. 

The first class includes such re- 
sources as coal mines, mines of ores, 
petroleum, natural gas, and in fact all 
mineral resources. The metals are 
used up slowly while the fuel, — coal, 
oil, and gas, are being consumed very 
rapidly. Since these cannot be re- 
placed the best each generation can 
do is to reduce waste to a minimum 
and compensate the later generations 
as much as possible for the stores con- 
sumed, by a permanent contribution to 
their well-being in the form of inven- 
tions, canals, etc., and improved con- 
dition of the renewal factors. 

The second class of natural resources 



that are renewable include the products 
of the soil, forests, agricultural prod- 
ucts, and might include animals and 
fish. These may be propagated and 
kept constant or even increased in sup- 
ply. In fact these resources should be 
increased to compensate for the ex- 
haustion of the coal, gas, oil, etc. 

The third class — those self renewing, 
are the forces of nature such as rain, 
sun, and water supply. These ;will 
take care of themselves as far as con- 
stant quantity is concerned although 
waters must have some care in their 
handling. Water must not be con- 
taminated nor water powers ruined. 

We may now go back to the renew- 
able resources, — agriculture and forests 
particularly, as results of soil culti- 
vation. In the main agriculture with 
us has been improving soils and yields 
constantly with some local exceptions. 
How is it with the forests? Where is 
now "the forest primeval, the murmur- 
ing pines and the hemlocks?" It is 
not necessary to lament the passing of 
the primeval forests but we do 
seriously lament the failure to 
replace it. I need not detail the need 
of forests to you ; the tremendous sup- 
plies of wood products annually neces- 
sary; the furnishing of valuable yields 
from lands otherwise barren ; the fur- 
nishing of homes and a livelihood to 
many families in the forest industries 
who contribute a constant stream of 
mental and bodily vigor to the entire 
nation ; the maintenance of forest cover 
for the benefit of our springs and 
streams ; and although we do not 
claim forests influence climate or rain- 
fall, what scientist or , near-scientist 
dare proclaim that the sweeping away 
of the wide expanse of forest over 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



IS 



-America would not react disastrously 
'on other climatic conditions? 

Out of the 1900 million acres of land 
in the United States exclusive of Alaska 
550 million acres are estimated to be 
wood-land, — only a fraction of which 
now contains merchantable timber. 
We are credited with a supply of 2500 
'to 2700 billion board feet of timber 
:against which we draw some 45 billion 
feet of saw timber plus large quantities 
of other wood supplies each year — and 
this need is growing. Our forests are 
in such a condition (where even forests 
s't'ill appear) that an average of only 
one-eighth of a cord of w^ood is pro- 
-dticed on each acre each year. We are 
tising four times this amount, but our 
forest land is capable of producing 
wTiat we use if we but restore it. We 
hear much of a final timber famine, but 
prices will pinch long before the acute 
famine stage. Note this price compari- 
son: 

Price per 1000 bd. ft. 
i860 191 1 

White pine 

extra quality — rough $24 $100 
A\'hite oak : 

plain 1st and 2ixl quality 11 53-56 
Poplar: 

1st and 2nd 13 61-63 

Hemlock : 

rough 7 20-21 

This rise has been the greater be- 
cause methods of manufacture have 
been cheapened. 

Must v^e wait until dri\en to care 
for our forests? In Pennsylvania we 
have less than twenty-seven million 
acres of land of which approximately 
nine million are forest land. That is 
one-third is forest. In i860 and 1870 
Pennsylvania was first or second 



among the lumber-producing states of 
the United States. Now she is four- 
teenth or lower. The wood product 
from her nine million acres should 
bring to forest labor fifty million dol- 
lars annually. Instead a fraction of 
that comes in. The state has bought 
one million acres of land at $2.24 per 
acre. This land is generally in fair 
condition as to forest cover in the 
southern counties and devastated in 
the northern counties. It would be 
worth $50 per acre in a satisfactorily 
forested condition even at present 
prices. In thenext twenty-five years 
the state should spend fifty million dol- 
lars on her forests at the lowest calcu- 
lation and even then they will be but 
half under good forest. Our nine million 
acres of forest should be worth 450 
million dollars and support more than 
50,000 families in the forest, 100,000 
more in wood working industries, or a 
total population to receive their direct 
living from the forest of over half a 
million. The state must become more 
aggressive in its policy and private 
forest owners must do their share if it 
is to be done. The state should own 
at least five million acres out of the 
total nine million. 

Can this reforestation be done with 
financial success? We are now re- 
foresting land at a cost of $7 to $12 
per acre, planting 1200 to 1300 trees 
per acre or six feet by six feet. The 
size of these trees is seen by these 
specimens I here hold before you. In 
fifty years each acre should have cost 
at 4% compound interest vmder a more 
rational system of taxes about $75 and 
an acre of wdiite pine should have on 
it thirty M bd. ft. of timber and an 
acre of red oak fifteen M bd. ft., giving 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



a cost of $2.50 to $5 per thousand feet 
for growing. Slower growing species 
would have a higher cost. White pine 
to-day is worth $8— $12 per M ft. "on 
the stump" and red oak as much so that 
even now prices are high enough to 
grow the fast growing species at a 
profit. However, let me warn you 
against the swindling claims of get- 
rich-quick eucalyptus and catalpa 
growers ! 

Pennsylvania farms, improved by 
private owners for the increased yields 
will immediately repay the outlay. 
Pennsylvania mines — oil and gas — are 
yielding a large monopoly profit and 
they should bear a large weight of 
public tax to furnish permanent im- 
provements to water-power, roads, and 
forests as a contribution to the per- 
manent wealth of the state to com- 
pensate for the exhaustion of these 
natural resources. The private 
forests must be taxed lightly (since the 
same crop is taxed for fifty or more 
years before it is ripe for harvest) if 
private owners are to grow forests. 
Even then the long wait and difficulty 
of protection will force the govern- 
ments to manage large parts of the 
forest. Pennsylvania needs better 
roads, yes but even much more, 
Pennsylvania needs better forests ! 

Now what are you going to do 
about your share in this larger Arbor 



Day for the welfare of your state? Will 
these be fair words and a forest funeral 
in a larger sense? What can you do? 
Let me tell you. Have your institu- 
tion pass a resolution asking your Rep- 
resentative in Congress at Washing- 
ton and Pennsylvania's Senators to 
support National Forestry and oppose 
the parceling out of the National 
Forests to the states. Further, pass a 
resolution asking your Representative 
and Senator at Harrisburg to support 
forestry and particularly the Auxiliary 
Forest Reserve bills now before the 
state legislature. Do this and you ob- 
serve Arbor Day in a much ' wider 
sense than the planting of a single 
tree ! You then serve your state and 
nation as well as your Alma Mater and 
class association. 

Finally, what could be more fitting 
for a college class to leave as a tok- 
en to their alma mater a tree that will 
start on its unfolding even as you are 
about to start forth, transplanted as it 
were along the wayside of life, some to 
become sturdy oaks, or well formed 
pines, developing slowly but with firm 
roots striking deep into the nourishing 
soil of Religion, Truth, and Knowledge. 
Let us hope none may be reckoned as 
thorns or storm wrecked trees fit only 
to be hewn out from among your asso- 
ciates. Rather may each stand fast as 
a sentinel pine high up on Life's peak. 



-@^1^<^- 




EDITORIAL BOARD. 

KALTH W. SCHLOSSER, '11, Editor in-Chief 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 



Orville Z. Becker, '15 School Notes 

KoRA L. Keber, '11 Horaerian ISews 

Mary Scheaffek, '13: K. L. S. News 

Leah Sheaffer, '09 Alumoi Notes 



C. L. \I ARriN, '13 Exchanges 

J. D. Reber, '14 Bus. Mgr. 

A. L. Reber, '13 Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Daisy R. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



Our College Times is published monthly durins^ the Academic year by Elizabethtown Codege. 

Arrearage on subscription to this paper is charged. 

Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates: — Kifty cents per year; ten cents per copy; five years for $2.00. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1901», at the Elizabethtown Postotiice. 



Our College Campus 

The many showers of April and the 
beautiful warm days of the last few 
weeks have called loudly to sleeping 
Nature. Spring has again given a 
Nature. Spring has again given prom- 
ising fore taste of a luxuriant sum- 
strikingly evinced than on our Col- 
lege Campus. The maple trees now 
about fifteen years old are being 
rapidly clothed in garments of various 
shades of green ; the different class 
trees are also sending forth their 
foliage with the exception of one which 
died and should be replaced. The 



lilacs are now blooming in profusion 
and the rest of the shrubbery is put- 
ting on the vesture of the spring season. 
But to what avail is all this effort 
of Nature, when the entire lawn is 
literally covered with dandelion and 
and other weeds, when there is no at- 
tempt made to sow lawn grass seed? 
Nature is striving against great odds, 
yet she is never weary in her well- 
doing, and it is simply impossible to 
have a beautiful campus when she 
alone is at work. Our janitor has 
heretofore taken great pains in trying 
to get a good set of grass on the lawn 



II 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and has succeeded remarkably well, — 
indeed, he is to be congratulated for 
the way in which he kept it last year, 
but there are places in front of Alpha 
Hall where a lawn mower alone will 
not form a lawn. Besides, there is 
some grading to be done within the 
walks before a permanent lawn is 
started. AVe do not intend to criti- 
cise any one connected with the super- 
intendence of the College Campus in 
the past, for we believe they have done 
much under the circumstances of the 
past ; but we believe the time has 
come for us to have permanent grading 
done, especially within the elliptical 
drive-way and in the maole groves. 

Not only should all this ground be 
graded but it should have sown on it 
lawn grass seed, and then some one 
put in charge of this section of the 
campus. No one will dispute the fact 
that this would greatly enhance the 
value of the College property, that it 
would be an inestimable aesthetic 
value to the student body and the 
faculty, and that it would be a strong 
inducement to secure students. Since 
such values accrue to this project we 
think it worth our consideration. 

Of course such an undertaking as 
proposed above, will require some 
funds. These, however, we believe 
will be forthcoming, if some one will 
rise to the occasion and push the pro- 
ject. As an example of what might 
be done in this work we allude to the 
work of Mr. E. G. Diehm, on the 



'iake project." He informed us that 
in one day he raised about one hundred 
dollars toward the building of the lake ; 
and all these subscriptions were re- 
ceived in the vicinity of Lititz. 

Now we would like to see each loyal 
student of Elizabethtown College 
solicit contributions in their respective 
communities the first few weeks after 
Commencement and send them in not 
later than July 5. Then the grading 
could be done during the summer and 
the seed sown before the coming fall. 
If the funds would not all be needed 
for the lawn, the remainder might be 
used in the building of the lake. 

Students, we earnestly desire that 
you take up this matter and show that 
your heart is in the work on College 
Hill. If one student raised one hun- 
dred dollars in one day in one com- 
munity, what could be done by one 
hundred or more loyal students in 
three weeks? Be loyal! Spend 
several days in the interests of the 
school among you neighbors and 
friends! We hope to see a caucus held 
by the student body which will desig- 
nate several advanced students to act 
with the faculty and the Superinten- 
dent of the College Grounds in bring- 
ing about this much needed improve- 
ment. Students, let it be said of you 
in years to come, "It was the students 
of the Spring Term of 1913 who gave 
Elizabethtown College her beautiful 
campus." 




5 


















t 



L 



S 



When April steps aside for May, 
Like diamonds all the rain-drops 
glisten ; 
Fresh violets open every day : 

To some new bird each hour we 
listen. 

— Lucy Larcom. 

'Tis like the birthday of the world, 
When earth was born in bloom ; 
The light is made of many dyes, 
The air is all perfume : 
There's crimson buds, and white and 

blue. 
The very rainbow showers 
Have turned to blossoms where they 

fell. 
And sown the earth with flowers. 

-Hood. 

Spring- has come to College Hill in 
all its fullness and beauty. The 
balminess and softness in the warming 
air ; the ever increasing perfumes and 
variegated colors on shrub and 
tree ; the sounds from neighboring 
hills and vales reminding many of us 
of our homes on the farm ; and all the 
delights and high aspirations of spring 
are making school days on College 



Hill a joy since the cold and gloom 
of Winter has fled. 

Outdoor sports have usurped the 
place of basket ball and other indoor 
games. The tennis courts and the 
baseball diamond are the centers of 
many enjoyable and interesting oc- 
casions. 

The tennis association reorganized 
at the beginning of this term and has 
for its new and able President, C. J. 
Rose. '^' 

Mr. Kreider who is Treasurer of the 
association will sooner or later be the 
guest of all of its members and will 
direct his conversation along financial 
lines. The association at the present 
time has four tennis courts which are 
in fine playing condition under the 
supervision of our new President and 
plans have been made for the addition? 
of two other courts so as to meet the 
demands for this kind of sport. 

The baseball season has also opened. 
Preliminary practice before the open- 
ing claimed much interest and time 
for some. Two teams have been or- 
ganized thus far ; namely, the Kulpites 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and the Herrites, being under the 
managements of Captains W. K. Kulp 
and I. R. Herr. The teams have play- 
ed four games, three of which were 
won by the iKulpites. The scores are: 

Kulpites Herrites 

First Game 17 3 

Second Game 6 7 

Third Game 10 5 

Fourth Game 11 3 

Kulpites Herrites 

Burgess, c. A. L. Reber, i b. 

Shenk, i b. Geyer, c. 

Lineaweaver, 2 b. Herr, p. 
Kulp, p. Kentzel, s s. 

Brandt, 3 b. Kreider. c f. 

Shank, s. s. Engle, 3 b. 

Hershey, c f. Royer, 2 b. 

Rose, 1 f. Hackman, I f. 

Shellv, r f. Merkey, r f 

Diehm, 1 f. 
Edris, s s. 

Although Spring is here with all its 
splendor and joys long looked for by 
the students yet it has also brought 
with it its annual disease which is so 
contagious and which spreads as 
rapidly among students as among other 
iieople : namely. Spring fever. Many 
are made to like Riley when he so 
artistically said : 

"In Spring, when the green gits back 
in the trees, 
And the sun comes out and stays, 
And yer boots pull on with a good 
tight squeeze, 
And you think of yer bare-foot days ; 
When you ort to work and you want 
to not, 
And you and your wife agrees 
It's time to spade up the garden-lot, 
When the green gits back in the 
trees. 
Well ! work is the least o' my idees 
When the green, you know, gits 
back in the trees." 



The Summer Term. 

The sixth annual summer term at 
Elizabethtown College will open June 
30 and continue six weeks. 

AIM — The value of the summer term 
is so great that it has come to Stay. 
Although only a few have availed them- 
selves of its advantages very ex- 
cellent work has been done because of 
the small classes and the conditions 
favoring thoroughness of work. Per- 
sons preparing for college, or those 
pursuing a regular college course, and 
those who are pursuing regular cour- 
ses in this school will find rich oppor- 
tunities for furthering their studies. 

INSTRUCTION — The student's 
program consists of two or three 
studies to which he devotes all of his 
time thus enabling him to accomplish 
from a third to a half year's work in 
these studies. The recitations last one 
hour and all work satisfactorly com- 
pleted will receive credit towards the 
completion of a course of study. 

EXPENSES^ — In preparatory sub- 
jects the tuition is ten dollars ; in col- 
lege studies, fifteen dollars, payable at 
the middle of the term. Text books 
may be rented or purchased at the col- 
lege book room. Room rent for the 
summer term will be at catalogue rates. 
Those desiring to board at the college 
may make arrangements with Mrs. E. 
G. Reber. The tennis court, gymna- 
sium, librar}^ and reading room will be 
accessible to the summer students free 
of charge. 

Those interested in availing them- 
selves of the opportunity afforded, by 
the summer term should make their 
wants known early so that proper ar- 
rangements can be made. Make your 
wants known to the President. 



'^■■jfi 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



K. L. S. Notes. 

On March 7, the Keystone Literary 
Society met in regular executive ses- 
sion. The program rendered was as 
follows : 
Music — Instrumental Solo, 

Edna Wenger. 
Select Reading — "The Dutchman's 

Telephone," J. N. Gibble. 

Debate — Resolved, That there should 
be an educational qualification for 
sufifrage. The afifirmative speakers 
were Ruth Landis and Harry Moy- 
er; the negative, Ada Douty and H. 
M. Eberly. The judges decided 
in favor of the affirmative. 
Music— Girls' Quartet, "A Father's 

Lullaby." 
Declamation — "Why I came to Col- 
lege," Ephraim Meyer. 

The following literary program was 

rendered on March 14: 

Music — "America." 

Essay — "Some General Principles of 
Teaching," C. J. Rose. 

Music — "Come, see the place where 
the Lord lay," C. L. Martin. 

Address — "The Conception of Educa- 
tion," C. L. Martin. 

Recitation — "One Niche the Highest," 

Ira Coble. 

Literary Echo — Sara Replogle. 

The Society met in Literary session 
April 4. The nevv^ officers were inau- 
gurated and the president delivered his 
inaugural address. 

The following program was then 
rendered. 
Select Reading — Selection from Mark 

Twain, "Visit to Niagara," Daniel 

Hofifman. 
Music — Instrumental Duet, Leah 

Sheaffer and Gertrude Kabel. 



Soliloquy — "Selections from Macbeth" 

Harry Moyer. 

Debate — Resolved, That the members 
of the President's Cabinet should be 
elected by the people. The affirma- 
tive speakers were Mabel Hoffman 
and J. Bufifenmyer ; the negative, 
Mary Minnich and John Graham. 
The judges decided in favor of the 
negative. 

Music — Vocal Solo, "Shadowtown," 

Sarah Moyer. 

Oration — "Little Beginnings," 

Jacob Gingrich. 

Literary Echo — J. S. Lineaweaver. 

Homerian News. 

The members of this society are 
constantly increasing. Of those who 
have come for the Spring Term, Agnes 
M. Ryan and Florence S. Miller were 
recently elected as active Homerians. 
We welcome these n,ew members and 
hope they will become thoroughly in- 
terested in our society work.. 

The following program was ren- 
dered to the public on the evening of 
May 2. 
Music. 

Oration — Christ L. Martin. 
Solo — Elizabeth Kline. 
Address— Prof. I. Z. Hackman. 
Recitation — "The Fall of Pemberton 

Mill," Florence S. Miller. 
Music. 
Speaker's Address— "Life Lessons 

from Flowers," Leah M. Sheafifer. 
Critic's Remarks. 



The Library Committee has arrang- 
ed for another lecture to be given on 
May the sixteenth in the College 
Chapel by Dr. C. C. Ellis of Hunting- 
don, Pa. His subject will be "Dollars 
and Dunces" and promises to be an in- 
terestine one. 




Alumni Notes 

Since the opening of the Spring 
Term Agnes M. Ryan, Florence Mil- 
ler, Nora Reber, Irene Sheetz, Fred 
ly. Burgess, and Walter Eshelman 
have enrolled as students. They are 
pursuing more advanced work and 
several are preparing to take the ex- 
amination for permanent certificates. 
Orpha L. Harshberger had intended 
to return also but her mother's ill- 
ness prevented her from doing so. 

Miss Emma S. Miller, 'ii, w^as re- 
cently graduated from the Bethany 
Bible School of Chicago. 

A baby boy, Edgar Haas, was born, 
in March to Mr. and Mrs. Chas A. 
Schwenk of Eoganton, Clinton County. 
This young man is now an applicant 
for entry on the cradle roll. 

James Breitigan of Lititz and Will 
E. Glassmire of Palmyra attended the 
lecture given by Dr. D. W. Kurtz on 
April 24. 

Mary E. Hertzler, '05, read a very 
interesting and instructive paper on 
"Domestic Science" at the Anniversary 
of the Literary Societies, It was 
much appreciated by all because of the 



fact that she, herself, intends to 
practice soon what she preached that 
night. The president on this occasion 
was Will E. Glasmire, '07; the secre- 
tary, Mamie B. Keller, '12. Gertrude 
Newcomer, '08, gave us a recitation. 

Misses Keller and Newcomer spent 
a few days following the meeting, 
visiting friends in town and at the 
College. 

One Alumna was present and after 
the meeting expressed herself as feel- 
ing like a stranger. She lives near the 
College but hadn't visited it for quite 
a long time. We were glad to have 
her come back again and hope that 
others guilty of the same offense will 
follow her example. 

Every member of the Association, as 
well as all others, will feel very sorry 
to learn that Olive A. Myers, '10, has 
been advised by a very noted specialist 
of Baltimore to change climate, for her 
health. She will leave for Colorado 
on April 29, where she expects to re- 
main for some time. Her address will 
be Elizabeth, Colorado, in care of W. 
F. Foster. Surely we send with her 
our very best wishes, hoping that 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



she will like her new home and that 
she will soon make many friends and 
regain her health. 

The Executive Committee is busy. 
The program for June is about ar- 
ranged. Arrangements are being 
made for the other activities of the 
Association. Be on the lookout for an 
announcement of the supper. 

If any one has any suggestions con- 
cerning the revision of our Alumni 
constitution please forward the same 
to Prof. Meyer or Prof. Schlosser. 
The committee ap})ointed for this pur- 



pose is about to take up the work. 

The officers of the Association at 
present are: Pres., Jno. Miller; First 
V. President., B. F. Waltz; Cor. Sec, 
Irene Wise; Rec. Sec, Daisy P. 
Rider ; Treas., Condry Long. Address 
all communications to Irene Wise, 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Every member of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation should be planning to come to 
Commencement the entire week if 
possible, and especially to the Alumni 
functions. 

Let us make this the banner vear. 



Resolutions of Sympathy 
Since our Heavenly F"ather has seen 
fit in his wisdam to call from her earth- 
ly home the mother of our friend and 
fellow student, Mary A. ScheafTer, 

Be it resolved. That we the faculty 
and the students of Elizabethtown Col- 
lege de hereby sincerely tender our 
heart-felt sympathy to the bereaved 
family. 

Further, That we commend the sor- 
rowing to our Heavenly Father who 
is the great sympathizer and com- 
forter. 

That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the family and the same be 
published in Our College Times. 
Lydia Stauffer 
Jacob H, Gingrich 
Nora L. Reber. 

Committee. 



Semi-Annual Statement 

Statement of ownership and man- 
agement, etc., of Our College Times 
as required by Act of Aug. 24, 1912. 

Our College Times is printed month- 
ly except during August and Septem- 
ber. 

Editor, Ralph W. Schlosser, Eliz- 
abethtown, Pa. Business Managers, 
J. D. Reber, Elizabethtown, Pa., and 
A. L. Reber, Elizabethtown Pa., 

Publisher, Elizabethtown College. 

Affirmed to and subscribed before 
me this sixteenth day of April 1913. 

H. K. Ober, Notary Public 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 

My commission expires, March iS 
1918. 

Read "Pluck the Rose Above You,'* 
in the Philomathean Monthly. 




If a school paper carries with it or 
portrays the characteristics of the 
school that published it, the literary de- 
partment is one of the essentials of 
such portrayals. Man's success in life 
depends largely on what he thinks ; if 
he has been receiving strong influence 
from the school, depends largely on 
the school. The result of such 
thought is found in the literary depart- 
ment of the school paper. Hence our 
first statement. 

Knowing this the editor of a school 
paper asks himself, "What constitutes 
a good literary department?" (There 
are some editors who are not "know- 
ing" and who, • do not "ask.") 
Shall the articles all be of a philosophic 
nature? Shall they be scientific? 
Shall they be descriptive or narrative? 
These and a dozen other questions 
arise in the mind of a thinking editor. 

Now then the ideal literar}^ depart- 
ment of a paper should have as nearly 
as possible an equal amount of each 
of the main types of literary produc- 
tions. Not only should this be found, 
but the productions should of them- 
selves not lack that which makes good 
literary quality. Some papers we find 
have a superabundance of love stories, 
poorly written and not worth read- 
ing. This seems to portray that the 



editor in his judgment of the articles 
sacrificed good taste for love's sake. 
Again other articles are found which 
are unnatural and not true to life, thus 
showing that the author wrote because 
he felt duty bound to do so rather than 
because he could not keep from it. 

In conclusion we would call for a 
literary department of rich, well-writ- 
ten articles, with each phase of literary 
work properly emphasized. 

The Clipper— "A Thrilling Boot 
Ride," by Herbert Harris is very well 
written,— short and interesting. The 
literary department of this paper is es- 
pecially well handled. Some college 
papers would do well in modelling 
after this paper in this respect. If the 
humorous department and the athlet- 
ic news were treated efficiently the 
paper would be ideal. 

The Purple and Gold is a very neat 
paper bue there is not ver}- much to 
it. 

The Ursinus Weekly makes its regu- 
lar visits to us. It is bubbling over 
with news of its kind. 

The Villa Marian. This paper is 
ideal in appearance, content, and 
general make-up,— a criticism we 
rarely give. Its articles are well- 
written, especially those on "Modern 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



Extravagance" and "Is Chivalry 
Dead?"" "Rain Drops"' is a beautiful 
little poem. We see no room for non- 
sense in this paper. 

The Blue and Gold gives us a fair 
literary department. Its appearance 
is especially neat. A child of ten could 
edit these exchange articles. That ex- 
change editor needs a waking-up. 

The M. H. Aerolith is worthy of the 
name Old Reliable. It is always neat. 
Its literary work is commendable. Its 
stories are worth reading. 

The Comet, like many comets, can 



be viewed only a short time then it 
is gone. 

If we were to name a lot of the best 
papers of the dozens we receive they 
would be these: The Susquehanna, 
The Albright Bulletin, The Gettysburg 
Weekly, and The Villa Marian. If 
you wish to be on the list do as well 
as they do and you will be there. 

The High School Journal of Grove 
City talks little but says much. 

"Grandmother's Quilt" in the Lin- 
den Hall Echo is worth readiny- twice. 



Fresh and Smoked Meats 



S. IM 

S. Market St. 



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0pp. Exchange Bank 



Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. None 
Better, Fe-w as Goodi 

D. H. BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN 



The baker who knows how. Phone or drop a postal 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



CENTRAL 



MEAT 



MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



H. H. GOOD 



EMZABETHTOWN 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 

R. H. SHISSLER. 



The Pratt 
Teackers' Agency 

70 Fifth Avesne 
Ne-w York 



Receives calls at all seasons for college 
and normal graduates, specialists and 
other teachers in colleges, public and 
private schools in all parts of the coun- 
trv. 

Advises parents about schools. 

WM. O. PRATT, Manager 



Plain Suits, Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats. 

GANSMAI\S'S 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange St;., Lancaster, Pa. 



Elizabethtown Dental 
Parlors 

Office Closed Thursday 
and Friday 

S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 

Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



26 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



jyniiBiiHiii;w!iiwiiiBiiiiniii:H>iiini*»miiii'Bi'S''''*''||>|| 

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m Fraternity Jewelry Medals ■ 

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DENTIST 

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Call to make appointments 
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ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



WE DO IT RIGHT 

Shoe Repairing 

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F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
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Horseshoeing a Specialty. 

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J. GROFF & SONS 

eat Market 

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Fry 



— if you want to. Yes, in any posi- 
tion, any pocket. 

Boys: carry the Parker Jack Knife 
Pen in your trousers pocket along 
with your keys. 

Girls: carry it in the pocket of 
your white blouse. 

Play football with it, — basketball, 
tonnis, hockey. It's on the job the 
minute you want to write, without 
leaving a pinhead spot of ink any- 
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Write? Just im gine a pen of 
glass that melts to ink as you slids it 
across paperl That's the way it writes. 

Price $2.50 up. Get one on trial. 
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Mention Our College Times When Writing. 27 



1900 1912 

IT PA YS TO ED UCA TE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 

SEVEN REASONS : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Etjuipment. 

For further particulars, address 

Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN PA. 



28 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-Made Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 



North East Corner Centre SqiJare,, 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



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Bell anil Ind. Pliones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 

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CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Young 

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W. R. Ashenfelter | 

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CAKES 

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FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
will convince. Work guaranteed. Prices 
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sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

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We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
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Lancaster, Pa. 



I H. H. BRAND! I 

♦ t 

J Dealer in a 

♦ ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL J 

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♦ — I 

♦ f 

♦ Elizabethtown, - - Penna. T 



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THE ''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year. Sample Copies Freer>^ 



(T 



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J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam l^aundry. 
Shipped every Wednesday 



^ 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



-.J 



Sporting Goods 



Post Cards 



Agent for all jierioHicals. 

Pocket cutlery, toys, nov-elties, etc. 

P^ine confections. 

H. K. Oorsheimer 

Bell 'Phone 38-3 
On the Square, Elizabethtown. Pa. 



School Supplies 



Stationery 



John A. Fisher 

BARBER 

Centre Square, - Elizabethtow^n, Pa 



^^^<K^i 



IDS. H. RIDER & SON I 



AGENCY FOR 



SPALDING'S 



I 

♦ 
I 

I Baseball i Tennis Goods \ 



F 



T 
U 
R 




C. B. KLIE^E 

CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Elizabethtown, Pa, 



GEO. A. FISHER 

HARDWARE 

Automobiles 
Pttonoyraptis and 
Records 
F. P. GAS PLANTS 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



.♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« ♦♦« ^^^^^^^^•♦♦♦^♦^ 

t ELIZABETHTOWN t 



ROLLER mills! 

J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. ♦ 

Manufacturer of Best Grades of ♦ 

FLOUR AND FEED 

Highest Cash Prices paid for grain, 
hay and straw 



♦ ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PEN\A 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦« 



30 



Our Advertisers arc Worthy of ^our Patronage. 



A.A.ABELE 



The Bee Hive Store 



I 



South Market and'»Bainbridge Streets, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Dry Goods,Notions, Shoes, Carpets, Draperies and an Up-to-Date 
Gent's and Ladies' Furnishings 

^'SOMETHING NEW EVERY DAY" 



line of 




The Duplex 

Recommends Literary 
and Commercial teachers 
Secretaries and Account- 
ants. Schools for sale. 
Circurlars free. Write 
for further information. 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Lunches Telephones. 

D. W. MIESSE 

Baker and Confectioner 

123 N. Queen St. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Ice Cream Water Ice 



D. G. BRiNSER 



Goal 



Grain, Flour, Feed, 
Seeds, Hay, Straw > 
and Fertilizer. \ 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 

5 A farmer once to a certain age ^ 

A In the Lunch Room Business did en- ^ 

2 gage. (!% 

5 T'was Nissley. 

£ Thousands of people now are fed, 

2 Pure, delicious, quick. Enough said. 

TRY NISSLEY 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 9 

LANCASTER, PA. 9 



Ursinus College 

COLLEGEVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 

(24 miles from Philadelphia.) 

Orjianized and administered under the Grnup Sys- 
tem of Instruction, providing both liberal culture and 
special preparation for the varKJUS vocations, an 
arrangement preienting exceptional advantages for 
efficiency and economy All groups open to women 
as well as men Write for special buUftin and 
descriptive pamphlet. 

A. Edwin Keigwin D.D., President. 
Geo. Leslie Omwake, Pd.D., Vice-Pres. 




I SpaidingSporting Goods | 

^ Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, ^ 

1 Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic ♦ 

♦ Shoes. Kodaks .and Cameras, de- ♦ 

4 veloping and finishing. a 



H. B. H E R R 
30-32 West King Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 



=JII 



IF ITS MUSIC OR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, WE HAVE IT! 



IkirR Sobnson & Co. 



16-18 West King Street, 

iiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiniiiiiBiiiwiiiiBiiii 



MUSIC HALL 

LANCASTER, PA. 

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***** 

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Mail Orders Solicited for 
Books and Bibles 

THE BOOK STORE 
i. FALKENSTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. I 



iPaiiUiuG anb Ipapev 
Ibanging 

AMOS B. DRACE 



ind. 'Phone. 



Bell 'Phone 



CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 

Catalogues a Specialty 

311 W. Grant St., LANCASTER, PA. 



REBEk WACOI^S! 

•is the cry of man and horse. The 
horse says "It pulls so easy" and the 
man says "It rides so nice and lasts 
so long." So come my neighbor, get 
yourself such an outfit and be pleased 
yet more than that. 

REBER WAGON WORKS 
Centreport, Pa. 



r 



S. G. GRAYBILL 



==^ 




^: 



College Hill Dairy 

Fresh milk and cream daily. Ail milk 
tested for children; free from tuberculosis 

HOTELS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED 



^ 



TAKE YOURj 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday mornmg. 
Returns Wednesday and Friday afternoon. 

CALL AT 
RALPH GROSS SHAVING PARLOR 
Conducted on sanitary principles. 

Massaging a Specialty. 
Agency of FIrst-Class Laundry. 
EMZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



3 O. iV. HEISEY 

•^ Provisions, Groceries, CS, Choice Candies 



:^ HEISEY BUIIiDING 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. ^; 



^(f\'f>(f>(f>(f>(fy(f>'f>(fMf>(f\(f\(fy(f>(f\(f>i>(fy(f>ff>(f\(f^(f>(fv 



32 



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Elizabettitown Exchange 

Bank 



Transacts a general banking business, pays in- 
terest on time deposits, solicits your patronage 



OFFICERS 



A. G. HEISEY, Pres. 



ALLEN A. COBLE. Vice Pres 



J. H. ESHLEMAN. Cashier 



DIRECTORS 



A. G. Heisey Jos. G. Heisey B. H. Greider, H. J. Gisb 

Allen A. Coble Dr. H. K. Blough Henry E. Landis J. H. Bucb 

Dr. A M. Kalbach Geo. D. Boggs E. E. Hernly 



I P. N. Kraybilll 

* Both 'Phones % 

Rheems. - Penn'a | 

Dealer in ^ 

Groceries, Dry Goods, Notions, % 
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers * 

— 5 

Hardware, Paints, Oils, Turpen- | 
tine and Glass ^ 

J 

Oilcloth, Linoleums, Matting, Win- 
dow Shades and Strips 



9il;liBiliiHI!ll!SillllOi: 



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Soliciting a Share of Your Business * 



er s 
Corsets 

are the only corsets that are en- 
dorsed so fully and strongly to us. 

Guaranteed to shape fashion- 
ably, to fit comfortably, and not 
to rust, break or tear. 

You connot say any more in 
favor of a corset excepting to give 
its price — 

$1.00 to $2.00 Per Pair 

If we could say just the things 
that we say about Warner's Rust- 
Proof Corsets, it would make 
any corset worth while ; but 
WARNER'S are the only corsets 
we can make this absolute state- 
ment regarding. 

Huntzberger-Winters Co. 

ELIZABETHTOIVN, PA. 



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"It's not what we say we do; 
It's what we do." 

How often have you read the promises of men? 

How often have you paid the pena Ity afterwards? 

We often question the advisability of telling about 
the clothes we sell, for talk is cheap. However, there is' 
only one way to interest the man who doesn't know us 
and that is to advertise. So, we are forced to use this 
method of getting in touch with you. 

This advertisement is not going to say a single word 
about our clothes. Its only object is to invite you to 
visit our shop. When you arrive here we'll show you. 

Can we hope to see you soon? 

"FOLLOW THE ARROW" TO 

S. M. MYERS & CO. 

CLOTHIERS — FURNISHERS — HATTERS 
12 East King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Hertzler's Department Store 




Your needs supplied at satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, Groceries, Ready-to-Wear Clothing tor Men 
and Women of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oilcloth 
Shoes, Etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-Measure 

CLOTHING 

International Tailoring Co., New York. 
American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chicago. 
Up-to-Date Samples on Hand. 



Black Cat 
Hosiery 



HERTZLER BROS. & CO. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN. Cashier 



U. S. DEPOSITORY 



Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits, SI57, 000.00 

> 

4: General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid on special 

deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 



«l 



4' ]i^ti w:j ii/ - ■ ..DIRECTORS • • "'-^i^P Ji:;^^^ ^ 

"i ',;-■' -■„ ■ . , ■ >, / jf.. 

#"W. S. Smith Elmer W.,Strickler v>-,'r^r'i Peter N. TOitt 

J. S. Risser v>'--> ..v. ^ ^ Qe^r 

' 'Amps G. CoiAo . -■'ivCijIC'^ls^i:-.?' . - ■ B, E^.^^Co^e 



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ANNOUNCEMENT ! 



y^/^^WWVN AA ^S^ 



£f 



A great many people are 
going to have their Photos 
taken this Spring, Why? 
Never before in the history 
of Lancaster county have 
they had a photographer 
that makes you look like 
yourself. . This Carl 
Schlotzhauer does to perfec- 
tion. The only studio of 
its kind in this part of the 
state outside of Philadel- 
phia. 



X^/ 



We Ar« Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made to Order 



STUDIO 

163 N. Queen St. 

} OPPOSITE HOTEL WHEATLAND 
Lancaster, Pa. 



Plain 
Clothing 

In This Country 



When in Lancaster it will pay 
you to visit ours, the only 
Clothing Store in that city that 
has One Price to All and gives 
discounts to none. See us for 

MEN'S READY MADE AND 
MADE TO ORDER 



Clothing 

AND 

Furnishing 





^ViTf/V;, 




DIE ALTB KERSCHE BEEM 5 

RAILROADS AS A FACTOR IN CIVILIZATION .... 6 

THE RENAISSANCE 8 

SUN YAT SEN— THE SAVIOR OF CHINA 10 

POSSIBILITIES OF WORLD PEACE 12 

THE WITCH AGENCY IN MACBETH 14 

SHANNON LECTURES' 15 

EDITORIAL 16 

SCHOOL NOTES 19 

K. L. S. NOTES ; . . . 21 

HOMERIAN NOTES 22 

ALUMNI 'NOTES • • • •. 23 

EXCHANGES V .:..:.•.......'.. 24 






n:::u/.^- 



®ur CoU^0^ (Smm 



Vol. X 



Eliza BjfTHTOWN, Pa , June, 1918 



No. 9 



Die Alte Kersche Beem 



J. H. Longenecker. 



Es is nau iwer fufzig Yohr 
Das ich tn klenes Buweli war 
In meini Unschuldkleed daheem. 
Dort newe am Hiwel war's alt Haus 
Un juscht en wenig weiter naus 
Zwe grosze alte Kerschebeem. 

"Sis viel mit selie Beem connect — 
Im Pennsylvaenia Dialekt 
Daet ich dir's gern verzaehle, 
Un awer ich kann nau, schun g'seh 
Dasz ich gar viel musz iwergeh, 
Die Zeit un ^^'orte fehle. 

Frueh-johrs do is en Lebens-saft 
In stiller wunderbarer Kraft 
In selle Beem nuf gstiege. 
Schnell ware sie gekleed in W'eis 
So herrlich wie en Paradeis 
W^ier kann sell Pikter ziege. 

Die Ehme hen mit grosem Fleis 

Der lang Dag gsucht fer ihre Speis 

In selle schoene Blumme ; 

Den Honig hen sie kuenstlich g'stord. 

In feine Rose ufbewahrt 

Fern' kalder Dag zu kumme. 

Die Amschle hen en Nest gebaut 
So fei un schlick", s'war just abaut 
Karios wie sie's verspunne ; 
No hen sie Eunge raus gebruet 
Un frueh un spot en herrlich Lied 
Uf selle Beem dort gsunge. 

En schlaue Katz die schleicht dort naus 
Veristeckt im Gras am Brunnehaus, 
Basjz uf. nau gebts mol Sache ! 
Diejjunge Voegel sin schier flick, 
Dont fliegt eens raus zu seim Unglueck 
D e vHei n d h ots^ ^eh-ttfi 4m -Rach e. 



Sel awer bringt en groser Smertz 
In selle Voegel ihrem Hertz 
Guck just mol wie sie fliege ! 
Sie zanke jaemmerlich dert rum, 
Die schlau alt Katz die springt davun 
Un lost sich net bewege. 

Im Shatte dort der Schleifstee stehf 
Un wanns als an die Haiet geht 
No geht mer s'erst ans Schleife ; 
Der Stee dreht hart, die Sens is dol, 
Sell is ken Fon ich wees es wol 
S' vertreibt de Buwe 's peife. 

:{; ^ ^ Hi Hi 

Sie sage mir es gebt en Land 

Wo Abschieds-schmertz ist unbekannt, 

Ke Ferre-well, ke Suende ; 

En weit geziertes Blumefeld, 

En Paradies, en Himmelswelt, 

Wo Truwel net zu finde. 

Es werd ah gsat es waer en Stadt 
Die wunnerbare Grunde hat 
Mit Edelstein gebauet, 
Mit Lebensbaeume an der Stras 
Die man als ein durscheinend Glas 
Im Lichte Gottes schauet. 

Wo Freunde sich erfreuen sehr 
Zu treffen an dem glaesernern Meer 
Un Gottes Harfen bringen, 
Wo ewig keine Trennung mehr, 
Wo's ganze Blut-erkaufte Heer 
Ein Triumphlied anstimmen. 

Wo alle um den Lebensbaum 
Nur Cott anbeten un das Lamm— 
O was fuer Wunder-Namen 
O halleluia, selige Zeit ! 
Fuer die. zu solchem Glueck bereit, 
^D .halleluia^Amen, . _ . 



Railroads As a Factor in Civilization. 



J. D. Reber. 



The introduction of railroads created 
a new world. So accustomed have we 
become to a civilization with railways 
that it requires conscious effort to real- 
ize the economic, social, and moral 
influences which have emanated from 
them. Railroads are a factor which 
cannot be spared. Without them a 
city like New York could not exist, 
for its people could get neither food 
nor materials for their shops and 
factories. Without them the western 
prairies and plains could have but a 
scattering people, for the grain and 
cattle could not be marketed and manu- 
factured products could not come in. 
Life would be reduced to a primitive 
stage. 

Civilization means variety of food, 
clothing, furniture, tools, objects of art, 
and leisure to do one thing well. Ex- 
change of products alone makes this 
possible. The higher life of man is 
therefore built on transportation. This 
principle is thus given by Macaulay: 
,'Of all inventions, the alphabet and 
the printing press alone excepted, 
those inventions which abridge dis- 
tance have done most for civilization." 

The most important of these inven- 
tions are : railways, steamships, and 
telegraphs. The last named abridges 
distance to almost infinity, but con- 
cerns itself mostly with affairs of the 
former two. Of these two, railroads 
and steamships, the railroads seem to 
be the more important. Only oceans 
are a barrieV to them. Rivers have 
been bridgedV mountains and bays tun- 



neled, and the hardest rocks have been 
cut to make way for them. Steamships 
can gather their cargoes at a few ports 
only and deliver them at a seaport 
which is probably hundreds of miles 
away from the destination of the car- 
goes. Railways gather and distribute 
wherever they go and feed the seaports 
with exports. It is thus seen that rail- 
ways have been a factor of the greatest 
consequence in the development of sea- 
borne traffic. 

Although railroads are constructed 
and operated at a great expense, neces- 
sitating an enormous investment of 
capital, they are the greatest econo- 
mists of the age, for they tend to con- 
centrate industries to places where 
can be found the greatest natural ad- 
vantages, such as waterpower, favor- 
able climate, and supply of labor. Be- 
fore there were civilized peoples there 
was little diversity or specialization in 
industry. 

Each family or tribe supplied its 
own needs. When tribes began to bar- 
ter, 'they found that others had or 
made what they did not possess or 
produce, and thus there was a rude 
concentration of resources and handi- 
crafts in certain places. 

Railroads carry out this same prin- 
ciple, only more extensively. People 
in the New England states devote most 
of their time to manufacturing be- 
cause they have abundant water poWeir 
and poor soil for agriculture. Thte 
jpeople in the Mississippi basin ar'e 
"chiefly engaged in the raising of catt- 



;OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



tie and hogs liecause they have a 
good natural supply of feed. Pitts- 
])urgh is a great iron center since fuel 
and ir( n ore are close at hand. Each 
section therefore makes special efforts 
along the line to which it is naturally 
adapted. Special machinery is im-o- 
duced ai.d skilled labor developed so 
that a great cutput can be made at a 
minimum cost. To do away with this 
modern way of transportation would 
mean that we would have to g'o back 
and live as the people lived a hundred 
years ago. Every community would 
have to dissipate its energies along all 
the channe's in which the whole 
cmmtr}' is i^ractically directing its 
activities. 

The social and moral effect is more 
difficult to be estimated because the 
causes and results are more or less in- 
direct. 

By means of this modern conven- 
ience food supplies and other neces- 
sities are easily transported from one 
country to another. It affords man a 
varied diet, suitable clothing and other 
means 1)y which he can acclimate him- 
self to various conditions and is thus 
not weeded out so readily by natural 
selection when a change in location is 
made. 

Railway service is so efficient today 
that Chicago is closer to New York in 
time than Philadelphia was to New 
York one hundred years ago. This 
brings man in closer tiuch with more 
people. This makes competition keen- 
er and brings men of different geogra- 
.phical localitieSi ; with different tem- 
-peraments in cJosei? touch with each 
.-Other. This association of many itidi- 
.-viduals with diff,erent standards, cus- 
.|pms, and habits. t.ends to develop a 
world wide sympathy. As soon as the 



wants of a suffering ])eop]e are made 
known there is an immediate response 
to give relief. This was shiwn by the 
way people sent aid to Ohio during- the 
recent Hoods. The feelings are 
aroused and thus a common feeling for 
the human race, unknown before the 
days of modern commerce, is devel- 
oped. 

The reason why the North and the 
South could not arbitrate before the 
Civil War is because there were not 
sufficient means of communication to 
let each side know the exact condition 
of the other. The men from the North 
did not associate with the men from 
the South to acquire that sameness of 
mind which is essential to unity. 

Akin to the development of sym- 
pathy is unified public sentiment. The 
world sits in judgment over every 
morning paper, upon what men and 
nations do. This unity which arises 
crystallizes in international conferen- 
ces, such as the Hague tribunal and 
temporary courts of arbitration. Iso- 
lation has been called the .mother of 
barbarism, while communication and 
trade bring people together, aiid estab- 
lish better interest to promote the 
higher life of man. There will prob- 
ably be no Civil War again in the 
United States. "Twentieth Century 
Limited" and "overland limited" trains 
are closing the suture .between j, the 
East and the West, the North' and' the 
South. International wars vvill' be less 
frequent because a war betweeii two 
countries is a loss to all countries. No 
sooner is a rumor of war announced 
than the ticker on Wall Street shows 
a drop in the stocks of bur industrial 
corporations. The world' over,"'' rail- 
ways are harnessed in the interest o'f 
progress. ' •" • ' '' ''""'■'■ 



OU^ (^LLEGE TIMES 



To be,- sui;e,.. railways affect cisrtain 
localities adyersgly in .order, tp favor 
others, i ,Th^y have made and unmade 
toxyiis; they h^ve .caused flo^vers to 
blQQm and ti?, wither; they have stran- 
g.le,d pne au4 ;m9,de the other fat ; they 
have raised their wizard's wand and 
commanded puppets to do their bid- 
ding-; they have placed legislatures on 
wheels and hauled them whither they 
had constructed,, the track. 



But with it all railways have been 
and will continue to be one of the 
greatest agents of universal progress 
which the world has ever known. If 
we can but harness the railway as an 
institution as the railway engineer has 
harnessed the steam in his locomotive, 
human prigress will be accelerated and 
human welfare become more widely 
diffused. This harness is the law. 



The Renaissance 



E. G. Diehm. 



' The word Renaissance in its literal 
sense means a new birth. But by the 
word as it applies to the fiftieth and 
the first part of the sixteenth cen- 
tury is meint.a revival of learning in 
Italy. 'Or' in" a narrower sense it is 
that desire and zeal for literature, 
learning, and art which characterized 
life in western Europe. From another 
viewpoint the Renaissance w^as the 
coming back into the world of that 
independent, inquiring spirit which the 
m'en of Rome formerly possessed. 

Tiie Renaissance in Italy consisted 
of tWb phases; namely, the revival of 
classical literature and the revival of 
classical art. The former movement' 
is known as Humanism and the pro- 
moters as Humanists because of their 
interest in the study if letters con- 
certliiig ■huttiarilty.' It is this phase of 
literary astivity whidh we wish to dis- 
cuss briefly. ■ ' . • - ■' 



To this school of Humanism belong- 
ed three great men : Dante, Petrarch, 
and Boccaccio, who were known as 
the forerunners of the Renaissance. 
The nfluence exerted by them upon 
the Renaissance can not be overesti- 
mated. Of these three Humanists 
Petrarch was criticized and opposed, 
the first student who fully appreciated 
the beauty of the literature of 
mediaeval times. He collected about 
two hundred manuscript volumes of 
classical literature, including some of 
Cicero's letters. He had sixteen works 
of Plato and he himself wrote many 
letters to Homer, Cicero, and Virgil. 
Petrarch was critized and opposed. 
Nevertheless the movement was not 
checked. 

Boccaccio was a student of Petrarch 
and imitated ' hlhi -'iti studying Greek. 
His contribution . to the Renaissance 
was the manuscripts he copied. . I'n 



OUR COLLEGE ^li^tE^ ' 



this way he promoted ItaHan scholar- 
ship. Dante, although exiled, wrote 
his immortal poem entitled "Divina 
Commedia." In this work he views 
the world from the standpoint of the 
Middle Ages, yet it was the forerunner 
of the Renaissance. 

But coming to the immediate causes 
of bringing about the Renaissance in 
Italy, we find the foremost cause, the 
influence of the Italian cities. In 
these cities was nourished a political, 
intellectual, and artistic life like that of 
the cities of ancient Greece. Florence 
was the foremost and became a 
second Athens; and in the ambition of 
the city, individual talent was de- 
veloped as of old in Athens. 

Again, the break between the old 
and the new civilization in Italy was 
not so great. The Italians were close- 
ly related in language and in blood 
to the old Romans. But the other 
nations were only fragments of Rome 
and the gap between the old and the 
new civilization was much greater. 
Thus their development from an in- 
tellectual standpoint was greater. 

A third cause bringing about the 
Renaissance (not strictly in Italy, but 
nevertheless aiding the movement as 
started in Italy) was the development 
of science. Men were beginning to 
ask the reason fir all things. Ciper- 
nicus was thinking out the true move- 
ment of the solar system, and showing 
that the universe does not revolve 
around this world as a center. As a 
result of this activity colleges were 
established at both Cambridge ari4;Qx- 

.,; Moreover, jthe ^Jscpvery of the new 
wflvW figured greatly- , in this, 9.waken- 
^qg. ...This fii:ed^:thf J imaginations, ,-9,f 
men and made tlie most impossible 



dreams capable of realization. We 
can easily understand what influence 
this had upon the people when we 
consider the effect that the discovery 
of the little territory around the poles 
had upon the imaginations and de- 
sires of men of today. 

Furthermore, we find several caus- 
es aiding the Renaissance. Chief 
among these were the inven- 
tion if the printing press and the 
fall of Constantinople. About 1477 
William Caxton printed the first book 
in England. The most important 
book he printed was the "Canterbury 
Tales," thereby giving Chaucer's gen- 
ius and language wider influence. In 
the intellectual growth of a nation 
printing is ''an )important factor. It 
enables a language to become perma- 
nently fixed. 

The capture of Constantinople by 
the Turks was a factor in hastening 
the influence of Grecian literature in 
Western Christendom. Constantino- 
ple was the headquarters of Grecian 
learning, but when it fell many of her 
scholars went to Italy, taking with 
them Grecian manuscripts. As Eng- 
lishmen often visited Italy, they soon 
beg"an to study Grecian masterpieces 
and they fell under the spell of Homer 
and the Athenian dramatists. 

In almost every new movement we 
find both evil and good results ; and the 
results of the Renaissance were no ex- 
ception to this rule. The evil result 
of the Renaissance was the revival of 
paganism. , This was due to the study 
of the old pagan writers. With this 
new learning came alsQ the vices, qf 
low morals that marked. the. decline, of 
Roman. ;civili2atiQn, BiJjt; thp .ey-il -vffif 
surpassed by the good results, -.^Fjrs^t, 
the revival gave to Europe large stores 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



of valuable knowledge which the Avorld 
could not spare, and never would be 
willing to spare. It also greatly re- 
volutionized education by restoring to 
the world the pure classical Latin, and 



by rediscovering the Greek language, 
thus establishing in the universities, 
chairs in both the Greek and the Latin 
languages and literature. 



Sun Yat Sen— The Savior of China. 



A. Mack Falkenstein, 



The history of a nation is a history 
of its great men. Thus it has been 
from the very beginning of man's ex- 
istence, and thus it will continue until 
time is no more. For it is but natural 
that the masses be influenced and 
swayed by men born to lead ; men who 
in peace are wise and progressive ; in 
war brave and resourceful. To great 
men such as these is entrusted the mar- 
velous power to mould and fashion the 
destinies of nations. They, like bright 
beacons, shine here and there along 
the vistas of years and light up the 
checkered events of history. 

Such a man is Sun Yat Sen, the first 
provisional president of China. He is 
one of the greatest men of modern 
times. His connection with the revo- 
lution and the great reform movement 
in China, wherein he achieved great- 
ness, constitutes a long and interesting 
history. Volumes could be written on 
his life : his humble beginnings, his 
hard earned education, his conversion 
to Christianity, his travels and study, 
his sacrifices and the persecution of the 
Manchus, and his final triumph, every 
detail and episode emphasizing the no- 
bility of his character and the un- 
selfishness of his patriotism. 



Sun Yat Sen is quiet in manner and 
extremely moderate in speech; a man 
who is in all things thorough and prac- 
tical, rather than brilliant. He was ed- 
ucated with the hope that he would be- 
come a great physician. But his edu- 
cation was to serve a far grander pur- 
pose. It enabled him to realize the pit- 
iable condition of his countrymen, he 
heard the voice of a great people in op- 
pression, and he acted. He bent all 
his energies to reform, determined to 
transform the absolute monarchy of 
the Manchus to a constitutional mon- 
archy. But the irremediable impoten- 
cy and hopeless waywardness of the 
rule if the Manchus drove him ti des- 
peratiin and he became a revolutionist, 
determined to cleanse the Manchu cor- 
ruption with the baptism of fire and of 
blood. But realizing his lack of experi- 
ence and practical knowledge of gov- 
ernment, he departed for England, 
there to study her political and social 
institutions, continuing his studies in 
France. Only after his sojourn in 
Europe did he fully appreciate the 
grandeur of modern domestic theories 
and institutions in striking contrast 
with the tyrannical despotism of the 
sfovernment of his native land. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



On his return, he undertook the 
truly stupendous task of freeing- four 
hundred milhon people from oppres- 
sion and servile dependency, estab- 
lished by a direct line of kings longer 
than the dynasty of the Pharaohs, and 
enforced by a vast imperial army, and 
of forging from this material a great 
and lasting republic. Undaunted by 
its seeming impossibility, he gave him- 
self heart and soul to the cause. From 
the very beginning, it is a history of 
obstacles to be surmounted, failures to 
be endured, and defeats to be sus- 
tained. Xevertheless, e>;iled, and 
with a price of half a million dollars 
on his head, he perfects his plans. At 
last all is prepared ; from San Francis- 
co Dr. Sen gives the word ; the revo- 
lution spreads like wild fire ; the Man- 
chus are forced to abdicate ; the repub- 
lic is established ; and his efforts are 
crowned with success. 

The effects of the revolution are the 
direct result of Dr. Sun Yat Sen's lead- 
ership, and they are so wonderful and 
far reaching, that only time itself will 
reveal the full extent. But even now, 
after so short a time, the spirit of pro- 
gress and reform predominates every- 
where. Radical reform measures have 
been passed to suppress the opium 
trade and to elevate morality in gen- 
eral ; freedom of the press, and gran- 
der still, religious freedom has been 
established ; Christianity is coming to 



the front and promises to become a 
potent factor in the further develop- 
ment of China ; industry is advancing 
with gigantic strides ; schools and col- 
leges for women are being established 
and education in general is being- 
broadened and developed by the adop- 
tion of modern methods and standards. 
And China as a whole, alive to her re- 
sponsibility and her wonderful possi- 
bilities, is like a mighty giant, aw'ak- 
ened from a slumber of centuries. 

Since her recognition by the United 
States and the powers of Europe, 
China has taken her place in the gal- 
axy of great nations. Her future is 
glowing with bright promise. She 
has taken up the problem of self 
government on the grandest scale in 
all history. The blood of martyred 
missionaries was not shed in vain, for 
their fondest hopes are about to be re- 
alized. The masses are following the 
example of the educated class in ac- 
cepting Christianity, and China prom- 
ises in the not far distant future to be- 
come a Christian nation, willing to 
have the ship of state ruled by the om- 
nipotent hand of the God of the Na- 
tions. Then, when she shall have ful- 
filled her glorious promises and shall 
have attained the zenith of her glory, 
will she look back with reverence and 
with pride to Sun Yat Sen, leader of 
men, ruler of destinies, and savior of 
his country. 



?,' 






Possibilities of World Peace. 



A. L. Reber 



We are justified in assuming at once 
that a demand for universal peace is 
not by any means unreasonable. For, 
when a nation invests millions of dol- 
lars to qualify itself to spill the blood 
of its neighbors' best young men and 
that of its own young men, when de- 
struction and ruin are left in the path 
of invading armies, and when hearts 
are rent without cause, it is highly 
befitting that the engines of war 
should be abandoned and hurled to the 
lowest depths of oblivion, and that dis- 
putes between nations should be set- 
tled judiciously and at lowest cost. 

Peace as a universal end was ad- 
vocated by Christ nearly two thousand 
years ago. But then the human race 
had already spread over the habitable 
earth, portions had become isolated, 
all men had become fixed in their cus- 
toms and moulded by their past. Even 
to this day the doctrine of peace has 
not reached every man, and much less 
has its conquest been complete in 
those places which it has penetrated. 

War is as widespread as the nations 
and as old as the history of man itself, 
and in comparison with it the move- 
meiit' of peace seems to be of little in- 
terest and recent in origiin. When we 
behold the almost innumerable wars 
upon the records of history and those 
wars which we know not of, but 
which are certain to have been waged 
during the early development of the 
human race, and then think of the in- 
delible states of mind which their sac- 



rifices and gains, their devotions and 
fears, their sufiferings and glories have 
instilled upon the race, and then com- 
pare them with the futile efiforts of 
peace, we wonder what will become of 
the dove of peace. 

But why is it that men are filled 
with such a spirit of war? Ah! we 
can hear the low sound of the, answer 
coming from the haunts of our savage 
ancestors, we hear it in the twang of 
the bow, we hear it in the roar of tlie 
cannon, and in the roll of the drum. 
Is it any wonder, if for centuries and 
centuries men have fought and bled, 
that they possess an inborn love for 
the daring? Nor is this spirit at the 
present in any way quenched. The 
romantic nature of history taught in 
our schools awakens early in life that 
inborn fascination of the grapple. 
Again, more specifically, wars are often 
initiated by vain and ambitious rulers, 
who have only their personal interests 
at heart. We have numberless ex- 
amples of such rulers throughout the 
centuries. This thought is in most 
cases maintained to the present day, 
that wars are introduced by men in au- 
thority. However investigation shows 
that "it is often the people who are 
fired with a desire for war, while their 
governments, together with their sov- 
ereign, devoted to the preservation of 
peace, resist as long as they can the 
pressure of public opinion even at the 
risk of that popularity which they so 
eagerly seek." This statement is illus- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



trated in the late Italio-T|irkisli war. 
The Italian government had no decent 
pretext to open war with Turkey ; she 
did not wish to upset the political and 
economic ecjuilibrium of Europe, and 
the outcome of her enterprise was ex- 
ceedingly indefinite. Yet regardless 
of its own desire, the Italian govern- 
ment was forced to yield unwillingly 
to the pressure of public opinion. 

We are encouraged to know as we 
compare the centuries that actual wars 
are rapidly decreasing in number and 
that prosperity is advancing as never 
before. Compare the last fifty years 
with the latter half of the seventeenth 
century. Almost continual was existed 
during the former period, while only a 
few small wars existed in the latter. 
To what forces shall we attribute this 
advancement? Is it due to intellectual, 
moral, or material forces? It can be 
seen that it is liot due to single one 
of these alone but through their com- 
bined influence. Since democratic 
forms of government are causing the 
masses to think, will, and act for them- 
selves and since intellectual develop- 
ment is becoming more universal, the 
reason of man is beginning to tell him 
the folly of such a degenerating insti- 
tution as war. Since man is becoming 
enlightened by the revelation of God, 
he is respecting the divine d )ctrine of 
peace. But the greatest forces assist- 
ing are material forces. Were there 
no development along this line, the na- 
tions could and would not know each 
other or communicate with each other. 
Material forces,' such as railroads, 



can^lSj steamships, and telegraph sys- 
tems are making the world smaller and 
bringing the remotest lands together, 
teaching them the blessings of love 
and respect. It is through these means 
that dififerences are removed, that na- 
tional and racial prejudices are being 
obliterated. 

But friends, allow me to say, that 
the fact of the matter is, that man is 
not really desiring peace. True it is, 
however, that man feels the wasting in- 
fluence of war, that he respects divine 
commands, and that he loves and re- 
gards the rights of his fellowmen ; 
truly he is moving from those ancient 
barbarities, destitutes of all reason and 
mercy ; nevertheless, he possesses that 
peculiar inborn, God-given self-asser- 
tive tendency, which cannot be over- 
come without great difficulty and 
length of time. This quality seems to 
be as much a part of man as his hands 
and feet, and if in time it is removed 
he will become both a coward and a 
sluggard. If we stifle this inborn im- 
pulse in our overanxiety for peace, this 
state will bring forth athrorig of en- 
feebled and spiritless nations. Man 
has always striven and will continue 
to strive toward the highest and the 
best that is attainable. It is only 
through the influence of this compo- 
nent that man will continue to aim at 
perfection. But in this, struggle for 
perfection will there not be sorrows 
and joys, labors and blessings, fellow- 
ships and jealousies, both peace and 
war? . ' i 









The Witch Agency in Macbeth 



B. F. Waltz. 



Many people have the idea that 
Macbeth was entirely a victim of fate. 
Such, however, is not the case. None 
of Shakespeare's characters are thus 
portrayed. In all his plays he gives 
all his characters the power of choice. 
Fate is no man's determining force, 
naturally speaking, and Shakespeare 
would not make so great a mistake as 
to have any of his characters over- 
ruled by the decrees of the Saxon 
Wyrd. 

The power of the weird sisters is 
not absolute but relative. Where 
there is no evil they do not have any 
power. This is proved very strongly 
in the third scene of the first act. All 
the witches hail Macbeth as thane of 
Cawdor. They do more than that : 
"All hail, Macbeth, thou shalt be King 
hereafter!" They proclaim him lesser 
than Macbeth, and greater : 
"Thou shalt get kings, though tliou be 

none; 
So all hail, Macbeth and Banquol 
Banquo and Macbeth, all hail !" 

The kingship is the very thing he 
has been thinking about. That is the 
reason for the occasion of Banquo's 
question : "Good sir, why do you 
start, and seem to fear things that do 
sound so fair?" The suggestion to 
Macbeth that others may know of his 
evil intentions troubles him. When- 
ever a person is on a tension, having 
done or thought an evil deed, he is 
likely to be confounded when confront- 
ed with the same thing by somebody 



else. . The "thou shalt be king hereaf- 
ter" encouraged him very much. Mac- 
beth still has the power of choice. He 
has not yet done any evil. He still 
has a chance to do the right thing. 
He proves that he has a great desire 
to hear the sisters when he says : 

"Stay you imperfect speakers, tell 
me more." 

It agrees so very well with what he 
had thought that he cannot see them 
going. His "Would they had stayed" 
shows how they appeal to him. Evil 
associates with evil. It is not difficult 
for a person to receive sanction of evil 
if one goes to evil doers. 
"Oftimes to win us to our harm, 
The instruments of darkness tell us 

truths, 
Win us with honest trifles, to betray 's 
In deepest consequence." 

Hecate says later in the fifth scene 
of the third Act, 
"He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and 

bear 
His hopes, 'bove wisdom, grace, and 

fear; 
And, you all know, security 
Is mortal's chiefest enemy." 

She simply harps on what is already 
in Macbeth's mind. She, as well as 
others, presents nothing new. In 
other words they originate nothing. 
Macbeth is no longer his own deter- 
miner of destiny. He says, "Which 
must be acted ere they may be 
scann'd." He is in the firm grip of 
fate. No longer is he a free moral 
agent. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



IS 



The loathsome ingredients of the 
hell-broth, which the weird sisters brew 
in Act four scene one, work as a magic 
charm on him. The first two appara- 
tions which appear, act as "artificial 
sprites which draw him on to his con- 
fusion." They strengthen the witches 
testimony. WHien the third one comes 
his confidence in them is clinched. 
Their work is finished. He has gone 
down the scale farther and fai"ther. 



and no longer is there any hope for. 
him. 

In considering the agency of the 
weird sisters the witches simply harp 
on what he desired or premeditated. 
The evil in Macbeth responded to the 
evil as suggested by the witches. If 
we associate with the good, and think 
only of that, the evil, although suggest- 
ed, will have no power over us. 



Shannon Lectures 

Professor T. W. Shannon who rep- 
lesents the World's Federation 'of 
Purity visited this place on April first 
and second and delivered a number 
of lectures to the ladies and gentle- 
men separately and also to mixed 
audiences, on the subjects of Heredity, 
Environment, Sex Hygiene and 
Morality, Physical, Mental and Moral 
Preparation for Parenthood, Court- 
ship, Marriage, Divorce and msny more 
similar subjects. He is a man with a 
strong personality and a kind heart 
and was heard at this place by intense- 
ly interested audiences. His lec- 
tures and private talks have been of 
great help to many at school and we 
wish him rich success in the fight that 
he is helping to wage with an ever 
increasing number of other good men 
and women against the evil and de- 
gradation of this world. 

It was through the efiforts of Prof. 
Shannon that a \\'hite Cross League 
was organized amono- the irentlemen 



ha\'ing over sixty members. It is be- 
ginning its work under the leader- 
ship of President W. K. Kulp, and 
Secretary J. D. Reber. The White 
Cross Pledge is one that should be 
lived out by every Christian. 

I promise by the help of 

God : 

1. To treat all women with respect, 
and endeavor to protect them from 
wrong and degradation. 

2. To endeavor to put down all in- 
decent language and coarse jests. 

3. To maintain the law of purity as 
equally binding upon men and women. 

4. To endeavor to spread these prin- 
ciples among my companions and to 
try and help my younger brothers. 

5. To use every possible means to 
fulfil the command, "Keep thyself 
pure." 

There has also been organized a 
White Shield League among the ladies, 
which has over fifty members. 



;'^iJti-l F 




EDITORIAL BOARD. 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, '11, Editor-in-Chief 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 



Obville Z. Beckek, '15 iSchool Notes 

Nora L. Reber, '11 Homerian JNews 

Mary Scheaffek, '13: K. L. S. News 

Leah Sheaffer, '09 Alumni Notes 



C. L. Martin, '13 Exchanges 

J. D. Reber, '14 Bus. Mer. 

A. L. Reber, '13 Asst. Bus Mgr. 

Daisy P. Rider, '10 Art Editor 



Our College Times is published moathlv durini? the Academic year by Elizabethtovvn Codege. 

Arrearage on subscription to this paper is charged. 

Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates: — Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy; five years for $2.00. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabetbtown Postotfice. 



The Undiscovered Gold Mine. 

A little over a half century ago the 
valleys of i the Pacific coast were 
sparsely populated and the gold mines 
of California unknown to the pioneer. 
But with the discovery of gold in this 
far western state in 1848, the eyes of 
entire North America were directed 
toward this western Eldorado ; thous- 
ands of people caught the mining fever 
and pressed with great speed toward 
,this land of treasure, many of whom 
died while. crossing the American des- 
/jart 9,nd left, their skeletons as guide- 
■ posts to those who followed them in 



their wake. Thus at the cost of many 
stalwart lives the extreme west was 
quickly settled and the rich gold mines 
discovered one by one. 

Among those whom the mining fev- 
er captivated was a young man who 
at the age of twenty-six had gone to 
Nevada as a private secretary to his 
brother. He intended to stay only sev- 
eral months but he spent seven lo.ng 
years in this western, country. A§,he 
did not happen to strike much pay- 
dirt in his mining career, he entered 
upon the work of, a,_^ripwpsaper report- 
er and finally became :a' distinguished 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 







editor. Thus did Mark Twain dis- 
cover the gold mine of his genius as a 
writer and in a few years produce the 
inimitable volumes called "Roughing 
It," and "The Adventures of Tom 
Sawyer." 

The life of Sir Walter Scott tells a 
similar tale. He had made himself 
famous in verse by his stories of tKe 
old feuds between the Highlander and 
the Lowlander, and between the 
Scotch and the English lords of the 
borders ; but he began to realize that 
his genius as a writer lay in writing 
prose tales which no living auth'r could 
excel. He also realized that he was be- 
ing surpassed in the realm of poetry 
by Byron and partly for this reason 
turned the full power of his genius on 
historical fiction and brought forth 
from his mine of wealth a treasure not 
as yet discovered — the novel Waverley. 
The world recognized the worth of the 
work and hailed him as a genius. 

From the' lives of these' two men it 
IS evident that they were both guided 
in their early career by the rushlight 
•of fancy while the sun of genius was 
■obscured by the night of inexperience. 
These men, in order to become immor- 
tal, had to liberate themselves from 
the shackles of ignorance and fancy ; 
an awakening to their real mission in 
life was necessary ; their gold mines of 
genius had to be discovered and ex- 
ploited. 

We may hear of the success of good 
and noble men ; we may eagerly aspire 
to the deeds of philanthropists, writers, 
and reformers; but unless we discover 
the golden mine of our genius, we can- 
not live life at its best. We may be en- 
gaged in some work that is noble, yet 
we might be doing something nobler; 
we perhaps have discovered the copper 



mine of fancy. We may be doing a 
work that is holy, yet we might be do- 
ing something holier; we perhaps have 
discovered the silver mine of talent. 
We may be pursuing the design of our 
creation ; if so, we have, discovered the 
gold mine of genius. ... It is of the ut- 
most importance that we discover this 
gold mine ; and it should be the pur- 
pose of every college and university in 
the land to assist young men and 
young women in this great quest. For 
a life lived with an unej^ploited mine 
of genius is a life whose wealth has 
failed to enrich some one of God's 
needy children. The question now 
comes : How may we discover the gold 
mine of our genius ? 

In the first place, we wish to state 
that very few have made this discovery 
without first getting the mining fever. 
To discover in which direction mir 
genius lies requires that each indivi- 
dual shoulder a pick and a shovel, for 
it will require some digging and rnuch 
"dirt" may have to be shoveled before 
any pay-dirt is discovered. - A noted 
inventor gives the composition of gen- 
ius as follows : 90 per cent, perspira- 
tion ; 10 per cent, inspiration. The 
sooner the average American college 
student learns this formula, the sooner 
will he discover the gold mine of his 
genius. Very little gold has ever been 
discovered without a search for it. So, 
father, if your son has a desire to ex- 
periment on your farm, in' your office, 
or in your store, let him follow what 
may seem to you the rushlight of fartcy 
for it may prove to be the rising sun 
of his genius. — the dim light of his ac- 
complishments may be the reflection 
of the gold mine upon his deeds. Tf 
he has a desire to go to college, give 
him a chance to use the pick of thought 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and discipline so as to enable him to 
discover the mine of his genius. The 
discipline of a college education has 
assisted many young men and women 
to turn from the mines of copper and 
silver to those of gold ; to turn from 
a life of fame to a life of service. So 
whether we are to discover through 
our experiences on the farm or in 
school, in what direction our genius 
lies, it must be remembered that such 
a discovery wall hardly be made with- 
out diligent application to the task. 
We must get the mining fever, and 
start at once for the mine. 

There are many who get the mining 
fever but do very little digging. These, 
of course, discover very little gold. 
Every college has those students who 
saunter through her halls and enter 
her class-rooms, with pick and shovel, 
in hand but rarely use them, — some 
even seem to have lost all their tools. 
They lack the inspiration of work; 
they lack true college spirit. Some 
students are deluded in the hope of dis- 
covering their line of genius by the 
use of the baseball bat and the foot- 
ball. Athletic tools will pass toclear 
the surface soil but will never pierce 
the strata of rock lying upon the rich 
vein of gold. When athletics occupy 
too much of the students' time the au- 
thorities of such an institution ought 
to use discretion and give those stu- 
dents the proper tools. Then, there are 
those who ride through the realms of 



Cicero, Virgil, Livy, Plautus, Demos- 
thenes, Plato, and Sophocles, and evert 
through the wide domains of Lessing, 
Goethe, and Moliere on a "Linear"' 
broncho or on a *'Handy" pony. Of 
course these worthies are dead and 
gone, and hence say nothing; but the 
time will come when your bronch and 
your pony will die and you will have 
to foot the hill alone; then woe to him 
who never learned to plod- There will 
be the rub ; Pedes will triumph over 
Eques. Gold mines are discovered not 
by riding about in state, but by digging- 
into the earth. 

It is ])erhaps thought that not every 
one is endowed with genius, and that 
consequently, there is no gold mine of 
genius to be discovered by every one. 
This is a mistake, for each individual 
is created with a purpose in view and 
is endowed with certain qualities es- 
pecially adapted for the realization of 
that purpose. As soon as man finds 
what that purpose is and wills to use 
his talent in that direction, God's will 
will be done in earth as it is in heaven. 
Nothing will assist so well in the dis- 
covery of the gold mine of genius as a 
college education and good common 
sense. If we desire to uplift society; 
if we wish our names to be remem- 
bered by posterity ; if we hope to meet 
the approbation of our Creator at the 
end of the world, we must rouse our- 
selves from our letharg}', discover and 
exploit the gold mine of genius. 




s 



c 


















t 



L 



S 



And what is so rare as a day in June? 

Then, if ever, come perfect days; 
Then hea^•en tries earth if it be in tune, 

And over it softly her warm ear lays. 

• — Lowell 

It is the month of June, 

The month of leaves and roses, 

When pleasant sights salute the eyes 
And pleasant scents the noses. 

— N. P. Willis. 

June has come to College Hill bring- 
ing with it all the pleasantries and ex- 
citement of Commencement Week. 
Everybody is heartily invited to attend 
our different public programs during 
Commencement Week beginning on 
the evening of June the eighth and 
ending on Thursday noon June the 
twelfth. The Commencement Week 
Calendar follows : 

Sunday. June 8, Baccalaureate Ser- 
mon, at 7.30 p. m., by I. W. Taylor, 
Lititz, Pa. 

Monday, June 9, Music Program at 
8.00 p. m., by Music Department, in 
Music Hall. 



Tuesday, June 10, Graduating Exer- 
cises, Commercial Department, at 8.00 
p. m., aadress by Dr. W. E. Dengler, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wednesday, June 11, Class Day 
Program, at 2.00 p. m. Alumni Meet- 
ing at 8.00 p. m. 

Thursday, June 12, Connnencement 
Exercises, at 9.00 a. f. Election of 
Trustees at 1.30 p. m. 

The graduating" class of Elizabeth- 
town College in the year nineteen hun- 
dred and thirteen is as follows : 

Pedagogical Course 
Rebekah Sheaffer, Irene Sheetz, Nora 
Reber, C. L. Martin. 

College Preparatory Course 
A. L. Reber, C. J. Rose, E. G. Diehm, 
I. R. Herr, H. D. Root, Alexander 
Mack Falkenstein. 

English Scientific Course 
Rhoda Miller 
English Bible Course 
Sara Moyer, Mary Schaeffer 

Music Teachers' Course 
Delia Shank, Carrie Dennis. 
Commercial Course 
Ruth Landis, Lydia Miller, J. Z. Hack- 



m 



0\m 3€OLIJEGE TiMESJ « 



man, Hiram Eberly, H. B. Brumbaugh, 
E. G. Long. 

There are also a number of gradu- 
ates in the sewing course this year. 

Mr. Leiter made an announcement 
in the dining hall on the evening of 
April the eleventh calling a meeting 
of some ushefs after which Miss Myer 
supplemented his announcement by ad- 
ding that the ushers were not appoint- 
ed for a wedding ceremony but for the 
Anniversary exercises. A great dis- 
appointment- 
Baseball is still claiming much in- 
terest. The series between the Kulp- 
ites and the Herrites resulter in a vic- 
tory for the Kulpites by a score of 
three games to one. Another series 
has been finished which was played 
between the Lancaster Countv Cham- 
pions and the All Stars and which has 
resulted in a great victory for Grand 
Old Lancaster County. The scores of 
the dififerent games are : 



Lan. Co. Champs 


All Stars 


First Game ly 


13 


Second game 7 


6 


Third game . 3 


4 


Fourth game 11 


5 



All Stars. Lane Co. Champs. 

Alerkey, ib. A. L. Reber ib. 

Shelley, s.s. H. F. Shank, s.s. 

Rose, 2b. Herr, 2b. 

Burgess, p. Kulp, p. 

Lineaweaver, c. Geyer, c. 

Shenk, H. P. cf. Hershey. cf. 

Edris, If. Engle, If. 

Kinzel, 3b. Brandt, 3b. 

Kreider, rf, Diehm rf. 

*Swope *Substitutes. 

!;\^eiiger, K. . , , 

Last term there was a "Deutscher 
Tisch" in the':! dining room, der, aus 



Studenten bestand die Deutsch studier- 
ten. Before the tables were changed 
at the beginning of the term theise 
"Deutsche" had a feast which was 
very unlike the usual set-out. The 
menu consisted of the following: 
Hueshner suppe, Wasserkress, Pfeffer- 
gurke,W:eissbrot, einundzwanzig quart 
Wurzelbier, Roggenbrot, Kartoffein, 
Sauerkraut, Wurst, Thee, Bretzeln, 
Huehnerbraten, Eier, Gemischte Sues- 
zen Pfefifergurke, Oxhoftkaese, Blut- 
wurst, Schweizerkaese, Kartoiifel- 
shnitzel, Kesselkaese, Zwieveln, Leber- 
wurst, Kuddelflecke, H'aeuschenkaese,. 
Frankfurter, Oelbeere, Kartofifelnsalat^ 
A e p f e 1 , Zuckerdicksaft, Runde 
Schmalzkuchen, Pfefiferkuchen, Scho- 
koldekuchen. Milch, Knoblauchbolo- 
gnawurst, t'elamiwurst, Cereblate- 
wurst, und so weiter, etc. 

Miss Springer: "Mr. R. would you 
do a favor for me?" 

Mr. R.: "Certainly." 

Miss Springer: "Well, please don't 
stare at me so much in class. It is 
very embarrassing." 

On the evening of Arbor Day, April 
the eleventh, there was held in the Col- 
lege Chapel the Twelfth Anniversary 
of the Keystone Literary Society and 
the Second joint Anniversary of the 
Homerian Literary Society. The offi- 
cers of the occasion were : President, 
W. E. Glasmire, '07, Palmyra, Pa. ; 
Vice President, Daniel V. Shank, 
Shrewsbury, Pa. ; Secretary, Miss 
Mamie Keller, '12, York, Pa.; Choris- 
ter, Miss Kathryn Miller, Green Cas- 
tle, Pa. The followiii,g program was 
rendered : , ,^., . , - . ,. 

Invocation — Frank Carper, Palmyra. 
Ladies' Quartet. 

President's Address— W:'E. Glasmire. 
^vrPalmyra, Pa. :',''x;.: :;n; ^:. ..'jm-:'..*; 



OUR :CQLLEGE jriHESj 



21^; 



Recitation — George Washington, Ger- 
trude Newcomer, '08, Waynesboro. 
Paper — "Domestic Science," Mary 

Hertzler, '05, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Girls' Chorus — Welcome Pretty Prim- 
rose. 
Address— The Wonderful Land, Rev. 

Frank Croman, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Male Quartet. 

Benediction — Rev. Frank Croman. 
Student : "What is love?" 
Miss Lydia Miller: "Love is an in- 
side and an outside all overness," 

Subscribe for Our College Times be- 
fore you leave school. 

We wish to criticise the incorrect 
grammar of one of our lady students 
from Dixieland when she says: "I are 
her (Herr.)" 

The Bible Department of the school 
gave its social on the night of March 
the twenty-second in honor of the one 
hundreth anniversary of the birth of 
David Livingstone the great African 
missionary. Mr. Waltz gave. an illus- 
trated lecture on this occasion. 

Teacher in American History :"W'hat 
is free coinage?" 

Student : "Free coinage is when any 
one can bring his bunions to be 
coined." 

On the evening of April the twenty- 
fourth Dr. D. W. Kurtz, pastor of the 
First Church of the Brethren in Phila- 
delphia, gave the last lecture of the 
regular Star Course on the subject, 
"The Meaning of Culture." We real- 
ize this lecture to have been a true 
exposition of what true culture is and 
it's value. A large audience listened 
to this lecture and appreciated it very 
much. 

. 1 A, committee of three has been jip^ 
pointed by the Eastern District oi the 



Church of the Brethren to consider the 
advisability of placing Ejizabethtown 
College under the auspices of the 
Church of the Brethren. 

Three of our teachers, Misses Stauf- 
fer and Myer, and Professor H. K. 
Ober are attending the Annual Confer- 
ence of the Church of the Brethren 
which meets this year at Winona Lake, 
Indiana. Miss Stauffer who has 
charge of the Bible Department has 
finished all of her work here and will 
not return before the next school year. 



K. L. S. Notes. 

The Keystone Society met in regular 
Literary session on May 9. The newly 
elected officers were inaugurated. The 
president then gave an address on 
Self-reliance. 

The following Lyric program was 
then rendered : 
Solo— "O My Luve's Like a Red. Red 

Rose,"— Ruth Coble. 
Recitations — "To a Mountain Daisy',, 

"Ode to the West Wind,"— Percy 

Shelley. 
Recitations — "The Last Leaf." ■ "A 

Man's a Man for a' That"— Lillian 

Becker. 
Recitations — "To a Skylark," "Evelyn 

Hope," — Mary Hershey. 
Song— "To Celia"— Male Quartet. 
Recitations — "The Old Familiar 

Faces," "Intimations of Immortality' 

Helen Oellig. 
Recitation — "Elegy Written in a Coun- 
try Churchyard," — Edna Wenger 
Recitations—" The Courtin'," The 

Chambered Nautilus," — Edna Bru- 

baker. 
Solo— "Auld Lang Syfte,"— Harr/ 

F. Sharik. ■•'• ' ' ■ ■ ''- 

Literary-' Echo- Harry • Mjoyer. : ' . - : 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



On May 2t, the Society met in exe- 
cutive session. One new member was 
elected. The following program was 
then rendered : 

Music — "x^uld Lang Syne," — Society 
Declamation — Mr. Elam Zug. 
Reading — "The Conjugation Dutch- 
man" — Esther Sauder. 
Impromptu Debate — "Resolved, 

That the President of the United 
States should be elected by the direct 
vote of the people." 

Debated affirmatively by C. J. 
Rose; Negatively by E. G. Diehm. 
The judges decided in favor of the 
Negative. 

Solo — "Roses" — Bertha Perry. 
Recitation — "Mona's Waters" — Iva 

Spangler. 
Literary Echo — Harry Moyer. 

The program on May i6 was post- 
poned on account of a lecture by Dr. 
Ellis. 



HOMERIAN NEWS. 

The number of our members is still 
increasing. At one of our recent pri- 
vate sessions we were pleased to elect 
Wm. K. Kiilp an active member. Miss 



Elizabeth Myer lately favored the 
society with an address on Pronun- 
ciation. The discussion proved to be 
interesting as well as instructive. At 
our last private meeting the following 
officers were declared elected by the 
secretary: Speaker, H. H. Nye; Vice 
President, W. K. Kulp ; Monitor, Ger- 
trude Miller; Chaplain, Lydia StaufiEer; 
Secretary, I. J. Kreider; Critic, J. G. 
Myer. 

On the evening of May 30, a public 
program was rendered. 
Prayer — Chaplain. 
Music — Ladies' Quartet. 
Recitation— Tim's Vacation — Agnes 

Ryan. 
The Witch Agency in Macbeth— B. 

F. Waltz. 
Railroads a Factor in Civilization — J. 

D. Reber. 
Vocal Solo — Katherine Miller. 
Reading— Arena Scene from Quo 

Vadis— Gertrude Miller. 
The Educational Value of Latin and 

Greek— L. W. Leiter. 
Interpretations of Musical Selections, 

Leah M. Sheafifer. 
Critic's Report — J. G. Myer. 




Cofmencement is coming ! Alumni, 
you should be thinking of E'town 
now! You should be planning to at- 
tend the exercises of Commencement 
week ! You should at least arrange 
to be present on Alumni day, Wednes- 
day, June II. Do not let your seat be 
vacant at the supper! Be on hand for 
the evening program, and especially 
for the business session. 

The invitations to the luncheon 
have been issued and every member 
should have one. If you did not re- 
ceive any come at any rate, as it was 
an oversight. Address a card to Irene 
Wise of Elizabethtown and she will 
forward you an invitation. 

Miss Kathryn Moyer will recite at 
the Alumni program and the chief ad- 
dress of the evening will be delivered 
by Amos P. Geib, now of Brooklyn, 
New York. The program bids fair to 
be a very interesting one. Be sure 
to be here ! 

Prof. R. W. Schlosser had charge of 
the services in the Spring Creek con- 
gregation on Sunday, June i. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Byer who were 
at the Bethany Bible School during the 
past year are now in Sterling, Illinois 
where Mr. Byer has charge of the 
Church of the Brethren. 

C. L. Martin, '12, sang at an Anni- 
versary program at Millersville on 
May 2. 

F. L. Olweiler paid the school a 
visit and attended the public meeting 
of the Homerian Literary Society. 



A letter from Henry J. Sheaffer, now 
working in Butte, Montana reads in 
part as follows : 

'T have not forgotten the good I re- 
ceived while attending E'town College 
and when I see my way clear I will be 
back to take the opportunity of com- 
pleting your three years' business 
course. I will give you all the sup- 
port I can to make the school a suc- 
cess." 

?klr. Sheaffer also subscribed for 
"Our College Times," Can you say as 
much? 

John Miller and James Breitigan 
were oresent at the lecture given by 
Dr. Ellis. We are glad to see them 
with us frequently. 

Carrie B. Hess was also one of the 
Alumni who enjoyed this lecture. 

\\\ F. Christman was a visitor at 
the College a few weeks ago. The 
grand old town and College Hill have 
pleasant spots for him. 

]\Irs. Frank W. Groff paid a week's 
visit to her parents in Bedford County. 
She reports that she had a pleasant 
trip. 

L. D. Rose who taught in Somerset 
County last year, expects to be at the 
Commencement exercises. 

W. K. Kulp attended the Ephrata 
lovefeast on May 24. 

L. ^^^ Leiter took a trip across the 
river several weeks ago. 

Prof. I. G. Alever intends to spend 
a part of his vacation in summer school 
Columbia University. 




In many cases the standard to which 
a paper rises, depends directly on the 
Editor-in-chief. In the first place the 
Editor-in-chief usually appoints all the 
associate editors. In this his selection 
bears a direct influence on the paper. 
Should he choose some one who is 
simply a good friend, the chances are 
that the fact of mere friendship be- 
tween editors will not produce a good 
paper. Mere friendship is not sufficient; 
cient, appointee must have the ability 
to meet the requirements to produce 
his share of a good paper. Right here 
the appointee must have the ability 
judging of the Editor-in-chief, — ^^the 
power to gather around him the best 
ability in the school. 

Secondly, every article in the paper 
passes imder the judgment of the 
Editor-in-chief. WJiat he allows to 
pass depends on his good or bad judg- 
ment, and characterizes his judgment. 
If he has the power to sift the best 
from the articles presented his paper 
Hvi'U, b© of tliat. type. Hence, when 
you juage a^-p^pjer, . ypu . judge the 
Editor-in-chi'ef"'tg a larg-e extent. 

• X^r.Svft'JWr:' I^'wumjaex. c^-.T^euC«irlisle 
Arrow is quite an improvement over 



the other issues. Its cover is, neat. 
The photographs make it interesting, 
We especially like the article on "In- 
teresting Features of Lancaster 
County." William Garlow's article, 
"Possibilities of spare Moments," ought 
to be read three times a day by some 
students. 

The Palmerian is the best looking 
paper on our list this month. It gives 
us a fair literary department The 
editorials are, however, rather con- 
ventional. 

The exchange editor of the Muhlen- 
berg surely spends some time being 
about his business. Read the ex- 
clrange articles. 

Read, "Is the Cost of Living Really 
Increasing?" in the Susquehanna. 
Seemingly the Editor-in-chief of this 
paper has pretty sound judgment. 
The Susquehanna may be classed 
among the "Reliable." 

"Loyal Alumni" in The Albright 
Bulletin sets forth aii excellent truth. 
The success of a school .depends large^ 
ly on its alumni. Loyalty has almost 
classed itself a,ra.of>g- tl:^ Cja,rdinal vir- 
tues. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



If you wish to produce a good paper, 
pattern after the neatness of the 
Palmerian, the depth of the Albright 
Bulletin and the balance of the Sus- 
quehanna. 

When so many of the editorials try 
to tell us that "spring has come" 
"another eight months have gone past," 
"only three months of school are left," 



"we find that we are again at the 
close of another school year" and "with 
the first-days of spring," we realize 
that some editors need to wake up and 
learn that this is 1913. That old con- 
ventional way of saying th,ings . is 
soon ready to be placed in .some hi4 
torical museum. Editors please give 
us something to think about. 



Fresh and Smoked Meats 

S. M. RENSEL 

S. Market St. 0pp. Exchange Bank 

Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. None 
Better, Fe-w^ as Good. 

D. H. BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN 



The baker who knows how. Phone or drop a postal 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



CENTRAL 



MEAT 



MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



H. H. GOOD 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



UP TO DATE 



^having and Hair Cutting 



The Pratt 
Teachers' Agency 



70 Fifth AveKne 
Ne-wr York 



r: h: shissler. 



Receives calls at all seasons for college 
and normal grsduates, specialists and 
other teachers in colleges, public and 
private schools in all parts of the coun- 
trv. 

Advises parents about schools. 

WM. O. PRATT, Manager 



Plain Suits, Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats. 

GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange Sts., Lancaster, Pa. 

Elizabethtown Dental . 
Parlors r f. 

Office Closed Thursday 
and Friday 

S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 

Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. : 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded f 



26 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



IliSli 
1 



l!igi;ii:S3^'.iaillllSlllliaiili;BIIIIIBIIIllHIIII!Biill:Hi!!l!a'''iB>lil 
College Jewelry cf the Better Sorl 

G. Wm. REISNER 

Manufacturing 
Jc^^cier 

Class Pins and Rings 
Fraternity Je-wrelry 

120 East Chestnut Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 

lll!0llll!^lllil^llli!S;!l!:!S:!!i''2!ii:!^>ilI!OI>l^!!i:!^!lll!^l 



Prize Caps 
Medals 






LEO KOB 

Heating and 



ELIZA BETHTOWN, PA. 



{.4.^4.4.4.4.4.^4.4.^4ti{i4.4.4.i{i4i4>4>4>4<4><|>4>4>4>4*'i> 



I 



F. T. Muth H. M. Muth 

MUTH BROS 

Dealers in 

LUMBERo 

Also all kinds of building material 
and mill work, Slate and Cement, 
Wheeler Screens, Fertilizer, Patent 
Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board, etc. 

COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. 

We also aim to give you a square 
deal that will merit jour trade and 
friendship. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

> I M 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 * ♦ n 1 1 1 1 11 11 1 



DENTIST 

GEO. K. KERSEY 

Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



WE DO IT RIGHT. 



Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES CSi SON 

F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 

Horseshoeing a Specialty. 

X. Alarket Street, Elizabethtown. 



J. CROFF & sons 

eat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



This Pen 
Upside Down 



— if you want to. Ye5, in any posi- 
tion, any pocket. 

Boys: carry the Parker Jack Knife 
Pen in your trousers pocket along 
with your keys. 

Girls: carry it in the pocket of 
y^ur while blouse. 

Play football with it, — basketball, 
tennis, hockey, it's on the job the 
minute you want to write, without 
leaving a pinhead spot of ink any- 
where it has been carried. 

Write? Just im.gine a pen of 
cliss that melts to ink as you slide it 
across paperl TTiat's the way it writes. 

Price $2. 50 up. Get one on trial. 
Take it back any time within 10 
days if you're not tickled to death 
with it. We authorize dealer to re- 
fund. If your dealer doesn't carry 
Parkers, write us for catalog today. 

PARKER PEN COMPANY 
MiU St.. Janesville, Wu. 

PARKER 

Jade Knife Safety 

FOUNTAIN PEN 





For sale at the Bookroom. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



27 



1900 



191: 



IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 

SEVEN REASONS : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Equipment. 

For further particulars, address 

Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN PA. 






jjiftg 1ST iii,it:;\'i; -.:..■■• .^>3•«i^'^•.ip.^>4.•;^o>3>vt•^•f^-^><S»^•|s^4?^^ 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-Made Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 

North East Corner Centre Square, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



JACOB FISHER 
Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 

VVilh vou for 31 years. That's All 



E H. LEHMAN 
COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN FEED , FLOUR. \ 
Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

Bell an.l Ind. PhoneS 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 

46 E. King St., Lancaster, Pa. 

CHOICE MEATS 

A. K. Ydung 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



W. R. Ashenfelter | 



CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

\V eddings and artiea supplied with 
Fancy Cakes at short notice. 

%;llllAWfT ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
will convince. Work guaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown. Pa. 



Ind. Phone 



Hours 8 to 6 



DR. JEROME G. HESS 
DENTIST 



Hertzler Bldg. 
Elizabethtown Pa. 




Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 

Choice Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees, Fresh Country Butter and £ggs 

Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Penna 

We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and IVIonograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 

Y. M. C. A. Bldg., Lancaster, Pa. 



►^^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4 



! H. H. BRAND! t 

♦ J 

i Dealer in ^ 



ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



I 



Elizabethtown, 



- Penna. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing.' 



^ 



THE ''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
Shipped every Wednesday 



tLlZ. ir>:^Tii TG ".V X, 



I'ExNXA. 



^ 



-.J 



Sporting Goods 



Post Cards 



Agent for all periodicals. 

Pocket cutlery, toys, novelties, etc. 

Fine confections. 

H. K. Dorsheimer 

Bell 'Phone 38-3 
On the Square, Elizabethtown. Pa. 



School Supplies 



Stationery 



John A. Fisher 

BARBER 



Centre Square, 



£lizabethto\irn., Pa 



i 



JOS. H. RIDER & SON 



AGENCY FOR 



L^l 



SPALDING'S 

Baseball i Tennis Goods 



^ t » » » » » ^»^ » »» ^ ^» ^ ^ ^ »^ » *^^****^ 




. B KLII^SE 



CHOICE GROCEiRIES " 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



GEO. A. FISHER 

HARDWARE 

Automobiles 
Pttonoyraphs and 
Records 
F. P. GAS PLANTS 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA,. 




ROLLER MlLLSj: 



♦ '. J. F. biNKLEY, Propr. 

♦ Manufacturer of Beet Grades of , ,> J ► 

J ; TLOtJR" and,fee» j""" ' '"■ 

4 Highest Cash Prices paid for grain, 

♦ hay and straw 

t BiilZATBETHTOWN, --^i^te^f^A' 



30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of your Patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 



The Bee Hive Store 



South Market and'Bainbridge Streets, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Dry Goods.Notions, Shoes, Carpets, Draperies and an Up-to-Date 
Gent's and Ladies' Furnishings 

"SOMETHING NEW EVERY DAY" 



line of 




The Duplex 

Recommends Literary 
and Commercial teachers 
Secretaries and Account- 
ants. Schools for sale. 
Circurlars free. Write 
for further information. 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



D. G. BRINSER 



Goa 



Grain, Flour, Feed, 
Seeds, Hay, Straw > 
and Fertilizer. \ 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 



*************** fe************** 

A farmer once to a certain age ^ 

/In the Lunch Room Business did en- 
gage. 

T'was Nissley. 
Thousands of people now are fed, 
Pure, delicious, quick. Enough said. 

TRY NISSLEY 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. 



Lunches 

D. W. Ml ESSE 

Baker and Confectioner 

123 N. Queen St. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Ice Cream 



Telephones 



Water Ice 






Ursinus College 

COLLEjaEVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 

(24 miles from Philadelphia.) 



Organized and administered under the Group Sys- 
tem of Instruction, providing both liberal culture and 
special preparation for the various vocations, an 
arrangement presenting exceptional advantages for 
efficiency and economy All groups open to women 
as well as men Write for special bulUtin and 
descriptive pamphlet. 

A. Edwin Keigwin D.D., President. 
Geo. Leslie Omwake, Pd.D., Vice-Pres 



* 
* 

* 






♦»♦♦♦♦♦»»♦»♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦»»»♦♦♦♦»♦♦ 

* Spalding Sporting Goods | 

Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, 2 

Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic T; 

Shoes. Kodaks .and Cameras, de- ^- 

veloping and finishing. ^ 

H. B. H E R R ♦^ 

30-32 West King Street X 

LANCASTER, PA. T 



iniiiiniiiiMiiiiaiiiiniiiiHiiioiiiiiiniiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiraiiiniiiiiniiiiniiii^ 
■ 

IF ITS MUSIC OR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, WE HAVE IT! 



M 



I 
I 



IkirR Johnson & Co. 



m 



MUSIC HALL 



■ 



lfe-1& West King Street, 



LAMCAtttER, PA. 



lii«iiiiifliiBiiiitH!i)iMHHiniiiiriaiiifl 



Mention Our Q)llege Times When Writing. 



31 



«A**^^*4M-****-**iM>^A*4****«*«A4**#**4**$^*AA**^**4S!*****A*A******^ 






lail Orders Solicited for 
Bool<s and Bibles 

THE BOOK STORE 



(> 



G. U. FALKER^STEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. Z 



(Painting anb Ipaper 
Ibanoing 

AMOS B. DRACE 

Ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 

Catalogues a Specialty 

311 W. Grant St., LANCASTER, PA. 



GRAYBILL 




College Hill Dairy 

Fresh milk and cream daily. All milk 

tested for children; free from tuberculosis 

HOTELS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED 



REBER WAGO«^SI 

is the cry of man and horse. The 
horse says "It pulls so easy" and the 
man says "It rides so nice and lasts 
so long." So come my neighbor, get 
yourself such an outfit and be pleased 
yet more than that. 

REBER WAGON WORKS 
Centreport, Pa. 



I TAKE YOURo 

f Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morning. 
Returns Wednesday and Friday afternoon, 

cALL.'i.T''" y '';';"''■'' ", 'i 

RALPH GROSS SHAVING PARLOr'^ 
Conducted on sanitary principles. 

Massaging a Specialty. 

Agency of First-Class UaMndry. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PBNNA. 



O. N. HEISEY 






b Provisions^ Xjfoceries, CS> Choice Candies ^ 






.^ HEISEY BUp^ING 



ELIZABET3HTO.WN, . - ,,, FW^A. «^ 



32 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Exchange 



Bank 



Transacts a general banking business, pays in- 
terest on time deposits, solicits your patronage 



OFFICERS 



A. G. HEISEY, Pres. 



ALLEN A. COBLE. Vice Pres, 



J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 



DIRECTORS 

A. G. Heisey Jos. G. Heisey B. H. Greider, 

Allen A. Coble Dr. H. K. Blou^h Henry E. Landis 

Dr. A, M. Kalbach Geo. D. Boggs E. E. Hernly 



H. J. Gisb, 
J. H. Bucb 



I P. N. Kraybill I 

^ Both 'Phones Z 

t Rheems. - Penn'a t 

« Dealer in Z 

^ Groceries, Dry Goods, Notions, Z 
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers Z 



Hardware, Paints, Oils, Turpen- 
tine and Glass 



«| Oilcloth, Linoleums, Matting, Win- 
dow Shades and Strips 



Soliciting a Share of Your Business * 



intiiiWiiiiBiiiniiiiiaiiiiiBii 



niiiiiBiiiiin 



Warner's 

Corsets 

are the only corsets that are en- 
dorsed so fully and strongly to us. 

Guaranteed to shape fashion- 
ably, to fit comfortably, and not 
to rust, break or tear. 

You connot say any more in 
favor of a corset excepting to give 
its price — 

$1.00 to $2.00 Per Pair 

If we could say just the things 
that we say about Warner's Rust- 
Proof Corsets, it would make 
any corset worth while ; but 
WARNER'S are the only corsets 
we can make this absolute state- 
ment regarding. 

Hunfzberger-Winters Co. 

ElilZABETHTO^W^N, PA. 



mil 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



"It's not what we say we do; 
It's what we do." 

How often have you read the promises of men? 

How often have you paid the pena Ity afterwards? 

We often question the advisability of telling about 
the clothes we sell, for talk is cheap. However, there is 
only one way to interest the man who doesn't know us 
and that is to advertise. So, we are forced to use this 
method of getting in touch with you. 

This advertisement is not going to say a single word 
about our clothes. Its only object is to invite you to 
visit our shop. When you arrive here we'll show you. 

Can we hope to see you soon? 

"FOLLOW THE ARROW" TO 

S. M. MYERS & CO. 

CLOTHIERS — FURNISHERS — HATTERS 
12 East King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Hertzler's Department Store 




Your needs supplied at satisfactory prices in Dry 
Goods, Groceries, Ready-to-Wear Clothing tor Men 
and Women of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oilclotli 
Shoes, Etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-Measure 



CLOTHING 



International Tailoring Co., New York. 
American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chicago. 
Up-to-Date Samiples on Hand. 



Black Cat 
Hosiery 



HERTZLER BROS. & CO. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pros. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits, $157,000.00 



General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid on special 
deposits. Safe deposit boxes for rent. 



DIRECTORS 



W. S. Smith Elmer W. Strickler Peter N. Rutt 

r W Grofl J- S. Risser B. U G-eyer 

a C. Ginder Amos G. Coble B. E. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



yMMMMMMMaMMMMaMMMf 



i 
i 






ANNOUNCEMENT ! 







A great many people are 
going to have their Photos 
taken this Spring, Why? 
Never before in the history 
of Lancaster county have 
they had a photographer 
that makes you look like 
yourself. . This Carl 
Schlotzhauer does to perfec- 
tion. The only studio of 
its kind in this part of the 
state outside of Philadel- 
phia. 







i 






STUDIO 

163 N. Queen St. 

OPPOSITE HOTEL WHEATLAND \ 
Lancaster, Pa. 



We Ar« Among The 
Largest Manufacturers 
Of Ready Made and 
Made to Order 



Plain 
Clothing 

In This Country 

When in Lancaster it will pay 
you to visit ours, the only 
Clothing Store in that city that 
has One Price to AH and gives 
discounts to none. See us for 

MEN'S READY MADE AND 
MADE TO ORDER 

Clothing 

AND 

Furnishing 

YOUTH'S AND BOYS' 
CLOTHING 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Since 1854 at 

Centre Square, Next to City Hall 

LANCASTER, .PA. 





O^'^^A/;. 




VACATION 5 

THE RIGHTS OF A CHILD 6 

LIFE AT ITS BEST 8 

AX APPEAL FROM THE SLUMS lo 

THE THEORY OF LIMITS '. 12 

EDITORIAL 15 

SCHOOL NOTES 19 

K. L. S. NOTES 20 

ALUMNI NOTES 22 

HOMERIAN NOTES 21 

BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY. . 23 

EXCHANGES 24 



ffiur fflnll^gf ®tm?s 



Vol. X EnzABicrHTowN, Pa., July, 1918 No. 10 



Vacation. 



These halls which but lately resounded with glee 
Are as drear as a port with its vessels at sea, 

As still as the vaults of the dead, yet as charmed 

As the fireside where childhood was sheltered and warmed. 

Like a casket which treasured a necklace of pearls, 

Or a crib where once nestled a brow wreathed in curls, 

So these precincts are hallowed, though cheerless today, 
^^'here young life has cherished the dream of its May. 

And will they return to enliven the port. 
Student craft of every description and sort. 

From their holiday cruise sailing over the main 
Return to renew the old friendships again ? 

Some will never, the farewell forever is said, 

The last parting salute o'er the waters has sped; 

O'er the wide, wide universe free shall they roam. 
Never sighting the port of the old college home. 

May none of these gay gallant cruisers so brave 

Prove a foundering wreck 'neath the billowy wave, 

But the voyage made safely 'mid tempest and shoal, 
Through the narrows sweep into the port of the soul. 



The Rights of the Child. 

C. L. Martin. 



AH through the cold winter days the 
flowers of spring time, the grain of 
summer, and the harvest of autumn 
lay hidden,— indeed Nature's dress 
all lay hidden in the little buds. The 
mighty sun in his majestic calmness 
entreated the flowers. The dripping, 
tapping, pattering rain knocked at 
their door. The blue bird, the wren, 
and the robin twittered their soprano, 
the old frog in the meadow croaked his 
bass to the rippling and rushing of 
the little stream and to the drumming 
of the woodpecker. And forth came 
the flowers dotting the hillside with 
gems of radiant beauty. 

As the buds of springtime grow 
into the fruit of autumn, and as the 
acorn bursts forth to be the gigantic 
monarch of the forest, so the child 
develops from helpless infancy to 
stately manhood. Rob the buds of 
sunshine, moisture and nourishment 
and they die, but care for them and 
they live adorning the earth with 
beauty and blessing it with plenty. 
Rob the child of good birth, sell his 
school days, let fate be the guardian 
of his soul and you contribute to the 
warfare between right and wrong one 
more demoniacal monster. Rear him 
well, care for his health, develop and 
guard his soul, educate him, and he 
will bloom forth an honest, mighty 
man, a jewel whose splendor shall 
shine through eternity. 

Every child has fundamental rights 
which must be fulfilled if he shall be 



worthy of his creation. Every child 
has an unquestionable right to be 
born well. But is he? The vilest and 
most wicked debaucher may legally 
help to perpetuate the American peo- 
ple. Every child has a legal claim to 
good health and a liberal education. 
Is he getting them, when the institu- 
tions for the physically, mentally, and 
morally defective claim more . people 
than all the colleges in the land, and 
when the fields and streets are dotted 
with children that ought to be in 
school? Every child has an unbound- 
ed right to good character — God wills 
that he shall have it, but no, from the 
very first the demoniacal forces of 
vanity with their dirty fingers strike 
all the discords of life from the divine 
instruments upon which only angels 
should play. 

Such is truth and upon its consider- 
ation hangs the destiny of our coun- 
try. Let us now investigate its pres- 
ent application. Many a time have I 
stood at these windows and scanned 
yon hillside and valley dotted with 
numberless fertile farms, equipped with 
the best machinery. Near me the town, 
hummed the busy tune of industry. I 
heard in the distance the chorus of 
school bells, I held my breath in 
terror; my heart thumped in anguish 
to know that the men of tomorrow, the 
boys of today, are forced to sell their 
school days to satisfy someone's 
greed for worldly attainments. The 
field, the street, the factory, the greed 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



for money, claim the boy. Pull from 
the tree of life the blossoms ere they 
become fruit, draw from the boy the 
vitality he needs for his own develop- 
ment and send him on the road to end- 
less inefficiency, increasing- misery, 
earthly debauchery, and eternal de- 
struction and yovir boy is gone. 

Mothers, when your child is lost in 
dreamland cuddled in his little bed 
think with me to the mine, the work- 
shop where hundreds of little fellows 
like yours in spite of law are wasting 
their lives to satisfy the greed for 
money. 

The question arises : Can these con- 
ditions be altered? The time and 
money wasted in Elizabethtown alone 
if economized would send ten boys 
each year to the best colleges in 
America, pave the streets, establish and 
maintain a public library, support an 
excellent, first-class High School, help 
every youth out of the factory, and 
place him in the school. Do we won- 
der where our resources go when one 
saloon's income for 1912 amounted to 
sixteen thousand dollars ; when 
enough time is wasted in one Satur- 
day night to build an average double 
dwelling house, and when our moving 
picture shows and pool tables rival 
our churches in finance. 

Daily by these processes boys and 
girls are being starved and actually 
murdered. Shoot a man down and the 
gallows is your end. Yet legislative 
bodies allow this progressive process 



of human butchery to go on and at 
the same time carefully guard the 
lives of the toads and frogs in their 
commonwealths. Our modern cow 
barns bear the notice: No Spitting 
ond the Floor. But I have seen the 
floor of a school house take the place 
of a school director's spittoon. Our at- 
titude toward our children in some re- 
spects is even far inferior to our at- 
titude toward the meanest brutes of 
the dust. 

The scene of distress is before you. 
Through its blackness I see the flames 
of fury. Over it hovers the fiery cloud 
of divine wrath. I hear with horror 
the thundering of remorse, the shrieks 
of misery, and the rattling- of the vice 
machines of greed, of love of money, 
of vain pleasures, go leaping tumbling 
rolling to the very jaws of hell carry- 
ing with them every child that falls in 
their way. 

The heartless beasts commonly 
called man look on this scene un- 
moved. In it there is no significance 
for them. But so great is its meaning 
that truth even speaks forth. Mighty 
works of men are not mere fortunes, 
but he is great who brings to light the 
good in others, oppresses evil, and 
crowns righteousness king. He is 
great who lifts the soul a little higher. 
Then back with the man who has only 
houses and lands, only fortunes and 
farms, and bring to the front the man 
who guards the rights of the child. 



Life at Its Best, 



C. J. Rose 



The most perplexing problem which 
confronts the scientists today is the 
discovery of some means through 
which life may be created. All their 
efforts in this direction have been in 
vain. God alone can create life. Ask 
a child what life is, it will answer life 
is play; ask some fair maiden, she will 
answer life is pleasure ; ask a soldier, 
he will say life is glory; ask a states- 
man, he will say life is emptiness ; but 
ask a real, consecrated mother what 
life is and she will answer life is love, 
hope, joy, strife, and duty, and in this 
sense, let us consider Life at its Best. 
True service to humanity comes only 
through the person who is conscious 
of his duty, and strives earnestly, 
patiently, and sincerely to fulfill his 
mission in life. 

Life is divided into three stages : 
life before birth, life after birth, and 
life beyond this world. Each period is 
dependent upon the other. A child's 
training should begin before it is born 
The mother's physical, mental, and 
moral life is in her blood. Through 
her blood the child is furnished not 
only with air, water, and food ; but 
with life. Love and anger, joy and 
fear, grief and jealousy, all change the 
character of the blood, and influence 
the life and energy of the mother and 
her offspring. Each new being born 
into this world is the sum total of all 
the influences, good and bad, of his 
ancestry. The child is largely the pro- 
duct of its parents through their 
blended personalities. 



In the next place, let us consider 
life after bjrth. The early training 
which a child receives in the home and 
the school will determine largely the 
extent to which he will fulfill his life 
purpose. The time to train a child in 
order that he may be self-directive in 
later life is when the mind is plastic. 
Habits are formed in early life. Hence, 
the greatest care should be taken to 
have the child form good habits, in- 
stead of bad ones. Discretion must be 
exercised in helping the child choose 
his companions. Environment is a 
great factor in moulding and in influ- 
encing the life of a child. Make the 
environment what it should be, and 
you will have a well-trained child. 

The plea comes today for energetic, 
industrious, trustworthy young men 
and women. To meet this demand, 
they must be taught the ability to di- 
rect their own culture and the desire to 
build sterling character. The young 
must school themselves for service, in- 
stead of being satisfied with present at- 
tainments. This schooling should con- 
sist in developing all the inherent fac- 
ulties, instead of only a few. The mot- 
to must be : "Depth for efficienc)^ and 
breadth for power'', otherwise, the boy 
or the girl will not be able to cope with 
the stern realities of life. Their life 
purpose will be frustrated, and they 
will live in ignorance. Life at its best 
is lived only by those who possess 
noble, genuine character, and are in- 
strumental in lifting the race to higher 
standards of living. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Martin Luther, in early life, saw the 
great need of making the best use of 
his opportunities. He Avas aware of 
the fact that true character could neve^ 
be realized by idling away time and by 
seeking the pleasures of this world. 
His God-given talents were developed 
in time of great oppression through his 
boldness, determination, self-reliance, 
and his faith in God. Hds moral 
courage caused him to stand firm on 
the rock of reason, holding high above 
his head in every flood, the Word of 
God. His immortal words, when ask- 
ed to recant his statements against the 
doctrines of the Papal Church, were 
these: "I can retract nothing unless 
I am convinced either from Scripture 
or by clear argument. Here I stand. 
I can do nothing else. God help me." 

Booker T. Washington, the Ameri- 
can negro educator experienced many 
trials and hardships in his youth. In 
the face of all this, he schooled himself 
in order that he might instil into his 
own race higher ideals of living. In 
all his noble undertakings, he has met 
with the greatest success. He is not 
only known as a man of earnestness 
and power, but also as a farsighted and 
practical reformer. 

Horace IMann, one of the most dis- 
tinguished of American educators made 
an earnest effort to uplift mankind 
philanthropically, educationally, and 
religiously. No man was more strong- 
ly moved by the modern passion for 
social improvement. Although he met 
with great opposition, he conquered 
through his earnestness and enthusi- 
asm which spurred him on to action. 
His practical ideas, his devotion to 
truth and right, his sense of duty, his 
unselfishness, his benevolence, all were 



marked characteristics which will con- 
tinue to wield a powerful influence, at 
all times, throughout the educational 
world. 

Frances Willard, the great tem- 
perance reform or America, was the 
heroine of a thousand conflicts, the 
victorious leader of a thousand battles 
in the cause of right. She w^s the 
most unique woman the ages have 
produced. She was filled with en- 
thusiasm and zeal, love to God and to 
humanity. Angelic anthems chanted 
by countless multitudes can recount 
only the valorous deeds of this remark- 
able heroine. It is said: "Long after 
the temperance reform has become a 
matter of history, long after the 
"Woman Question" has brought about 
the equality of men and women, politi- 
cal, social, and financial, the name of 
Frances Willard will be remembered, 
not only as one who led a great move- 
ment, but as one who gave her life, 
her talent, her enthusiasm, to make the 
world wider for women and better for 
humanity." These are a few of the 
many examples of noble-hearted men 
and women who have lived Life at 
its Best. 

The supreme need in this world to- 
day is men who have enthroned the 
spiritual life. Without God there can 
be no complete unfolding, growth, 
development or progress. It matters 
little how many talents you have, but 
it matters a great deal more how you 
develop and then use those talents in 
service to humanity. Let us ever re- 
member that as we live up to our op- 
portunities, as we educate ourselves, 
and as we bring ourselves in tune with 
the Infinite, can our lives be an ever- 
lasting hymn of praise to Him who 
rules on high. 



An Appeal From the Slums. 

Rebekah S. Sheaffer. 



Go with me if you will while we 
walk down Water street, New York 
City. Keep your senses about you or 
you may be torn from me by the thous- 
ands of people rushing here and there 
seeking food and shelter. As we pass 
along, we are attracted by a massive 
structure. A faint cry from one of its 
windows hundreds of feet above de- 
scends to our ears. Curious we enter a 
doorway when we find ourselves in a 
dingy, dirty hall that terminates half 
a block to the rear in a dark narrow 
stairway. After ascending six flights 
of stairs, we have gone only half way 
to the room from which the cry came. 
Fnally, we reach the tenth floor. A ray 
of light from a nearby room attracts 
us. Wie pause and enter. Here are 
two children lying on one cot ; one af- 
flicted with tuberculosis, the other suf- 
fering from a broken leg. A baby is 
playing in the filth on the floor. The 
mother is bending over a washtub and 
is weeping because of her husband who 
is lying in delirium tremens in a ren- 
dezvous in the Bowery. In this con- 
dition we find thousands of families as 
we pass through one square. 

In this, God's world where Nature 
calls forth in everything the sublime, 
where prosperity overshadows the re- 
motest avenue, where love makes its 
path into the deepest recesses, where 
service characterizes every living thing 
(from the amoeba to man) there exist 
such conditions as terrify the imagina- 
tive mind. 



Instead of green lawns, we find in 
the tenement districts of our cities 
nothing but miserable streets; instead 
of the chirpings and warblings of birds 
we hear the cry of distressed children. 
Massive buildings, the art of man, take 
the place of the forests, the handiwork 
of God. Doorsteps and alleys furnish 
here Avhat fine lawns afford to rural 
life. The workshop is converted into 
a gambling den and the home is sup- 
planted by the saloon. 

From such places as these we hear a 
voice smothered as it were by filth, 
debauchery and crime, telling of the 
agony endured by the helpless, and the 
misery and degradation suffered by the 
innocent. A most agonizing cry as- 
cends to our ears from those who exist 
in the midst of this environment. A 
cry for mercy it is from those who are 
dying in the clutches of ruin. 

We have heard the voice telling us 
of the slums. We have recognized the 
cry in the slums. We must acquaint 
ourselves with the appeal for help from 
the slums. 

As early as 1820 the appeal came to- 
ns as a result of the eight thousand im- 
migrants who thronged into our ports. 
Crowded conditions of the city were at 
once felt. Because of the great de- 
mand for houses, rents were raised and 
consequently the poor aliens — immoral 
many — with poorer Americans were 
forced to seek homes in the undesirable 
portions of the city. Each year 
brought its six, eight or ten thousand 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



more until in 1865 the annual influx? 
had increased to 200,000. It lead to a 
congested population, to poverty, 
crime, and immorality. 

It gave rise to economic problems 
that had never before existed and the 
situation in the slums waxed more and 
more intolerable until today the appeal 
comes to us as a demand — a demand 
that needs our greatest capabilities and 
most strenuous efforts. 

Why does this appeal come to us? 
It springs naturally from the trinity 
of evils: — intemperance, pauperism, 
and crime. Drink, gambling, white 
slave traffic — these are forces at work 
tearing down what the church, reform- 
er, and society are aiming to uphold. 
The appeal comes as the result of the 
former and the answer must come as 
the work of the latter. 

"There are many who in times of 
obvious crises, when the bugle sum- 
mons to battle, cheerfully make great 
sacrifice even unto death, but who in 
times of peace are unwilling to give 
any time or effort to public good," not- 
withstanding this, God has sown in 
some souls the seed of his bounteous 
mercy and the reaping day is coming. 
Rescue missions, socialized churches 
and social settlements are being in- 
stituted. Among those few prophetic 
souls who recognize the essential 
oneness of society and try to express 
it in practical living is Jane Addams of 
Hull House fame. She is the founder 
of the Pioneer Social Settlement of 
America, which she started in the 
slums of Chicago, which has lifted 
thousands from veritable cesspools of 
perdition to positions of rank and 
"homes of splendor. 

If one magnanimous soul can ac- 



complish this, how much more can be 
done if all do their duty? Every in- 
dividual must put on the armor of 
righteousness and determine to re- 
lieve those who are down in the very 
pits of sin. He must act his part as 
a royal citizen and help to make a 
government that will stand for the 
right ; that will enact laws to crush 
forever these gigantic forces of evil. 

It is time for each one of us to 
recognize that he is a capable and re- 
sponsible unit in the great aggregation 
of the masses. Whether we live in 
palace or hut, it is ours to sacrifice 
ourselves to the work, to devote all 
our powers to the rescue- of the poor 
creatures of the underworld. 

It is the duty of the church to 
answer the appeal by improving both 
people and tenements. We believe 
that the New Jerusalem comes down 
from God and that before help can be 
given, religion must be brought to bear 
on the people in the tenement dis- 
tricts. Cooperation of all churches is 
necessitated by this demand in this 
great fight. For a social regeneration 
we must save the city to save the 
nation ; we must rid the slums of all 
evil ; we must rid the city of all 
slums, or see our young people rush 
into endless ruin, society into nothing- 
ness, and the nation into disgrace. 

Oh, Americans. Can you not hear 
the cry from these afflicted ones? Do 
you not see their degradation? Can 
you not feel their very life ebb away 
under such oppression? Will you sit 
idly by, in ease and luxury while others 
die at your very door? 

Men and women, it is for us to save 
the city. It is for us to be a father 
to the fatherless, a husband to the 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



widow. The appeal has come. We 
must face this problem. It demands 
our immediate attention. 

Then let us enter the fight ! Let 
us rise in our strength ! Let us wage 
this war for the abolition of every sin 
of the slums. Let us cast out the 
saloon, the brothel, the gambling den, 



and in their place, substitute the home, 
the school, the church. 

Let us make of the city, a center of 
civic and moral righteousness, that it 
may, indeed become a haven for ideal 
citizenship, a boon to the industrial 
world, a support to our civil govern- 
ment, an honor to the nation, and a 
glory to God. 



The Theory of Limits. 

E. G. Diehm 



Unroll with me the scroll of His- 
tory and study for a few minutes con- 
ditions in ancient Egypt. We fitid 
that about three thousand years be- 
fore Christ the Nile River would at 
times overflow its banks and after the 
waters had receded the Egyptian 
peasants discovered that parts of their 
rich soil had been washed away. This 
made it necessary for them to re- 
measure the land and reestablish the 
land marks which they did by dividing 
the land into quadrilaterals. Thus 
away back in Egypt over four thousand 
years ago originated the principle from 
which grew the magnificent science of 
Geometry. Geometry in its literal 
sense means earth measure; but today 
it is known as the science of certain 
abstractions which the mind makes 
concerning form. In this science of 
Geometry which has passed through 
five dififerent epochs of development; 
namely, the Egyptian, the Greek, the 



Hindo, the Arabic, and the European 
is found the most remarkable theory 
in mathematics, the Theory of Limits. 
The rigor of modern analysis depends 
upon the high state of perfection of 
this theory. The mensuration of 
curves and surfaces, the treatment of 
series, and the foundation of Calculus 
rest upon this theory. The Theory of 
Limits then as we understand it, is 
simply this : We endeavor to walk 
across this room, we walk half 
the distance, we become a variable ap- 
proaching that wall as a limit, we walk 
half of the remaining distance, and con- 
tinue each time walking half of the 
remaining half, but in theory we will 
never reach that wall because there is 
always a half remaining. The funda- 
mental laws governing the Theory oi 
Limits are the commensurable and in- 
commensurable magnitudes. The com- 
mensurable magnitudes are magni- 
tudes that have a common unit of 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



measure while the incommensurable 
magnitudes vary in value, hence do not 
have a common unit of measure. 

Just as we have in the Theory of 
Limits in 'Geometry commensurable 
and incommensurable magnitudes so 
we have in the Theory of Limits of life 
commensurable and incommensurable 
ideals. The commensurable ideals 
have a common unit of measure and 
can be reached, while the incommen- 
surable ideals do not have a common 
unit of measure and cannot be attained. 
The incommensurable ideals are those 
pertaining to education ; such as teach- 
ing and Christianity. The commen- 
surable ideals are such as manual labor, 
not involving Christianity or higher 
education for service which tends 
toward the uplift of humanity. 

Today we are living in an age of 
moral and political corruption and the 
only way by which the standard of 
morality can be raised is for the 
Home and the School of our country 
to implant into the hearts of our boys 
and girls true ideals or incommensur- 
able limits toward which to strive. 
The only way in which a young man 
can reach success is to have constantly 
before him a high ideal. Oh, I do not 
means success measured by dollars and 
cents but by a higher standard of meas- 
urement — service. Service is the law 
of life. We are not independent be- 
ings, but we are dependent upon others 
and others are dependent upon us. 

The fact that only three out of every 
one hundred young men and women 
are enthusiastic enough to take advan- 
tage of the splendid opportunities of 
acquiring a college education and the 
fact that there are more insane people 
in our country than college students 



tells us that there is something radical- 
ly wrong. When we consider the state- 
ment made by our Secretary of- Statej.. 
"That the suffering endured by womei* 
in motherhood and in rearing families 
is greater than all the suffering in alii 
the wars combined," can we not in a. 
small measure feel the grief that comes 
to a mother when her boy or girl goes 
wrong? Can we not understand why- 
a mother is so desirous of her childreilj 
making the best of life? 

Yet in the face of all this thousands. 
of young men and women throw their 
lives away. Wlhy? Merely because:- 
they fail early in youth to form a high-^ 
ideal, a limit which may never abso- 
lutely be attained but toward which 
every young man and woman should; 
aim. Which class of ideals are we go- 
ing to choose? Will it be the commen- 
surable limit which with a little effort 
on our part can be attained, or will it 
be the incommensurable ideal which 
will be so far distant that it cannot be 
reached by leaps and bounds, but in 
which we become variables approach- 
ing our ideals as a limit little by little. 
It is no doubt the incommensurable 
ideal to which Emerson refers in one 
of his essays when he says, "Now that 
is the wisdom of a man in every in- 
stance of his labor to hitch his wagon- 
to a star, and see his chore done by 
the Gods themselves. We cannot 
bring heavenly powers to us but, if we- 
will only choose our jobs in the direc- 
tion in which they travel, they will 
undertake them with the greatest 
pleasure." Let us indeed hitch our 
Avagons to stars, and though 
we often become discouraged 

let us divide that incommensurable 
ideal by labor as a common unit ot 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



measure, remembering that all men 
who are remembered for their deeds 
have become great by virtue of the in- 
commensurable goal which they had 
constantly before them and by the 
struggle they underwent to reach it. 
Our best literary productions were 
"written by men and women in adverse 
■circumstances. Bunyan wrote his im- 
mortal Pilgrim's Progress upon the 
untwisted papers used to cork the bot- 
tles of milk brought for his meals. J. 
H. Green's History of England was 
written when he was in mortal illness. 
Milton wrote Paradise Lost when he 
was blind, decrepit, and defeated By 
liis party. Washington, the Father of 
our Country, had before him the incom- 
mensurable ideal of service to his 
•country. Lincoln who is regarded as 
the Savior of our Country had written 
out an ideal code of laws for himself. 

So it has been and ever shall be. A 
shield will not shine until it is rubbed 
and polished. A diamond is not most 
brilliant until it has undergone the se- 
verest grinding. The world wants 
men, real men. Let us choose high 
ideals and become true men. Men who 
will enter this individual life and make 
men wiser, better, diviner ; men who 
will enter this national life and make 



our government purer. The moral law 
as set forth in the Bible is a limit of 
perfection and our government will 
be ideal only when through the means 
of men with high ideals, the civil law 
of our country as a variable approaches 
as near as possible the moral law. Let 
us choose the Savior as an incommen- 
surable ideal. Christ is the limit of 
perfection. He lived a life of sacrifice 
and service, the only true measure of 
success. Young men ! Young women ! 
Let us indeed become variables ap- 
proaching Him as a limit, little by lit- 
tle, step by step, "adding to our faith 
virtue, and to virtue knowledge, and 
to knowledge temperance, and to tem- 
perance patience, and patience godli- 
ness, and to godliness brotherly kind- 
ness,and to brotherly kindness charity,'* 
and even though in this life it is impos- 
sible to quite reach Him as the limit of 
perfection. He will after we have done 
our part fill the gap that remains be- 
tween our attainments and the limit of 
our ideal. For when we reach the 
brink of Time, we hope to meet our 
Pilot face to face and have Him bear 
us safely over the chasm between Time 
and Eternity, and launch us safely into 
the Haven of Rest. 



"^@>^?^<©^' 




EDITORIAL BOARD. 

RALPH W. SCHLOS^ER, '11, Editor-in-Chief 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 



Okville Z. Beckkr, '15 School Notes 

Nora L. Rkber, '11 Homerian News 

Mary Scheaffek, '13: K. L. 8. News 

Leah Sheaffer, '09 Alumni Notes 



C. L. Martin, '13 .., 

J. D. Reber, '14 

A. L. Reber, '13 

Daisy P. Rider, 'lU, 



Exohanee* 

Bus. Mer. 

, Asst. Bus. Mgr, 
Art Editor 



Our College Times is published raonthlv durins? the Academic year by Elizabethtown College. 

Arrearage on subscription to this paper is charged. 

Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates:— Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy ; five years Un $2 OU. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown PostotKce. 



COMMENCEMENT WEEK 
— Christian Workers' Meeting 

The exercises of Commencement 
week began on the evening of June 
8, when a very interesting Christian 
Workers' Meeting was held with Miss 
Leah M. Sheaffer as leader. The 
theme discussed was "The Christian 
Workers' Meeting." Mr. L. W. 
Leiter discussed the topic, "Who Shall 
Serve?" He showed the purpose of 
the meeting and then urged that every- 
one should take part in these meet- 
ings. Mr. J. D. Reber then spoke on 
"How to Conduct the Christian 



Workers' Meeting?" He emphasized 
the duty of the leader and that of the 
program committee in selecting 
speakers. Mr. B. F. Waltz followed 
on "The Relation of the College Stu- 
dent to the Christian Workers' Meet- 
ing." He presented the idea that she 
college student must support the 
meeting, take only his share of the 
time, and not be a fault finder of the 
work of those who have not had school 
advantages. Mr. I. J. Kreider discus- 
sed"The Relation of the Sunday school 
to the Christian Workers' Meeting.'* 
He said that in the Sunday School 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the child learns of God and worship 
and in the Christian Workers' Meeting 
he puts into practice what he learns. 
Mr. H. H. Nye closed the discussion 
oh the topic, "The Relation of the 
Church to the Christian Workers'Meet- 
ing." Ke pictured the Christian 
Workers' Meeting as a department of 
church work that needs the supervision 
of the church, the attendance of 
every member, and the workers for 
the programs. This relation would 
■l)ring about unity of work. 

Baccalaureate Sermon 

This service was opened by a short 
■spiritual prayer by Bro. Rufus P. 
Bucher. The sermon to the graduates 
was preached by Eld. I. W. Taylor of 
Neffsville. It was a sodl-inspiring 
sermon full of good counsel and timely 
admonition. Bro. Taylor selected for 
the basis of his remarks Jno. 14:31 and 
II Sam. 15:15. He spoke in part as 
follows : "The interest in and the in- 
fluence of this institution is shown by 
your presence and we trust this spirit 
will continue. There are two things in 
life that must be observed if success is 
to be attained: First, we must not get 
an idea of abandonment; second, we 
must be conscious of the duty await- 
ing us. A sermon of this nature is 
rather customary and yet may be need- 
ed at some schools more than at others 
because of the lack of religious train- 
ing. 

"Without the blessings brought by 
Christ we could not live. He has 
"brought two kinds of blessings to man : 
the universal gift to every one, and the 
special gifts to a certain people on a 
certain condition. The universal gift 
is Christ himself who unconditionally 



surrendered himself for us. (Jno. 10: 
11). Full surrender makes life easier. 
There are many special gifts offered to 
those who will have them. It is our 
privilege to become sons of God, (Jno. 
I :i2). Jesus is the only source of power 
to deliver us from the bondage of sin. 
He gives us peace. (Jno. 14:27). Many 
things are precious to us, but his peace 
is above all that the world can give. 
It follows you all through life while in 
a righteous calling. It will help you to 
perform the duties of life. He also 
gave us an example. (Jno. 13:15). 
His life was the influential life. Our 
influence will go out just as we are re- 
lated to Christ. We can not live a 
day without leaving an influence. Life 
will be successful if we go out with 
the inspiration of Jesus Christ. Do 
not get an idea that your church does 
not have quite all there is to be gotten. 
Do not be about half ashamed of your 
church. If you live the life of a Chris- 
tian, the world will respect you. 
"As you go out into life you will meet 
some evils, and many of them are not 
gross evils but the deceptive evils of 
society. You have more to face than 
the past generation. There are so 
many social evils not generally recog- 
nized by churches as evils. Many 
have made it a part of their religion 
their pulpits dare not sound against 
them. 

"There are about sixteen thousand 
moving picture shows in the United 
States and on an average each one is 
patronized by about five hundred peo- 
ple daily. This means that about eight 
million people go to these shows every 
day, and about 75 per cent, of what is 
seen there has a downward tendency. 
They are the source of many that went 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



to ruin. We must stand unflinchingly 
against these. 

"Then there is the modern dance. It 
has a strong tendency to lead a ruined 
life. It is the ruination not only of the 
unmarried but even of the married. 
Plato said : 'Virtue is knowledge. We 
are wrong because of ignorance.' The 
Savior has given us power to stand 
above all. For Christ and the Church 
may you loyally stand." 



Musical Program. 

The musical program rendered on 
Monday evening, June 9, was a treat 
to all lovers of music. Misses Carrie 
Dennis and Delia Shank were the two 
graduates in this department this year. 
The program consisted of vocal solos, 
duets, trios, and chorus class selections. 
There were also a number of piano 
■solos, duets, and quartets. Miss Kath- 
Tyn Aliller conducted the chorus class 
in an excellent manner, and Miss Leah 
M. Sheaffer directed the instrumental 
work. A large and appreciative audi- 
ence was present to hear this program. 



Commercial Program. 

The commercial program was ren- 
dered on Tuesday evening, June 10, to a 
large audience in the Chapel. Profes- 
sor Isaac Hackman and Miss Anna 
Wolgemuth had the program in charge. 
The program, which was up to the 
standard, consisted of orations, essays, 
and an address by Dr. W. E. Dengler, 
Principal of the Philadelphia Business 
College. The room was artistically 
decorated for the occasion and showed 
much originality. Dr. Dengler said in 
part: 



"We are beginning to realize that 
business is service, and service is di- 
vine. We are learning that living a 
life and earning a living are the same 
thing. The world is a school-room. 
Learning and education do not cease 
at Commencement. The extent to 
which we measure success by leisure 
is the extent of our barbarianism. Suc- 
cess means getting away from leisure. 
We are happiest when we live natural- 
ly. Tell me something of a man's re- 
ligion and I will tell you of his chance 
for success. We must be more than 
good, we must be good for something. 
For every negative there must be a 
positive. The man who succeeds is a 
worker. We must not only work, but 
work with an object in view. Chang- 
ing of purpose has no place in success. 
We must be persevering or we will lose. 
The best way to honor or serve God 
is to honor and serve mankind. Dig- 
nity of labor must be upheld. We pre- 
pare for war to get peace, and we get 
what we prepare for. We usually see 
what we look for. Every man ought 
to be a producer and not only a con- 
sumer. There is a wrong principle un- 
derlying the standing army. The in- 
sane are not insane all the time more 
than the sane are sane all the time. 
The secret of success is co-operation. 
We must be of the productive type of 
men not of the speculative kind. Suc- 
cess is not in speculation but in pro- 
duction. We are changing our tactics 
in business as well as elsewhere today. 
We are no longer doctoring the symp- 
toms but the cause of disease. If you 
can not succeed at home you can not 
succeed in San Francisco. You must 
recognize your opportunities at home. 
After all there is no secret of success." 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Class Day Program. 
On Wednesday afternoon, June ii, 
the Senior class rendered a commenda- 
ble program. The president of the 
class, Mr. C. L. Martin, gave a short 
address of welcome. Miss Nora L. 
Reber delivered a pertinent oration on 
tht "Unwritten Laws of College Life." 
The class history by M^iss Ruth Lan- 
dis and the class prophecy by Mr. E. 
G. Diehm were well written and dis- 
tinctly read. They contained much 
humor and the prophecy was of such 
a nature that its fulfilment is not an 
impossibility. The class presented as 
a memorial to the College, a set of 
books on history. The program was 
closed by singing the class song. 

Alumni Program. 

The Alumni Association held their 
public program in the Chapel on Wed- 
nesday evening, June ii. The pro- 
gram was of a high grade and was lis- 
tened to by a large audience. Presi- 
dent John Miller in his humorous way 
delivered the address of welcome. He 
was all smiles ; (but why should he 
not have been so? his second little las- 
sie arrived just a few weeks ago.) 
Kathryn T. Moyer then recited the im- 
pressive story of Mary, Queen of 
Scots. She recited her selection in a 
very commendable manner and we con- 
gratulate her on her choice of a selec- 
tion. Mr. Amos P. Geib of Brooklyn, 
New York, then delivered the address 
of the evening on the subject, "The 
H'ope of Immortality." It was a diffi- 
cult subject handled in an admirable 
manner. He forcibly showed that the 
end of man's existence is not here, and 
gave many illustrations showing the 
reasons for an immortality of the soul. 
He showed much study of the subject 
and familiarity with poets and other 
writers on this great theme. 



Commencement Program. 

On Thursday morning, June 12, the 
thirteenth annual commencement ex- 
ercises were held. The invocation was 
impressively oflfered by Eld. S. H. 
Hertzler. The following nine orations 
were delivered by graduates in various 
courses : 
"The Rights of the Child," 

C. L. Martin- 
"The True Value of Music," 

Carrie Dennis 
"The Duty of the American," 

Ira Herr 

"A Voice from the Throne," 

Mary A. Scheaflfer 

"The Theory of Limits." E. G. Diehm 

"Nature — An Open Book," 

Rhoda Miller 
"The Heart's Response," 

Sara T. Moyer 
"Life At Its Best," C. J. Rose 

"An Appeal from the Slums," 

Rebekah Sheaflfer 

All these orations were delivered in 
a creditable, manner. They showed 
great care in their preparation : they 
<5eemed to be the outburst of some- 
thing felt within the life of each orator. 
The tenor of the productions showed a 
firm stand upon the great moral issues 
of the age. 

These orations were interspersed by 
musical selections by the chorus class 
and the ladies' quartet. 

Dr. Reber gave a short farewell ad- 
dress to the class in which he stated 
some of the things that would be re- 
quired of the graduates after leaving" 
school. This was followed by the pre- 
sentation of the diplomas. 

In a very impressive way. amid the 
tears of quite a few. Dr. Reber then 
dismissed school and announced that 
school would open again on September 

I. 1913- 

Thus passed one of the most inspir- 
ing Commencement Weeks ever held 
on College Hill. 




s 


















t 



L 



S 



As the month of June closes and we 
enter upon the summer month of July, 
we leave behind us one of the most en- 
joyable and successful spring terms 
and Commencement weeks that Eliza- 
"bethtown College has ever seen. The 
programs and associations of Com- 
mencement week will long be remem- 
Ibered not only by the august senior 
-class but by the whole student body. 
Ideal weather prevailed during the last 
-weeks of school, such that we could 
truly say with Lowell : 
■"And what is so rare as a day in June? 
Then if ever, come perfect days." 
Especially when made dear by mem- 
ories of your graduation or your school 
days. 

At half-past eleven on Thursday, 
June the twelfth. President D. C. Reber 
dismissed the school for this school 
year to reconvene on the first of Sep- 
tember, nineteen hundred and thirteen, 
when we expect to see most of the old 
students back on College Hill accom- 
panied by many new faces. 

Any person who desires to have a 
catalogue of the school to obtain par- 



ticulars for the coming school year will 
have one cheerfully sent by writing to 
President D. C. Reber, Elizabethtown, 
Pa. 

The Senior class of this year num- 
bered thirty-four including the gradu- 
ates from the Industrial Department. 

The base ball season closed with the 
usual games between the Seniors and 
Juniors, and between the Alumni and 
the School. The Seniors lost to the 
Juniors by a score of 26 to 14. 
The Alumni was beaten by a score of 
23 to 12. 

Charles A. Schwenk, a former stu- 
dent of Elizabethtown College, was 
ordained to the eldership of the Sugar 
\''alley Congregation on May 19. 

Great interest was manifested in 
tennis throughout the whole term and 
the tennis court was the Mecca of 
many happy times. 

Teacher in History: "Who was 
Gladstone?" 

Student: "Gladstone was the first 
missionary in China and did much for 
missions in that country." 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Mr. J. Z. Hackman who recently 
graduated in the Commercial Cource 
has since that time bought the Master- 
sonville store and has entered the busi- 
ness world. 

Miss Brubaker: "I am not the only- 
one that watches the sun (son) rise 
from the cottage. Miss Rebekah 
Sheaffer does TOO." 

The mother, sister and brothers of 
Misses Grace and Sara Moyer spent 
Commencement week on College Hill. 

C. L. Martin. ''One of my favorite 
songs is 'Through Grace I'll Win the 
Promised Crown.' " 

Mr. Rose : "Gimme that piece of pie 
or do you want it Miss Brubaker?" 

Question : "Did you. ever see Mack 
Falkenstein hypnotize a rooster in the 
College barn? It's great." 

Have you learned who the poet from 
College Hill is that composed the 
poems for the College Times for the 
past year under the name of "Nescis'?" 
It was our beloved professor, J. S. 
Harley. 

Miss Naomi Longenecker of Pal- 
myra is on the Physical Culture Com- 
mittee for the coming year. 

Mr. C. J. Rose formerly the College 
mail-carrier will succeed Mr. B. F. 
Waltz as the College Librarian. 

Miss Edna Brubaker and Mr. A. L. 
Reber spent the Sunday following 
Commencement very pleasantly at the 
home of Miss Lilian Becker. 

Mr. Gingrich is said to have a flower 
in his herbarium, the common name of 
which he thinks is "Heart's disease." 

Professor Schlosser is building a 
bungalow on the corner of Mt. Joy 
and Orange streets, which he intends 
to occupy by the time school re-opens. 



It is said that Professor Harley does 
not own a comb thus saving quite an 
expense. 

The College Hill male quartet has 
had another very successful season. 

Mr. Lineaweaver's favorite flower is 
the Morning glory. 

Mr. Hiram Eberly who graduated 
in the Commercial course has a posi- 
tion as bookkeeper and stenographer 
in Lancaster. 

Miss Dohner being very much 
pleased when she received a 
present said : "Why, I was smiled all 
over." 

Messrs. Waltz and Leiter will take 
the last year's work of the college 
course at Franklin and Marshall Col- 
lege. 

Miss Price to the mail-man: "I 
thought I would get a Nice letter this 
evening." She is now Mrs. Nyce. 

The parents, sisters and friends of 
Miss Hoffman and of Mr. Hoflfman 
who graduated in the Agricultural 
course were on College Hill during 
Commencement week. 

The evening following the purchase 
of a new raincoat Mr. H. was seen 
sitting on the pavement in the rain 
for a long time so as to test his new- 
purchase. 

We are sorry to learn the news that 
Miss Leah Sheaffer will no longer be 
seen on College Hill as our instru- 
mental music teacher. We wish her 
success and happiness in her new- 
vocation and environment. 


K. L. S. Notes 

The Society met in a private ses- 
sion on May 30, 1913 at which time 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



the following officers were elected for 
the remainder of this term. Pres., 
Mary Hershey; Vice Pres., Elam Zug; 
Sec, Edna Wenger; Critic, C. L. 
Martin; Editor, Grace Moyer; Treas., 
Henry Brandt ; Chor., Wm. Kulp ; Re- 
porter, Jacob Gingrich ; Recorder, 
Mamie Price; Custodian, C. J. Rose. 

On June 6 the Society met in regu- 
lar Literary Session. The officers 
were inaugurated after which the fol- 
lowing program was rendered : 
President's Address 
Piano Solo— "Rustic Chit Chat"— by 

Edna Wenger. 
Select Reading — "Commencement" 

Grace Moyer. 

Debate— Resolved, "That punishment 
by imprisonment is unjust." Debated 
affirmatively by Miss Price and Mr. 
Shelly, negatively by Miss Brubaker 
and Mr. Graham. The judges decided 
in favor of the negative. 
Recitation — Ruth Coble. 
Music — Quartette. 



Homerian News 

At the last private meeting of this 
school year little business was trans- 
acted. When the last election for new 
officers was held a treasurer should 
have been elected, but he was not 
elected until our last meeting. The 
majority of members then voted for J. 
D. Reber after which the secretary de- 
clared him elected as treasurer for the 
coming year. 

The Homerian Society has now been 
organized for about two years. In 
comparing the accomplishments of 
these two years it will be noted with 
pleasure that this year has been one 
of steady progress. Its membership 
is increasing and the members are be- 
coming thoroughly familiar with the 
new constitution. A few of our old 
students and loyal members of this 
society are leaving us not to return 
next year. The support which these 
members gave us is felt and it must 
be replenished by those graduates who 
are now eligible to membership. Thus 
far the society has held to its standard 
of dignity and advancement. 




Many members of the Association 
were in attendance at the Commence- 
ment exercises this year. The Annual 
Luncheon was served on Wednesday. 
About eighty people were present. The 
Luncheon was followed by the annual 
public program. All these meetings 
were enjoyed by all. 

Amos P. Geib, '09, gave a very fine 
talk on the evening of June li. Mr. 
Geib surely has been developing his 
talents since he left E'town. 

We have not yet learned the name 
of the new baby girl who came to the 
home of John Miller a few months 
ago. One more name can be added 
to the cradle roll. 

J. D. Reber, '09, is at present selling 
Aluminum ware in Berks county. Af- 
ter his tour he expects to enter the 
University of Pennsylvania prior to his 
assuming the position as head of the 
Commercial Department at Elizabeth- 
town next year. 

L. W. Leiter, '10, expects to resume 
his work at Elizabethtown for the 
summer. Next year he and B. F. 
Waltz will complete their College 



course at Franklin and Marshall Col- 
lege, Lancaster Pa. 

A number of new members were 
added to the Alumni Association this 
year. But not every member of the 
new class joined. We hope that before 
another year has gone all, who have 
not yet done so, will become affiliated 
with this organization. 

Dr. Reber reports that the Alumni 
are not all doing what they pledged 
themselves to do. We ought to get 
busy, so that this association may 
mean something material to Elizabeth- 
town College. 

The newly elected officers are as fol- 
lows : Pros., James Breitigan ; ist. V. 
Pres., H. H. Nye ; 2nd. V. Pres. E. 'G. 
Diehm; 3rd. V. Pres., Francis Olweil- 
er; Rec. Sec, C. L. Martin; Cor. Sec, 
Lillian Falkenstein; Treas., J. D. Re- 
ber ; Ex. Com., R. W. Schlosser, J. G. 
Meyer, Gertrude Miller. 

Elizabeth Zortman, '06, is still lo- 
cated at Municipal Hospital, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Miss Olive Myers' new address is 
912 S. Washington Ave., Denver, Col. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



The Alumni editor is about to lay 
down her pen and to allow some one 
more able and perhaps more experi- 
enced to take it up and wield it. She 
wishes her successor well and assures 



him that he shall ever have her support 
May "Our College Times" continue to 
grow and prosper so that it may be the 
means of helping many souls who need 
aid and encouragement. 



Books Added to the Library for the 
Year 1912-13 

Senior class of 1912—20 volumes 
poetry. 

J. A. Buffenmyer — Tom Brown at 
Oxford, Tom Brown's School Days, 
History of Johnstown Flood, Centen- 
nial Exposition, Natural Philosophy, 
Things Not Generally Known. 

Albert Reber — God's Financial Plan. 

Lillian F. Perrett — Fireside Uni- 
versity. 

Hon. U. C. Lodge — Sugar at a 
Glance. 

Missionary Reading Circle — Redem- 
tion of Africa, 2 volumes. 

Kathryn Ziegler— Mission Confer- 
ence, Calcutta, India. 

George C. Neff — Heber's Poems, 
Last Days of Pompeii, Waverly, 
Scott's Poetical Works, Ardath, Tom 
Brown, at Oxford, Gibbons, Faith of 
our Fathers, Poetry of Flowers. 

Prof. R. W. Schlosser— Le Francais 
et sa Patrie. 

Dr. D. C. Reber— The Writer. 

Ezra Wenger — Flood and Cyclone 
Disasters. 



Harry D. Moyer— The Pathfinder. 

J, S. Lineaweaver — Capital for 
Working Boys, Stephen, Soldier of the 
Cross. Sterne, Sentimental Journey 
Through France and Italy. 

United States Gov't— Sixty four 
volumes. 

State Librarian — Thirty four 
volumes. 

Library Fund— One Hundred and 
five volumes. 

Miscellaneous— Five Volumes. 

Mlagazines bound — Eighty-five 
volumes. 

Outlook— Twelve volumes. 

Missionary Review of the World— 
Seven volumes. 

Record of Christian Work— Eight 
volumes. 

Popullar Science Monthly— Fifteen 
volumes. 

Review of Reviews — Eighteen 
volumes. 

Educational Review — Three vol- 
umes. 

Atlantic Monthly — Twenty-two vol- 
umes. 

Total for year— Three hundred and 
thirty-eight volumes. 




Friendship at this time seems to be 
a nasty thing. To say that because of 
friendship one must endure pain seems 
inconsistent. But so it is. When the 
things we have been doing and the 
things we have learned to love to do 
cease to be we feel sorry. It is then 
that our little prejudices sink into ob- 
livion and we think of our friends as- 
friends. 



With this in mind we would close 
this year's work with a feeling of grat- 
itude to our exchanges whose kind 
criticisms have been a very great help 
to us during the past year. Hoping 
and trusting that when our work is 
turned over to other hands, the general 
standard of school papers may still be 
raised, we bid you farewell. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



Fresh and Smoked Meats 

S. M. RENSEL 

S. Market St. 0pp. Exchange Bank 

Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. None 
Better, Fe-nr as Good. 

D. H. BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN 



Tht baker who knows how. Phone or drop a postal 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles 

Framing Neatly Executed 

PHOTO SUPPLIES FOR SALE 
Centre Square 



CENTRAL 



MEAT 



MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meat 



H. H. GOOD 



EOLIZABETHTOWN 



UP TO DATE 

Shaving and Hair Cutting 



The Pratt 
Teachers' Agency 



70 Fifth Avenue 
Ncxp- York 



R. H. SHISSLER. 



Receives calls at all seasons for college 
and normal graduates, specialists and 
other teachers in colleges, public and 
private schools in all parts of the coun- 
try. 

Advises parents about schools. 

WM. O. PRATT, Manager 



Plain Suits, Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats. 

GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange Sts., Lancaster, Pa. 

Elizabethtown Dental 
Parlors 

Office Closed Thursday 
and Friday 

S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 

Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
PrcKcriptiens Cartfully Compounded 



26 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



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H College Jewelry cf the Better Sort 

I G. Wm. REISNER 

i Manufacturing 

= Jeweler 

= Class Pins and Rings Prize Cups 

s Fraternity Je'welry Medals 

■ 

= 120 East Chestnut Street. 

1 LANCASTER, PA. 

SliilllBIIIIIBIIIIIBIIIIIBIIlllBllllliilllllBIIIIIBilllliillllliBIIIIIBIIIIIBIIIIIBIIIII 



4.4.4.4Mi.4.4.4.i I .4ti | .i I ii > i I .4.». I .. I .. I .4"l»4'4'4'4'4'4'4"i"j' 

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LEO KOB 



I Heating and 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



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£4>4>4>>i'4>4>4'4>4>4><i><!>4'4>4>4>4'4'4-4>4>4'4><i*4><i'4"l^ 



F. T. Muth 



H. M. Muth 



MUTH BROS. 



Dealers in 



LUMBER:) 

Also all kinds of building material 
and mill work, Slate and Cement, 
Wheeler Screens, Fertilizer, Patent 
Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board, etc. 

COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. 

We also aim to give you a square 
deal that will merit your trade and 
friendship. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. f 

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DENTIST 



GEO. rt. KERSEY 

Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PA. 



WE DO IT RIGHT 

Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES CS, SON 

F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 

Horseshoeing a Specialty. 

N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 



J. GROFF & SONS 

eat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



ry 
This Pen 



— if you want to. Yes, in any posi- 
lion, any pocket. 

Boys: carry the Parker Jack Knife 
Pen in your trousers pocket along 
vviih your keys. 

Girls: carry it in the pocket of 
your white blouse. 

f"'lay football with it, — basketball, 
tennis, hockey. It's on the job the 
minute you want to write, without 
leaving a pinhead spwt of ink any- 
where it has been carried. 

Write? Just im.gine a pen of 
glass that melts to ink &s you slide it 
across paper! That's the way it writes. 

Price $2.50 up. Gel one on trial. 
Take it back any time within 10 
days if you're not tickled to death 
with it. We authorize dealer to re- 
fund. If your dealer doesn't carry 
Parkers, write us for catalog loday. 

PARKER PEN COMPANY 
MiU St.. Janesville, Wis. 

PARKER 

Jade Knife Safety ^ J^ 

FOUNTAIN PEN "1^-o^'" 



For sale at the Bookroom. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 27 



1900 ^ 1912 

IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 

SEVEN REASONS : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance. 
' Christian Home. 

Modern Equipment. 

For further particulars, address 

Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN PA. 



28 



Our Advertisers arc Worthy of Your Patronage. 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-Made Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 

North East Corner Centre Square, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



JACOB FISHER 
Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 

With you for 31 years. That's All 

E H. LEHMAN 
COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN FEED , FLOUR. 
Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Bell and Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 

46 E. King St., Lancaster, Pa. 



CHOICE 



EATS 



A. K. Young 

EMZABBTHTOWN, - PENNA. 



W. R. Ashenfelter I 



CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

W eddinga and arties supplied with 
Fancy Cakes at short notice. 



S. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
"Will convince. Work guaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown. Pa. 



Ind. Phone 



Hours 8 to 6 



DR. JEROME G. HESS 
DENTIST 



Hertzler Bldg. 
Elizabethtown Pa. 




Ebersole & Baney 

Dealers in 

Choice Groceries, Fine Grade of Teas and 

Coffees, Fresh Country Butter and Eggs 

Bell Phone Elizabethtown, Penna 



We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 



Y. M. C. A. Bldg., 



Lancaster, Pa. 



H. H. BRANDT 

Dealer in 

ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



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Elizabethtown, 



Penna. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



THE ''ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD'' 

Elizabethtown's Best Newspaper 

$1.00 a Year Sample Copies Free 



r- 



^ 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
Shipped every Wednesday 



V 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENNA. 



J^ 



Sporting Goods 



Post Cards 



Agent for all periodicals. 

Pocket cutlery, toys, novelties, etc. 

Fine confections. 

H. K. Oorsheimer 

Bell 'Phone 38-3 
On the Square, Elizabethtown. Pa. 



School Supplies 



Stationery 



John A. Fisher 



BARBER 



Centre Square, 



Elizabethto-wn, Pa. 



♦♦♦♦<»♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

I JOS. H. RIDER & SON ' 

^ AGENCY FOR 

I SPALDING'S 

: Baseballl Tennis Goods 



F 
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R 

n 

E 

T 
U 
R 
£ 




C. B. 



flE 



CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



GEO. A. FISHER 

HARDWARE 

Automobiles 
Phonographs and 
Records 
F. P. GAS PLANTS 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



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X ELIZABETHTOWN 

I ROLLER MILLS 



J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Beet Grades of 

FL.OUR AND FEED 

Highest Cash Prices paid for grain, 
hay and straw 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



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30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of iifour Patronage. 



A. A. ABELE 



The Bee Hive Store 



South Market and^Bainbridge Streets, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Dry Goods,Notions, Shoes, Carpets, Draperies and an Up-to-Date line of 
Gent's and Ladies' Furnishings 

''SOMETHING NEW EVERY DAY" 




The Duplex 

Recommends Literary 
and Ccmmercial teachers 
Secretaries and Account- 
ants. Schools for sale. 
Circurlars free. Write 
for further information. 
E'lizabethtown, Pa. 



D. G. BRINSER 



Goal 



Grain, Flour, Feed, 
Seeds, Hay, Straw > 
and Fertilizer. \ 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 

A farmer once to a certain age w 

/In the Lunch Room Business did en- <^ 
gage. 

T'was Nissley. 
Thousands of people now are fed. 
Pure, delicious, quick. Enough said. 

TRY NISSLEY 

14-16 East Chestnut Street 

LANCASTER, PA. 



Lunches 

D. W. MIESSE 

Baker and Confectioner 

123 N. Queen St. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Ice Cream 



Telephones 



Water Ice 






4' 
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Ursinus College 



t 



COLLEGEVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA J 



(24 miles from Philadelphia.) 

Ot>;anized and administered under the Group Sys- 
tem of Instruction, providing both liberal culture and 



4* special preparation for the various vocations, an 






4» arrangement presenting exceptional advantages for 4»" 



efficiency and economy All groups open to women 
as well as men Write for special bulk tin and 
descriptive pamphlet. 

A. Edwin Keigwin D.D., President. 
Geo. Leslie Omwake, Pd.D., Vice-Pres. 



♦♦♦•»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

I Spalding Sporting Goods I 



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Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, 
Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic 
Shoes. Kodaks .and Cameras, de- 
veloping and finishing. 

H. B. H E R R 
30-32 West King Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 



liBiinniiiiHiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiinBiiiiiBiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiHiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiHiiiiH 

IF ITS MUSIC OR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, WE HAVE IT! 

IkirR Johnson & Co. 

MUSIC HALL 
16-18 West King Street, LANCASTER, PA 

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Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



31 



es 



I Mail Orders Solicited for I 
I Books snd Bi 

I THE BOOK STORE 

I C. H. FALKEi^STEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. I 



painttng anb (paper 
Ibanging 

AMOS B. DRACE 

Ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 

Catalogues a Specialty 

311 W. Grant St., LANCASTER, PA. 



REBEI^ WACOnS! 

■is the cry of man and horse. Ttie 
horse says "It pulls so easy" and the 
man says "It rides so nice and lasts 
so long." So come my neighbor, get 
yourself such an outfit and be pleased 
yet more than that. 

REBER WAGON WORKS 
Centreport, Pa. 



c 




LL 



OLLEGE 



AIRY 



Fresh milk and cream daily. All milk 
tested for children; free from tuberculosis 

||» HOTELS AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED « f 



TAKE YOURj 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday moruiDK. 
Returns VVednesday and Friday afternoon. 

CALL AT 
RALPH GROSS SHAVING PARLOR 
Conducted on sanitary principles. 

Massaging a Specialty. 
Agency of First-Class Laundry. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



1 O. N. HEISEY I 

;^ Provisions, Groceries, (®, Choice Candies ^ 



5 HMSBY BUILDING 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PBNNA. ^: 



32 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Elizabettitown Exchange 

Bank 



Transacts a general banking business, pays in- 
terest on time deposits, solicits your patronage 



OFFICERS 



A. G. HEISEY, Pres. 



ALLEN A. COBLE. Vice Pres" 



J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 



DIRECTORS 



A. G. Heisey Jos. G. Heisey B. H. Greider, 

Allen A. Coble Dr. H. K. Plough Henry E. Landis 

Dr. A. M. Kalbach Geo. D. Boggs E. E. Hernly 



H. J. Gisb. 
J. H. Buch 



I P. N. Kraybilll 



Both 'Phones 



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Rheems. - Peun'a S 

Dealer in 

Groceries, Dry Goods, Notions, 
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 



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Hardware, Paints, Oils, Turpen- 
tine and Glass 



$ Oilcloth, Linoleums, Matting, Win- 
dow Shades and Strips 



Soliciting a Share of Your Business 



Warner's 

Corsets 

are the only corsets that are en- 
dorsed so fully and strongly to us. 

Guaranteed to shape fashion- 
ably, to fit comfortably, and not 
to rust, break or tear. 

You connot say any more in 
favor of a corset excepting to give 
its price — 

$1.00 to $2.00 Per Pair 

If we could say just the things 
that we say about Warner's Rust- 
Proof Corsets, it would make 
any corset worth while ; but 
"WARNER'S are the only corsets 
we can make this absolute state- 
ment regarding. 

Huntzberger-Winfers Co. 

ELIZABZTHTO'W^N, PA. 

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